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Sir Rols

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Sir Tay: India's Olympic bid dented

India's aspirations of hosting an Olympic Games will have been badly hit by the chaos surrounding next month's Delhi Commonwealth Games, says one of New Zealand's most experienced Olympic administrators.

Sir Tay Wilson, a member of the International Olympic Committee for 18 years retiring in 2006, today said he was confident the Delhi Games would go ahead, for all their preparation problems.

The New Zealand team yesterday announced it had moved accommodation within the village due the uncleanliness and lack of acceptable facilities in the area allocated.

Delegates from other countries have also reportedly objected strongly to "unliveable'' conditions in the village as the readiness of the Games starting on October 3 come under further scrutiny.

New Zealand chef de mission Dave Currie yesterday said he was shocked at what confronted him when he arrived at the team's allocated accommodation last week.

Sir Tay said the issues raised so far may not stop the Games, but may well have wrecked any hopes India had of hosting an Olympics.

"I think the (Delhi) Games will go ahead, but any aspirations India had of hosting an Olympics, they will have lost credibility quite dramatically,'' Wilson told NZPA today.

"The Commonwealth Games are a big event, and each country tries to outdo its predecessor as to the facilities they provide and the experience they provide.

"As far as India was concerned, it was a step in the direction of 'let's bid for an Olympic Games', but I think they'd find it very, very difficult if they decided to now.''

Sir Tay said there were often concerns around Olympic or Commonwealth Games going ahead, with even the successful 2004 Athens Olympics ready only at the last minute, and fears Beijing in 2008 would be choked by air pollution.

"But in my experience, I think this is the worst. I went to Moscow (1980 Olympics), but that was a political issue. This one is very much a facility and safety issue for the athletes.''

...

stuff.co.nz

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After what has been described as an "exceptional" Commonwealth Games, what do you think of Delhi's chances of hosting a Summer Olympics now?

Exceptionally bad :lol: :lol: :lol: If they get the summer olympics in 2020, The USA's federal debt will also be gone by 2020, and we will have a budget surplus in 2025. And Uganda will win the world cup in 2026

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Doubts cast over India's ability to stage Olympics

By Alex Capstick

BBC Sport reporter

A leading Commonwealth Games official has cast doubt on Delhi's ability to host the 2020 Olympics.

The possibility of launching a bid has been mooted by sports leaders in India. Olympic President Jacques Rogge indicated he would support the idea.

But Commonwealth Games Federation Chief Executive Mike Hooper said it might be too soon.

The Indian capital suffered a series of setbacks in its preparations for this year's Commonwealth Games.

Widespread problems

The Games are one of the world's biggest multi-sports events.

Dirty accommodation, unsafe venues and stories of corrupt officials dominated the headlines in the build-up to them.

But it did not stop International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge from suggesting the Indian capital had laid the foundations for an Olympic bid.

And despite the widespread problems, Indian sports leaders have frequently spoken of their desire to bring the Olympics to Delhi.

But Mr Hooper - whose job it was to monitor the city's preparations for the Commonwealth Games - advised them not to rush into things.

"The reality is [that] in time I think they [will] have the capacity, [but] I think that would be a big ask of India at this time," he said.

India's reputation as organisers of such major sports events could suffer further damage when the results of an investigation into allegations of corruption surrounding the Commonwealth Games are revealed.

But there is a growing recognition that India, a country of 1.2 billion people, will one day stage the Olympics. It is one of the few market places the Olympics has not broken into.

And, as demonstrated at the Commonwealth Games in which India finished second in the medals table, its population has discovered and taken up sports other than cricket.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-11670155

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Most in India may not want the games in the near future, other than politicians and sports officials. These big sporting events can be good for infrastructure in some cases, but Delihi has proved once again that it is not always the case. Why is the world led to believe that having the games is critical to their status as people/players on the world stage. This seems very un-Olympic. Yes, there is a huge population and there is opportunity for the IOC to tap into the finances of another market but should they? It just seems silly when Jacques Rogge encourages encourages India after the mess that just occurred there with this organization for the CWG. It was a much bigger mess than anyone will probably ever know due to spin and cover up. These organizations are like icebergs, you only see a bit at the top and there is 80% more of the same under the surface that gets covered up. India is not ready.

...And I wonder how this has tarnished Indias image round the world. I've never been but was intrigued by the excellent "Incredible India" marketing campaign they had implemented the last couple years. I believe that has been total discredited by these games. How much did that cost india?

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^ Paul...there's the thing. Most of the world hears reports of collapsing bridges, rushed or shoddy construction, dirty sleeping quarters for the athletes, dengue fever and then couple that with their own mental images of past events like terrorism, pollution, poverty, accidents with overcrowded trains, and the like and India's international image takes a step backward. Its all about the perception.

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Most in India may not want the games in the near future, other than politicians and sports officials. These big sporting events can be good for infrastructure in some cases, but Delihi has proved once again that it is not always the case. Why is the world led to believe that having the games is critical to their status as people/players on the world stage. This seems very un-Olympic. Yes, there is a huge population and there is opportunity for the IOC to tap into the finances of another market but should they? It just seems silly when Jacques Rogge encourages encourages India after the mess that just occurred there with this organization for the CWG. It was a much bigger mess than anyone will probably ever know due to spin and cover up. These organizations are like icebergs, you only see a bit at the top and there is 80% more of the same under the surface that gets covered up. India is not ready.

...And I wonder how this has tarnished Indias image round the world. I've never been but was intrigued by the excellent "Incredible India" marketing campaign they had implemented the last couple years. I believe that has been total discredited by these games. How much did that cost india?

Paul, it is true that some reports from Delhi CWG were not that good for a possible Indian SOG bid. But, if you allow me to, I would say that there is a lot of prejudice mixed with the real events reports. That happened to Rio 2007 before, during and after the PANAM Games. Some news were true, but most of them were not. One must have in mind that a SOG is an event that can project the image of country and we are talking here about money, money and money. There will always be a lobby to keep the Games among the so said safe zone, as if the Games were a kind of property of the developed world. They are not. Of couse, India faced problems during the CWG. But so did Atlanta in 1996, Athens in 2004, not to say the heavy hand of the Chinese Governement that did not let us know what happened before, during and after Beijing 2008. One must have in mind that this was India's very first time in organizing such a kind of event: even mistakes, errors and what someone said "a mess" have to be understood as lessons India lived and learnt. I think India is now much more prepared to host the SOG than before it hosted the CWG. It is called expertise.

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Paul, it is true that some reports from Delhi CWG were not that good for a possible Indian SOG bid. But, if you allow me to, I would say that there is a lot of prejudice mixed with the real events reports. That happened to Rio 2007 before, during and after the PANAM Games. Some news were true, but most of them were not. One must have in mind that a SOG is an event that can project the image of country and we are talking here about money, money and money. There will always be a lobby to keep the Games among the so said safe zone, as if the Games were a kind of property of the developed world. They are not. Of couse, India faced problems during the CWG. But so did Atlanta in 1996, Athens in 2004, not to say the heavy hand of the Chinese Governement that did not let us know what happened before, during and after Beijing 2008. One must have in mind that this was India's very first time in organizing such a kind of event: even mistakes, errors and what someone said "a mess" have to be understood as lessons India lived and learnt. I think India is now much more prepared to host the SOG than before it hosted the CWG. It is called expertise.

You're joking right?

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Yet another reason why a potential Delhi 2020 bid should be considered simply ridiculous...

New Delhi should be stopped from bidding for the Olympics over unpaid bills claim Australian firm

29 November 2010

By Duncan Mackay

British Sports Internet Writer of the Year

India should not be allowed to bid for the Olympics and Paralympics because they have failed to pay millions of dollars to foreign firms involved in last month's Commonwealth Games in New Delhi, claims Ric Birch the executive producer at the Opening Ceremony.

Birch's Spectak Productions, which is based in Sydney and Los Angeles, is owed 15 per cent of its fees for creative direction, choreography, and design, which the Delhi organisers have so far refused to pay, he has claimed.

Spectak are one of several foreign firms involved in the Games who claim that they are still waiting payment for the services they provided.

Switzerland-based Event Knowledge Services (EKS), a company who are a spin-off from the International Olympic Committee's transfer of knowledge service and who work with some of the biggest events in the world, are also owed money.

Birch, the executive producer of the Opening Ceremony in Delhi who has worked with the Olympics stretching back to Los Angeles in 1984, also claims that 100 shipping containers of lighting, audio, pyrotechnic and staging equipment are stranded in India at the docks or at the main stadium as customs and the official freight supplier, Agility, refuse to process the necessary paperwork.

Sydney-based fireworks company Howard and Sons is also owed about $300,000 (£185,000) and is unable to export about $1 million (£618,000) of equipment used for the Closing Ceremony.

Birch claimed that it was because of the fears in India over being accused in corruption that is causing the situation.

"Every single detail, every single word - its meaning, definition, its possible connotation - of every document and contract is being minutely examined, checked, double-checked and triple-checked to ensure that no one can be accused of a transgression," he said.

"People are scared that if they clear a bill, say, of an Australian contractor, they will be accused by the media of 'siphoning' money off to an Australian.

"The media have made such crazy and wild allegations that no one wants to take any chances."

But Birch claimed that the situation is already damaging New Delhi's proposed bid for the 2020 Olympics and Paralympics.

"Certainly this type of behaviour makes it extremely unlikely that any of the international suppliers, consultants and contractors involved in Delhi 2010 would in any way support or endorse any future attempt by India to host the Olympic Games, should India decide to make a bid," he said.

If the main man behind some of the most notable Opening Ceremonies in recent Olympic history has such strident criticism, and considering the almost chaotic disability of the Indians to get anything organised in time from local suppliers for the Delhi CGs (with the added problem of corruption charges), well they have about as much chance of getting a successful bid up in the next three or four Olympic bid cycles as FIFA has of passing an ethics exam.

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I didn't know where to post this article; should it be a discussion on whether we give FIFA too much flak (there's a short answer to that for me and it has two letters), should it be a discussion about weak international sporting bodies, or should it be another discussion about India's capabilities and their hypothetical Olympic bid?


Cricket World Cup is another Indian shambles

Given how these organisations see themselves as accountable to nobody but themselves, and this in an era when the cry of democracy and transparency cannot even be resisted by Arab despots, this may seem a ridiculous question.

Yet I am inclined to raise it because of how different the Cricket World Cup in India is turning out compared to the Football World Cup in South Africa.

I have been struck by this comparison in the past week as I have travelled in India following the 50-over cricket tournament.

It is widely accepted that the World Cup in South Africa was a very well organised affair.

I am sure the London Olympics will provide a similar, if not better show.

India, in contrast, has demonstrated for the second times in six months how not to organise a world event.

It boils down to control. Both FIFA and IOC exercise iron control over their events.

Neither the Commonwealth Games Federation, nor the International Cricket Council have such powers.

It has meant the Indians have been left to their own devises and they have brewed quite a horlicks.

We all know the appalling problems of last October's Commonwealth Games, both in the run-up and during it.

This included the shambolic way the Indians prepared for the Games, with the media exposing shocking living conditions for athletes just days before the Games were due to begin.

Then there were ticketing problems, with Indian officials insisting venues were sold out, yet most events were held with hardly anyone present.

It was as if, having bought tickets, spectators were stubbornly refusing to come and watch the sports.

The Commonwealth Games Federation was an impotent bystander as these events unfolded, saying it had none of the resources that the IOC has.

India did try and redeem itself as the Games commenced, but its end has not meant the end of the Indian misery.

The shadow cast by the allegations of corruption is so large that, with the arrest last week of two more officials of the Organising Committee, the entire leadership of the Games, barring the chairman Suresh Kalmadi, is now behind bars.

All the indications are that Central Bureau of Investigation, the Indian FBI, has far from completed its task and the Indian media freely speculates about how many more may be arrested.

While there is no suggestion of sleaze at this World Cup, ticketing has again been a huge problem.

This time, the on-line system has proved so wretched that fans who had bought tickets six months ago have still not received them.

Even the commercial partners of the International Cricket Council have not received their tickets.

The most unedifying moments for the Indians came last Thursday as spectators queued at the box office for tickets for Sunday's India-England match in Bangalore.

Instead of officials asking for credit cards or cash, they found policemen carrying lathis, batons, and were given quite a beating.

The Bangalore City Police Commissioner, Shankar Bidri, for good measure, defended his men in words that might have been borrowed by the Americans defending their action of destroying a village during the Vietnam War.

He said: "People were crawling over each other; there was a likelihood of a stampede. To prevent a greater injury, you have to cause a small injury."

Contrast this with South Africa last summer where FIFA had the sort of control a Government may envy.

In South Africa, FIFA behaved as if it was the almighty Vatican of sport. It was clear to anyone who followed the tournament that this was a completely FIFA run operation.

FIFA had allowed South Africa to use its World Cup franchise, but FIFA was running the show.

In effect, for the South African World Cup, FIFA moved its offices from Zurich to Johannesburg and other cities of South Africa, and controlled every aspect of the World Cup down to the ticketing. Locals on the ground had very limited input into the whole thing.

Indeed, on certain issues, FIFA succeeded in having a status even higher than that of the South African Government, bending it to its will for the competition.

So, as part of the price for hosting the World Cup, the South African Government was forced to amend its laws.

This meant that those who committed football related offences were tried quickly. In a country where it can take years for a case to come to court, such football related offences came to court in matter of weeks.

FIFA made it clear it was this was price South Africa had to pay to receive this unique sports brand.

So pervasive were FIFA controls that they resulted in a leading South African saying he felt the World Cup meant FIFA had occupied his country.

Strong words, but it reflected the feelings of many in that country. But so desperate was South Africa to host the competition, that it was prepared to pay any price.

It knew this was not a permanent occupation like that of bygone colonial powers.

After all, what were a few weeks of misery for the eternal glory of becoming the first country in Africa to host the tournament?

The 2012 London Olympics will not see quite such oppressive IOC control. But they have seen legislation to make sure that ambush marketing regarding use of the IOC symbols, such as the rings, or anything connected with the word Olympics, however remotely, is punishable by law.

In addition, London will have to prepare itself to receive the Games. This includes giving the IOC a "clean city", so that there are no rivals to the IOC and its sponsors and also having Olympic lanes during the Games to facilitate transport for the Olympic family.

The ICC can exercise nothing like this sort of control over this World Cup or, for that matter, international cricket in general.

This lack of control was brutally revealed when, a day after the tournament began, David Becker, head of the ICC's legal department, wrote a letter to Sharad Pawar, chairman of the central Organising Committee.

The letter warned the Indians not to try and sell tickets at the box office as there could be "chaos and physical injury", a warning the organisers in Bangalore clearly ignored.

It also expressed the fear that relationships with sponsors were at "breaking point." So bad, indeed, that they might demand some of their money back.

Given that Pawar is also President of the ICC, and therefore Becker's boss, the letter was unprecedented.

The World Cup may be the ICC World Cup, just as the South African World Cup was the FIFA World Cup as FIFA never stopped reminding us, but, unlike the football variety, this is not a franchise operation.

On the ground, the Indian feudal cricket barons run their own stadiums and grounds much as they do normally. The ICC can complain and wring its hands but, unlike FIFA, it cannot bend Indian cricket, let alone Indian government, to its will.

Of course, it is complicated in cricket in that the ICC, with its English origins, does not control world cricket in the same way that Fifa, which was set up by the French, controls world football.

Also, the Indians are the economic powerhouse of the game. They contribute 80 per cent of world cricket income through television fees earned from the huge market provided by their 1.3 billion cricket mad population. And world cricket could not function without Indian money.

What is even more fascinating is how Indians react to foreign criticism.

Their defence is that India has its own way of doing things and the world does not understand. So the Bangalore police commissioner said: "The Indian situation is very different. It is very difficult for people in America and Europe to understand."

This was almost a repeat of the line taken by the Commonwealth Games official, Lalit Bhanot, now behind bars.

When asked about the lack of hygiene in the village he uttered the immortal line that hygiene standards in India were different to those in the West.

So what would you have? A FIFA style totalitarian control of an event, or an ICC laissez-faire system?

South Africa could argue that the World Cup has boosted its image.

In contrast, India with an economy that is growing at 10 per cent a year and an acknowledged power, has seen two successive sporting events tarnish its shiny, new-India image.

The conclusion seems obvious. If you are going to use sport to boost your image, make sure it is a tightly controlled operation.

Otherwise, like India, far from doing any good, it may harm the country. But then again, if India wins the Cricket World Cup for the first time since 1983, it will not care what the world thinks.

http://insidethegames.biz/blogs/12146


Perhaps this is the real question from this article: we've seen how India has fared with weak sporting bodies overseeing their preparations (not greatly), but would the IOC or even FIFA if India were a bigger footballing nation tame the corruption and disorganisation we've seen on the Subcontinent recently. Does this article, whilst ripping into India, actually offer a glimse of hope for their future Olympic bid by suggesting the big boys (FIFA and the IOC) wouldn't let things get out of control in such a way?

Lots we could talk about from this; but it is shocking that so many of the Delhi OC are now in prison! :o

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Yet another reason why a potential Delhi 2020 bid should be considered simply ridiculous...

If the main man behind some of the most notable Opening Ceremonies in recent Olympic history has such strident criticism, and considering the almost chaotic disability of the Indians to get anything organised in time from local suppliers for the Delhi CGs (with the added problem of corruption charges), well they have about as much chance of getting a successful bid up in the next three or four Olympic bid cycles as FIFA has of passing an ethics exam.

Here's the thing: if there was no transfer of knowledge from India's previous hostings of the Asian Games (like in 1982 which did not have adverse reviews) to this one, I think that similarly, there will be no transfer of knowledge of the harm done by stiffing foreign contractors, to future bidding committees. And the future bid committees will be blind as a bat insofar as their country's transgressions connected with Delhi 2010 and will cry "discrimination, wolf and all that."

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