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Rio-2016 News


danfla
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Oh and João Havelange stadium would already be closed for works to the 2016 Olympics. it's completely fine. They just closed it earlier to give the teams of Rio de Janeiro no alternative other than signing with the new owners of Maracanã. The mayor is shady as hell and have a lot of shady business with Eike Baptista, a charlatan that with the help of his father that was a minister during the military dictatorship that ruled Brazil stole a lot of confidential information about mines of precious goods and made his son rich as **** (now he's losing everything).

Havelange Olympic Stadium is fine. Attested by Brazilians engineers association and an English Company. In fact, the mayor's shady allegation said the roof would go down with winds of 60km per hour in the city. Funnily enough a month later winds reached 93km/h and the roof still there.

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"hideous acts of corruption" lol.

Please, be honest: would you repeat your words in front of a jury? You're too imprudent with your words. That's why sometimes I hate the internet. Just because you heard some newspapper or worse say something it doesn't mean it's true. He as the president of a private company received commissions from another private company after signing with it. It was considered unethical /illegal by a swiss court and he returned the money. That was his 'punishment' by his 'hideous acts of corruption'. LOL. In many other countries it could not be considered illegal.

Anyways, I bet you're a Chaves(RIP) hater aswell. just because the international press say a lot of bullshit about him.

With all due respect, MrCatra, I don't like Chavez because I actually live in that country and I've experimented myself all the **** he and his lackies have done, not because of the international media ¬_¬ . Now you're the one sounding imprudent with your words, that commentary was totally unrelated to this conversation.

Anyway, why do I even bother replying to you..

Now, not being offtopic anymore here, what do you think of the recent protests at Brazil condemning both the WC/Olympics (as well for other social problems) ? They're not as bad as the ones in Istanbul but still...

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/18/world/americas/thousands-gather-for-protests-in-brazils-largest-cities.html?smid=fb-share&_r=1&

954693_430191420412228_704215803_n.jpg

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Few weeks ago, Portugal held huge protests too. Is everything in Portugal not good too?

Generalisms are the worst way to place arguments...

Answering the question: Brazilians are free to protest, indeed it's a right guaranteed by our constitution with big letters, so yes, probably protests will happen.

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The protests in Portugal were justified, they even should have been greater in order to cause the fall of this right wing government, but in Brasil's case for the outside looker these protests are unexpected.

The protests in Portugal were justified, they even should have been greater in order to cause the fall of this right wing government, but in Brasil's case for the outside looker these protests are unexpected.

Actually it could applied the same argument in Brazil. Also, with the recent actions and declaration for the government, it's not the same situation as Turkey.

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I'm sure this protest was articulated by opposition politicians. They took a small movement "the revolt of twenty cents" and placed the world cup and olympics in the package. But the majority of the population is in favor of the world cup and the olympics.

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I'm sure this protest was articulated by opposition politicians. They took a small movement "the revolt of twenty cents" and placed the world cup and olympics in the package. But the majority of the population is in favor of the world cup and the olympics.

No, it's not. A large part of society is now opposing the hosting of the World Cup and the Olympics. Back in 2007, during the bid, the government promised not to use public money to build stadiums, but now the bill is up to BRL 28 billion. People realized these events will not improve the lives of the common citzen, but only make more money for big companies and contractors.

And this is not an opposition campaign. The mass demonstrations even hostilized political groups trying to raise political parties flags... This is not political, it is spontaneous. The protests are becoming anti-systemic, not anti-government... Brazilians are trying to say that representative democracy has failed, and politicians no longer represent the people.

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There are people against the world cup, against the government, there are people who are there and don't even know why are protesting. When people took to the streets in a united voice against former President Collor, the goal was achieved. But without a strong reason, a specific goal, all this mobilization will go nowhere. I see a lot of poster against corruption. Maybe have been corruption in a venue or another, but when corruption has been PROVEN in the episode known as "Mensalão", we have not seen anything like this. This movement began with small protests against rising prices of public transport, so people were summoned through social networks, as each one have reasons to protest, they joined. Many people don't like football. Maybe some women are protesting simply because their boyfriends preferred watching games with friends. The world cup is not the problem, nor is the solution, but can be a push, who knows, for a better country. Breaking the FIFA hotel was stupid. This definitely doesn't help. This protest is vague. When they have a good argument, I'll be there on the streets. I will not be a puppet because I know that there is a hidden motivation, politics, even if people say they are not there for that.

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I heard people saying that we live in an "modern dictatorship". Young people don't know what is dictatorship. Under the dictatorship, the government does not allow protests like this. The protesters would be arrested, injured or killed. What I saw was the opposite. Police officers that were there to ensure people's right to express themselves, were trapped and injured. They want democracy? Then go home and wait until next year and make the right choice in the next election.

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Let's discuss it in the thread created to discuss protests in Brazil, please...

We are taking the focus of some threads dedicated to stadiums, events, organization...

And to discuss in only one thread, make the arguments clear to think about and talking.

=]

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What I find interesting is comparing peoples reaction to these protests to the reaction to protests and incidents in London before their games, that had no connection to the Olympics whatsoever.

People created threads dedicated to them, plastering images of burning cars with statements like London Burns!!! At the time it made me mad and they said we are just commenting on situations in the next host city but the lack of that reaction here just goes to justify my belief that people really had a grudge against London for whatever pathetic reason.

Being an Olympic host city gets the world focussed on you, both the good and the bad.

Sorry I couldn't even find a protest thread or I would have posted in there.

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What I find interesting is comparing peoples reaction to these protests to the reaction to protests and incidents in London before their games, that had no connection to the Olympics whatsoever.

People created threads dedicated to them, plastering images of burning cars with statements like London Burns!!! At the time it made me mad and they said we are just commenting on situations in the next host city but the lack of that reaction here just goes to justify my belief that people really had a grudge against London for whatever pathetic reason.

Being an Olympic host city gets the world focussed on you, both the good and the bad.

Sorry I couldn't even find a protest thread or I would have posted in there.

This is the thread, it's hot!

http://www.gamesbids.com/forums/topic/22846-a-honest-opinion-of-a-brazilian-about-the-world-cup/

You can post you comments and thoughts here, it's just to organize the discussion in one thread only, since everybody is putting their 2 cents there.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Rogge defends spending on Rio Olympics, World Cup

LONDON (AP) -- IOC President Jacques Rogge says the massive public spending in Brazil on the World Cup and Olympics will leave long-lasting benefits ''for generations to come.''

Responding to the recent wave of protests across Brazil, Rogge says the billions of dollars being spent on next year's World Cup and 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro will bring major infrastructure improvements.

On a teleconference with reporters Wednesday, Rogge said that the spending is ''not for the two weeks of the Olympic Games or the month of the FIFA World Cup.''

He says ''definitely we'll have to explain very clearly to all the public that the investments made for the Olympic Games is going to give a sustainable legacy for generations to come.''

Rogge also reiterates his confidence in Russia's security measures for next year's Winter Games in Sochi, saying ''I'm sure they will deliver.''

AP

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/rogge-defends-spending-rio-olympics-151116260--oly.html

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Danny, no one is saying the games are "useless" or suggesting we "get rid of them."

I don't think it is accurate to say that all places in the world are equally crime-ridden and equally dangerous. From what I understand, Brazil less safe than many countries. That is not an insult. It just seems to be the way things are. The IOC was not troubled by the crime question and expects Brazil to stage great Games with excellent security. I hope that is exactly what happens. In the mean time, stories of crime will continue to get press attention because Brazil is hosting the two biggest international events within two years of each other.

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The IOC was not troubled by the crime question and expects Brazil to stage great Games with excellent security. I hope that is exactly what happens. In the mean time, stories of crime will continue to get press attention because Brazil is hosting the two biggest international events within two years of each other.

Protests are not crime... In fact, it's a right to all citizen, as written in our constitution.

What crimes are you talking about? We are not talking about crime... Not even Mr. Rogge.

From what I understand, Brazil less safe than many countries.

Generalism, we have lots of cities and towns with zero violence... You can claim most big cities in Brazil have problems with crime. That's accurate, not all Brazil. Not even all big cities of Brazil.

In fact, Rio de Janeiro have crime rates lower than few big cities of USA. How can be?

And, of course, there are dozens of countries with better safety standards than Brazil. This is notorious, indeed, when IOC choose Brazil as host of 2016 games.

Maybe, they checked the records of the events already held in the country in the last decades... Indeed, very successufl ones.

Edited by DannyelBrazil
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Not me too.

BTW, just bought a brand new car last week, helping to keep Brazil as the 4th biggest car market in the planet...

my problem with the situation is not the protest. is that brazil bid(and were given) for BOTH the world cup and the olympics in the same decade. both of these are quite expensive and one country hosting will hurt the backs (and pockets) of its people.

C'mon, the GDP of Brazil in 2012 was USD 2.396 trillion. Some USD 30 billion to be paied in long term financing for both events will not hurt Brazilian Govt. budget.

Pretty worse is to use US$ 311 billion (PER YEAR!) just to keep the ministeries' workers and buildings services in Brasilia...

In fact, some international analysts are amazed why Brazilians are protesting, since Brazil is much better in lots of aspects now than 10 or 15 years ago. (At this very moment, our macroeconomic indexes are under pressure, still, the quality of life increased a lot in the last 10-15 years).

The problem is: we pay scandinavian-like taxes and get african-like public services (specially education and health). People is tired of it.

Brazil have enough money to provide better public services. That's simply it.

Edited by DannyelBrazil
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  • 3 weeks later...

Rio 2016 marks three years to go

RIO_3years_BIG.jpg

05/08/2013

Rio de Janeiro is celebrating three years to go until it hosts the 2016 Olympic Games, with the Organising Committee announcing that the project is on track to make Olympic history by delivering the first Games ever held in South America.

Monday 5 August marks three years until the Opening Ceremony of the Games, when the Brazilian city will welcome around 10,500 athletes from around the world.

At the heart of the Rio 2016 project is a commitment to use the Games as a catalyst to accelerate the development and improvement of Rio in areas such as urban infrastructure, transport, security, accommodation, education, and sports participation, in order to leave a lasting legacy for many generations to come.

Due to the legacy of hosting the 2007 Pan American Games, almost half of the Rio 2016 venues are already built, with construction projects for the new permanent and temporary venues underway, ahead of a full test event programme, which is planned to run from August 2015 to April 2016.

The Games will take place with venues in clusters across four Olympic zones – Barra, Deodoro, Copacabana and Maracana – while, uniquely, Rio 2016 will also feature two Olympic Parks, with Barra Olympic Park hosting nine Olympic sports and the Deodoro Olympic Park staging eight Olympic sports.

IOC President Jacques Rogge underlined how Rio was using the Games as a catalyst for the cities development.

“In Copenhagen in 2009, the Rio 2016 bid team promised to deliver Games of celebration and transformation,” he said. “Four years on and, using the Games as a catalyst, that transformation is taking shape, with new sporting and transport infrastructure already in use, new hotels under construction, the port area being renovated, and social projects helping to improve security and life for local communities through sport.

“As we reach the three-years-to-go mark, Rio 2016 is working hard to deliver on its vision and its commitments to the athletes of the world and to the people of Brazil. I am confident that Rio’s transformation will continue apace and that athletes, fans, and citizens will celebrate great Olympic Games together in Rio in 2016.”

Rio 2016 President Carlos Nuzman added: “Thanks to the dedicated and experienced team of Rio 2016, we are keeping up with commitments, and working rationally to stage excellent Games in 2016.

“In three years’ time, history will be made as the first Games to be hosted on South American soil are officially opened. It will be a proud moment for Rio, Brazil and everyone involved in the project, and we look forward to welcoming the world with open arms.”

IOC

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