Jump to content

Rio-2016 News


danfla
 Share

Recommended Posts

4th possibility: Much has been done, but it was not enough. The bay is still dirty, "cleaner" than 4 years ago, "dirtier" than Olympic requirements.

____

As I explained several times here, Guanabara Bay have two parts: The part near the ocean, where sailing is expected to be hosted, is cleaner (this does not mean clean, it does have pollution in unacceptable levels for an Olympic competition) and the area very inside the bay, near the industries, this is dirty as hell.

And yes, sensationalism is present again, Athensfan, if you follow the flags (red or green) for cleaner or dirtier water, you can swim in Flamengo beach without leave the water with red dots, what a stupid claim...

Indeed, you can get the report online or even the history of conditions in all Rio de Janeiro beaches for 2013:
http://200.20.53.6/meioambiente/arquivos/geag/praias/barra_e_zona_sul_historico_2013.pdf


*The sailing will take place between Flamengo and Vermelha beaches.

Edited by DannyelBrazil
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4th possibility: Much has been done, but it was not enough. The bay is still dirty, "cleaner" than 4 years ago, "dirtier" than Olympic requirements.

____

As I explained several times here, Guanabara Bay have two parts: The part near the ocean, where sailing is expected to be hosted, is cleaner (this does not mean clean, it does have pollution in unacceptable levels for an Olympic competition) and the area very inside the bay, near the industries, this is dirty as hell.

And yes, sensationalism is present again, Athensfan, if you follow the flags (red or green) for cleaner or dirtier water, you can swim in Flamengo beach without leave the water with red dots, what a stupid claim...

Indeed, you can get the report online or even the history of conditions in all Rio de Janeiro beaches for 2013:

http://200.20.53.6/meioambiente/arquivos/geag/praias/barra_e_zona_sul_historico_2013.pdf

*The sailing will take place between Flamengo and Vermelha beaches.

If discarded mattresses and horse carcasses are an improvement, I'd hate to see what it was like before!

The "red dots" are undoubtedly pure fiction generated by the anti-Brazilian media. How could untreated sewage pouring into the ocean possibly create a health hazard that might trigger the appearance of "red dots?" Preposterous!

Good to know that green flags will make everything ok. Sounds like its under control.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The "red dots" are undoubtedly pure fiction generated by the anti-Brazilian media. How could untreated sewage pouring into the ocean possibly create a health hazard that might trigger the appearance of "red dots?"

The red dots are almost certainly not fictional, being a symptom of more than one well-known water-borne irritant (see "swimmer's itch" and "seabather's eruption") but they don't seem to be associated with pollution as such- unless perhaps the pollution is nutrient-rich.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The red dots are almost certainly not fictional, being a symptom of more than one well-known water-borne irritant (see "swimmer's itch" and "seabather's eruption") but they don't seem to be associated with pollution as such- unless perhaps the pollution is nutrient-rich.

I was being facetious.

And untreated sewage is nutrient rich.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If discarded mattresses and horse carcasses are an improvement, I'd hate to see what it was like before!

The "red dots" are undoubtedly pure fiction generated by the anti-Brazilian media. How could untreated sewage pouring into the ocean possibly create a health hazard that might trigger the appearance of "red dots?" Preposterous!

Good to know that green flags will make everything ok. Sounds like its under control.

Don't play the jerk, you don't need to.

Did you read what I wrote? I said the north part of Guanabara bay is dirty as hell. It's there where you can find horse carcasses and whatever that makes you happy. The south part of Guanabara Bay (near the ocean is in better shape, still NOT CLEAN). There is a difference about it. BTW, it's basically the same challenge Tokyo will face with their own bay. A report made here in Brazil show they face a similar problem, but for sure, they'll solve it before us.

What I mean about red dots in skin is: If the flags are red, nobody should swim in the water, since red flag means DIRTY WATER.

Hope you have a nice day by reading one more bad news from Rio...

Edited by DannyelBrazil
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't play the jerk, you don't need to.

Did you read what I wrote? I said the north part of Guanabara bay is dirty as hell. It's there where you can find horse carcasses and whatever that makes you happy. The south part of Guanabara Bay (near the ocean is in better shape, still NOT CLEAN). There is a difference about it. BTW, it's basically the same challenge Tokyo will face with their own bay. A report made here in Brazil show they face a similar problem, but for sure, they'll solve it before us.

What I mean about red dots in skin is: If the flags are red, nobody should swim in the water, since red flag means DIRTY WATER.

Hope you have a nice day by reading one more bad news from Rio...

Come now, Danny.

I don't want to put Rio down. I hope the Games are fantastic. At the same time it's not appropriate to act like Rio can do no wrong and everything is going to be perfect.

Even with flags, the health conditions of the bay are problematic. Forgive me, but it's not exactly encouraging to read that one side of the bay is filthy, but the side reserved for the Olympics is a little better.

I don't doubt that story made everything sound as bad as possible, but you must admit, even if the truth isn't quite that dark, it still doesn't inspire confidence and doesn't seem a fitting venue for Olympic sailing.

As for the tone of the earlier post, I guess I was feeling a bit mischievous. I didn't mean it personally. I am sorry I upset you.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't doubt that story made everything sound as bad as possible, but you must admit, even if the truth isn't quite that dark, it still doesn't inspire confidence and doesn't seem a fitting venue for Olympic sailing.

I must admit my English is poor but "dirty as hell", for me, means that the place is terrible.

I admit the problem is far from being solved. At this point, I'd rather the sailing to take place in the open waters in front of Barra da Tijuca (clean water, outstanding landscape too).

As for the tone of the earlier post, I guess I was feeling a bit mischievous. I didn't mean it personally. I am sorry I upset you.

Yes, you are one of the people I used to admire here. Still, I'm really upset with your ironic remarks over me because I'm trying to show some articles on international press really wants to put Brazil down more than the reality. Check Daily Mail news about spider and snakes walking on the streets... Suddenly, we became a zoo...

And this very case, the article only was "bad" on the red dot problem...

I'm from Rio, I know people here take the flags and Govt. reports over water conditions seriously. Someone always can ignore it, but this is rare. Very rare.

:)

Edited by DannyelBrazil
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Rio to launch Olympic volunteer programme in August

Rio De Janeiro: The Rio de Janeiro 2016 Olympic organising committee is set to launch its Games volunteer programme in August.

More than 70,000 places will be made available for the programme, a leading agency reported citing officials Thursday.

Other developments planned for 2014 are the naming of the Olympic and Paralympic mascots, expected to occur in the second half of the year.

Organisers will also announce the Games` ticketing schedule and visual theme in the coming months.

The first test event - a sailing regatta - will be held in August at the Marina da Gloria.

The Rio Games, to be held from August 5 to 21, 2016, will be the first time the Olympics have been staged in South America.

IANS
Link to comment
Share on other sites

IOC chief to meet Brazil leader

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach will meet in two weeks with Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and organizers of Rio’s 2016 Olympics to remind them there is no time to waste as they prepare for South America’s first games.

Rio de Janeiro Olympics organizers said Tuesday that Bach would meet Rousseff on Jan. 21 in the capital Brasilia. It was not immediately clear if he would meet Rio organizers — and state and local officials — before or after that meeting.

The IOC has expressed concerns about the pace of building, particularly for the main Olympic park and a smaller venue area in north Rio.

Also, organizers have yet to announce an operating budget, local sponsorship sales appear to be lagging, and pollution is a major problem in waters that will host Olympic events.

Olympic sailors competing a month ago in Rio called Guanabara Bay, the Olympic venue for sailing, “a sewer” and the filthiest body of water they had ever tried to navigate.

Olympic officials are worried that many of the problems surrounding this year’s World Cup in Brazil will also plague the Olympics. This includes the possibility of protests over the billions being spent on the two mega events. The Rio Olympics will cost as much or more than the World Cup, probably about $15 billion.

“The purpose is to ensure seamless cooperation between all stakeholders and to tell the Brazilian authorities the IOC is fully committed to the success of these games,” Bach said in a conference call last month with reporters. “I want to make this statement in person to demonstrate that the new president is behind these Olympic Games.”

Time will begin to close in on the Rio organizers with the first test events usually taking place a year before the games, and some sooner.

“They have reported that there is good progress being made, that the organizing committee is working well, and that on the other hand there is no time to lose,” Bach said.

AP

http://sports.tempo.com.ph/2014/01/ioc-chief-to-meet-brazil-leader/#.Us7OKrMZWPA

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Construction deffiently needs to speed up on the Barra Olympic Park, with only 2 and half years away, they are only on the Foundation Phase, and before the 2 and half years is here, test events aswell.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rio Olympic Organizers Say Costs Rise by 25% to 7 Billion Reais

Brazil’s operating budget for the 2016 summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro has increased by 25 percent above initial estimates to about 7 billion reais ($2.91 billion) as a result of new sports and inflation.

The original spending plan was for 5.6 billion reais, mostly funded through sponsorships and an International Olympic Committee grant.

The Rio 2016 organizing committee has “undertaken a line-by-line critical analysis of the budget, to balance known spending commitments and be able to meet new obligations as they arise,” the organizing committee’s chief executive officer, Sidney Levy, told reporters. “We are striving to achieve a zero contribution of public funds to the committee.”

Rio 2016 said the cost of the games would be met by private sources, through sponsorship, ticket sales, licensing and a grant from the IOC. Brazil’s government agreed to make up any shortfall when it signed the hosting agreement in 2009.

Chief Operating Officer Leo Gryner blamed the higher costs on the addition of sports to the Olympic program and the country’s increasing prices, which he said had grown 39 percent between January 2009 and December last year.

The budget released today is the smaller of the two for the games, with the infrastructure spending plan -- estimated at 23 billion reais during the host bid -- to be released next week. Spending on sporting events became a political issue after millions of people took to the streets last year to protest the government’s spending priorities.

Political Pressure

“When the public comes along and says, ‘Don’t spend all this money and, if you do, we’re counting where you’re spending,’ it tightens all of the pressure,” Andrew Zimbalist, an economist at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, said before today’s announcement.

While both budgets were to be released last April, politicians in South America’s biggest country spent months debating the plans. The government hasn’t updated the budgets since 2009, when it won the right to be the first South American city to host the games.

Olympic budgets are always underestimated as part of the years-long competition to win the games, said Zimbalist, an author of 12 books on the business of sports. He said public pressure in Brazil means officials will try to keep the budgets as low as they can.

The U.K. in 2007 more than tripled to 9.3 billion pounds ($15.5 billion) the spending plan for the 2012 games after underestimating costs to clean up the Olympic Park site and construct venues.

Currency

In dollar terms the budget increase has grown only slightly following a significant fall in the value of Brazil currency. Since the start of 2010 through yesterday the dollar has gained 27 percent on the real.

Rio’s operational budget is made up of revenue from sponsorship, tickets, merchandising and a grant from the IOC that includes a portion of global television and sponsorship income.

The budget for infrastructure projects, such as new roads, railroad lines and arenas, will be split between national and local government and will be announced Jan. 28. Brazil is also spending to stage soccer’s World Cup this year.

The budgets were delayed as local governments and national politicians debated how projects should be funded, and by the August resignation of the head of the Olympic Public Authority, which coordinates the efforts of the three levels of government.

...

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-01-23/rio-olympic-cost-said-to-have-increased-by-25-from-proposal.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Multi-billion dollar infrastructure budget launched for Rio 2016 but Brazilian Government admit it will raise

January 28 - Brazil's Government today revealed that it had budgeted 5.6 billion reals (£1.4 billion/$2.3 billion/€1. 7 billion) on projects for Rio 2016 but admit that the figure is set to raise significantly.

The initial estimate from Brazil's Public Olympic Authority (APO) includes spending by Federal, State and Municipal Governments for 24 approved projects carried out through both public-private partnerships and by the Government alone.

The number does not include spending on 28 planned projects for the Olympics and Paralympics that still require approval.

The total estimate, which is due to be revised in March, also excludes projects such as airports and pollution control, which are not dedicated strictly to holding the Olympics.

"We are committed to being on schedule," Brazilian Sports Minister Aldo Rebelo said at a press conference in Rio de Janeiro to announce the spending plans.

"It is the first time we have a consortium of three levels of Government.

"It is in an effort to ensure the success and execution of all the commitments to deliver the Olympics in Rio in 2016."

Last week, officials said the operating budget for the Games had risen to 7 billion Brazilian real (£1.8 billion/$2.9 billion/€2.1 billion), claiming factors such as inflation and costs for new technology.

The operating budget was originally set to include up to 1.4 billion (£348 million/$577 million/€423 million) reals in public funds, but officials later reduced that figure to zero in response to public outcry over the high cost of stadiums and other projects required by the Olympics and 2014 World Cup, which is due start in June.

Deputy Sports Minister Luis Fernandes claimed that by combining the World Cup costs together into one budget it had confused the Brazilian public, so Olympic officials had decided to make theirs clearer by separating legacy projects from those associated with the Games.

Partnerships with the private sector account for more than 70 per cent of the budget released today.

"We understand we have to communicate in a clearer fashion, that's what we're trying to do here now," Fernandes said at the event in Rio.

"That's part of what we learned.

"People were confusing basic investments in infrastructure, which serve the country as a whole, as part of the costs of the Games.

"They're not part of the Games."

Government and APO officials both refused to try to speculate by how much costs will raise but significantly the budget plans released today do not include work needed to be carried out on Deodoro, the sports complex which is scheduled to host seven Olympic sports, including equestrian, mountain biking and BMX, modern pentathlon, shooting, slalom canoeing, hockey and fencing.

Plans for the complex are running a long way behind schedule and a public tender for the work still has to be launched.

Insidethegames

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sound's like things are not going too well for Rio...Well it looks the IOC is going to get even more criticism (especially from CNN and other American news corps that backed Chicago 2016). Time for the Asians to jump on board and save this sinking ship we call the Olympic Movement.

In all fairness, construction is starting to speed up on the World Cup venues, so it might speed up on the Rio 2016 Venues soon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...