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danfla
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Rissóis? WTF is this?

After google, I discovered it's what we call "rissoles" in Brazil or "Rissole" in any country who speaks English

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rissole

And, as every single time in Internet, "tugas" will claim their way of writing is correct in 3... 2... 1...

Edited by DannyelBrazil
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After google, I discovered it's what we call "rissoles" in Brazil or "Rissole" in any country who speaks English

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rissole

And, as every single time in Internet, "tugas" will claim their way of writing is correct in 3... 2... 1...

As a portuguese teacher I would tell you that there are several regional variants to the same word and that they all are correct, so that snack is called Rissol in the singular and Rissóis in the plural in the continental portuguese, in brazillian portuguese it seems to be Rissole/Rissoles, regional variants to the same thing, all correct.

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Hey Mr. Carvalho, I'm curious. Are you a teacher from Portugal or do you in fact teach 'portuguese'? The English language is very limited and can cause such confusions.

Anyways, thx for the infos.


Btw, what are your observations on Mr. Catra's lyrics? Do you know Mr. Catra's poesy? If not, read my sig. I quoted there a part of one of his greatest hits.

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Hey Mr. Carvalho, I'm curious. Are you a teacher from Portugal or do you in fact teach 'portuguese'? The English language is very limited and can cause such confusions.

Anyways, thx for the infos.

Btw, what are your observations on Mr. Catra's lyrics? Do you know Mr. Catra's poesy? If not, read my sig. I quoted there a part of one of his greatest hits.

I'm from Portugal, while I'm a certified teacher of English and Portuguese, currently I have another job. Never heard of Mr. Catra, looks colorful, lol

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Well, it seems the slalom canoe venue shift is off the agenda:

Rio 2016 canoe slalom to stay in the mainstream

October 9 - The canoe slalom course for the Rio 2016 Olympics is to remain close to the heart of the action in Deodoro, insidethegames understands.

Official confirmation of the decision, which should delight the white-water canoeing community, is likely to come soon, enabling detailed planning of the venue, with an eye to its long-term legacy configuration, to move ahead.

The news follows last month's shock disclosure that consideration was being given to moving the event to a course 700 miles away near the world-famous Iguaçu Falls, to cut costs and reduce the Olympic and Paralympic project's construction burden.

The International Canoe Federation (ICF) came out strongly against this counter-proposal, with José Perurena López, its President, describing the possible move as "disappointing", arguing that it threatened to "marginalise our athletes, the competition and the future of canoe slalom in Brazil".

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The ICF had said that the idea of switching the event to Foz do Iguassu, which hosted the 2007 Canoe Slalom World Championships, had been suggested "following fears that the construction costs of the canoe slalom course would be between $30 million and $70 million".

Confirmation of the original Deodoro location would seem to imply that organisers are now confident of being able to deliver a top-class facility with a viable legacy plan for a sum very much at the lower end of that range.

With International Olympic Committee (IOC) concerns over the rate of progress of the broader Olympic and Paralympic project plainly mounting however, the amount of work accomplished at Deodoro and elsewhere over the next 12-18 months may be critical if a potentially budget-busting dash for the line to get everything finished on time is to be avoided.

Insidethegames

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grammatically speaking can I use 'Mr.' before 'Sir'? Doesn't sound well.

Generally, when using "Mr." in dialogue (as opposed to the address on correspondence) it should be followed only by the addressee's surname. If "Sir" is Rols' forename, then it would actually be acceptable to use "Mr. Sir Rols" when writing the address on correspondence, but if he is using "Sir" as a title, then nothing more than "Sir Rols" should be used (and for correspondence addressing, you would need to find out his surname).

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  • 2 weeks later...

Uh-oh...a statue of Christ bigger than Rio's Redeemer one is unveiled in...of all places, SYRIA!!

http://www.themoscowtimes.com/arts_n_ideas/article/muscovite-builds-record-breaking-jesus-statue-in-syria/488312.html

It stands one meter taller than the Rio Redeemer.

Just wait until Syria becomes an Islamist state and they will have a lot of metal to melt down.

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looks like a viral marketing campaign sponsored by samsung. In every video someone is using what appears to be one of their smartphones. Also, the whois info on the domain points to samsung servers.

Hey Dannyel, you know what this is?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TkWsoMqbhwg

http://www.mysteriouscircles.com/

It seems a logo with a ball in the middle, should be related to sports.

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Hey Dannyel, you know what this is?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TkWsoMqbhwg

http://www.mysteriouscircles.com/

It seems a logo with a ball in the middle, should be related to sports.

Dallagnese seems to know... I read something about it, but didn't got my attention, sorry.

I'm a bit away from Rio news lately... It seems I'm becoming a Paulista (gosh!!!!! help me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)

*LOL

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  • 1 month later...

IOC praises progress of Rio 2016 Olympic Games preparations Two-day Project Review ends with authority hailing advances in venues and sports planning, communications and branding

ioc__alexferro_27112013-7298_0.jpg
The IOC's 8th Project Review took place at Rio 2016 headquarters (Photo: Rio 2016/Alex Ferro)

Preparations for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games received praise from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) today as the authority finished its 8th Project Review in the city.

The IOC reported that significant progress had been made across various areas, specifically noting the advances in venue management, sports planning, communications and branding.

After two days of presentations and meetings with members of the Rio 2016 Organising Committee, the Rio Municipal Government, Rio State Government, Brazilian Federal Government and the Olympic Public Authority, there was an overall sense that preparations for the 2016 Games are advancing at a solid pace.

The launch of the Rio 2016 sport pictograms was seen as a particular success in the area of branding, while in the area of sports, the IOC was pleased to learn that negotiations with all International Federations have allowed the organising committee to finalise the venue master plan.

“Completion of the detailed venue master plan two and a half years out is an excellent result. It compares favourably with previous editions of the Games, which saw adjustments later in the preparations,” said IOC Sports Director Christophe Dubi, speaking on the second and final day of the Project Review.

The IOC was also satisfied to learn about the steps being taken by the Rio State Government to ensure that the Olympic sailing course, in Guanabara Bay, will be clean and in good condition for the athletes.

Rio 2016 President Carlos Nuzman said: “We have enjoyed two very busy and productive days of meetings. As always, we have greatly benefited from the IOC’s expert guidance and support.

“Working hand-in-hand with our colleagues from the three levels of government, we have made important advances in our project. We are proud to have finalised the venue masterplan in record time.

“Hosting an Olympic and Paralympic Games is a hugely demanding project, with many challenges, but we are firmly on track and working every day with great focus, energy and commitment to deliver unforgettable Games in 2016.”

The next major IOC visit to Rio will be for the 6th Coordination Commission session next year (19-21 March), by which time the organisation will want to see Rio 2016’s plans for its Culture Programme and further progress in communications, legacy and overall engagement.

The IOC will continue to pay close attention to the state of Guanabara Bay and construction works in the Deodoro competition zone.

Rio 2016

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  • 2 weeks later...

Olympic sailing venue the 'most polluted'

By Stephen Wade

Associated Press

RIO DE JANEIRO — Olympic sailors on Saturday checked out the venue for the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro.

Many didn’t like what they saw.

“I’ve been sailing all over the world for 20 years now, and this is the most polluted place I’ve ever been,” said Allan Norregaard, a Danish bronze medalist in the 2012 London Olympics. “It’s really a shame because it’s a beautiful area and city, but the water is so polluted, so dirty and full of garbage.”

Rio’s local Olympic organizing committee has promised the pollution will be cleaned up when the Olympics open in 2 1/2 years. Government officials have pledged to reduce 80 percent of the pollution flowing into the bay.

But the sailors doubt the problem can be fixed after festering for decades, and many worry about their health. Environmentalists call measures being taken “stopgap,” likely to mask the problem and not cure it.

The Associated Press has documented over the last several weeks that nearly 70 percent of Rio’s waste goes untreated into surrounding waters. Famous beaches like Copacabana and Ipanema are dirty. Untreated sewage pours into a lagoon bordering the Olympic Park, the heart of the games.

Norregaard said that while sailing the last few days he’d seen entire trees floating in the bay, doors, chunks of timber with nails protruding, swollen mattresses and endless plastic bags.

Another sailor talked about a horse carcass in the 148-square-mile bay, which opens into the Atlantic just above Rio’s famed Copacabana beach.

The Dane said the floating debris makes racing unfair and dangerous. The other issue is the health risk with high levels of fecal coliform bacteria in the water.

“I would definitely not swim in it,” Norregaard said. “We have had a couple of incidents where people went in the water and came up with red dots on their body. I don’t know what’s in the water, but it’s definitely not healthy.”

Brazilian sailor Martine Soffiatti Grael grew up on the bay. Her father, Torben Grael, is a five-time Olympic medalist, two of them gold.

“For me since I was a child, it has only gotten worse,” said the 22-year-old, who hopes to qualify for the Rio Games. “The government says it has lots of programs to clean the bay, but I haven’t seen any progress being made.”

Thomas Bach, the new president of the International Olympic Committee, is scheduled to be in Rio early next year to monitor progress. The IOC is concerned about delays in organizing and building venues, and pollution is another worry with costs for the games put at $15 billion — a mix of public and private money.

“Of course, the water will not be clean as sailing in the Caribbean,” Brazilian Robert Scheidt, who has won five Olympic medals, said by phone to the AP. “I have never swum in there (Guanabara). ... Inside the bay I know it’s not the proper place to swim. I’ve sailed there and never got any disease.”

Ian Barker, who won a silver medal for Britain in the 2000 Olympics and now coaches Ireland, said he’s sailed in 35 countries, and this is the worst. He said sailors in training have had to stop to disentangle their rudders from rubbish.

“It’s a sewer,” he said. “It’s absolutely disgusting. Something has to be done about it.’’

The Florida Times-Union

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Some strong quotes in that article from those who should know.

Well, it either goes one of two ways doesn't it?

1. The waters aren't cleaned up and the complaints continue....or...

2. The waters are cleaned up, the complaints stop, and Rio is left with an amazing legacy of much cleaner shores after these Games.

This is exactly the sort of thing the Games should be good at forcing cities to address. Let's hope Rio turns what at the moment is a negative into a massive positive.

Edited by Rob.
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Some strong quotes in that article from those who should know.

Well, it either goes one of two ways doesn't it?

1. The waters aren't cleaned up and the complaints continue....or...

2. The waters are cleaned up, the complaints stop, and Rio is left with an amazing legacy of much cleaner shores after these Games.

This is exactly the sort of thing the Games should be good at forcing cities to address. Let's hope Rio turns what at the moment is a negative into a massive positive.

There is a third possibility.

The bay is already perfect and this story is nothing but more lies being spread by European and North American media who are on a mission to make Brazil look bad.

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