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Dubai can win the 2020 Olympic Games


Dubai2020

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My class and I completed a detailed research project on whether Dubai could host the 2020 Olympic Games.

We truly believe it is feasible, and would love for you to read our proposal and comment!

It's almost 11MB but it is worth the download, as it includes stadium designs, pictograms and logos, as well as written submissions on:

- the existing enthusiasm for the games

- is Dubai palatable for visitors?

- whether the UAE is a sporting nation

- Olympic budget

- transportation improvements

- if we have an existing stable infrastructure

- whether the UAE is politically stable

- what security measures need to be taken

Download link below:

http://www.mediafire.com/?zkmnznn5tyz

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So...how will Dubai deal with the attendance of an Israeli team?

Unless every Middle Eastern/Arabic candidate for an Olympics (as well as the World Cup) can demonstrate they will provide the requisite security and sporting opportunities for Israeli athletes and officials they will be behind the eight ball. The IOC will never ever let the threat of a Munich repeat overshadow a bidding host city, and considering that Alex Gilady is not just an significant power behind Rogge's throne on the IOC but he also an Israeli, any Middle Eastern/Arabic bid will have to solve that very thorny political and security issue.

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So...how will Dubai deal with the attendance of an Israeli team?

Unless every Middle Eastern/Arabic candidate for an Olympics (as well as the World Cup) can demonstrate they will provide the requisite security and sporting opportunities for Israeli athletes and officials they will be behind the eight ball. The IOC will never ever let the threat of a Munich repeat overshadow a bidding host city, and considering that Alex Gilady is not just an significant power behind Rogge's throne on the IOC but he also an Israeli, any Middle Eastern/Arabic bid will have to solve that very thorny political and security issue.

We addressed this issue in our proposal: the UAE denied an Isreali tennis player a visa for the Barclay's tennis tounament in 2009, but after backlash they ensured they granted her the visa in the 2010 tournament. Also, there is a record of a number of Israeli players being granted sports visas here, although often they are under movement restrictions.

The same Israeli player had serious security threats when she played in New Zealand a short time before she was denied a visa here. These problems are not confined to the Middle East.

It is certainly an issue which needs to be addressed, as you said. The UAE copped bad press, a fine, sponsors dropped out, and a prominent player boycotted a subsequent tournament following the denial of the visa to this player. We've experienced the consequences of trying to exclude Israel in international sporting events - surely, we wouldn't risk it again.

Sheikh Mohammed is certainly a progressive leader, he said this year "Sports breaks down barriers between people", I think we are heading in the right direction.

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We addressed this issue in our proposal: the UAE denied an Isreali tennis player a visa for the Barclay's tennis tounament in 2009, but after backlash they ensured they granted her the visa in the 2010 tournament. Also, there is a record of a number of Israeli players being granted sports visas here, although often they are under movement restrictions.

The same Israeli player had serious security threats when she played in New Zealand a short time before she was denied a visa here. These problems are not confined to the Middle East.

Snipped...

Your country is happy to allow Israeli's to come over on sporting visas but then can be liable to movement restrictions?

Frankly that is beyond the pale, and the IOC should never take any bid from the UAE serious until such discriminatory practices are removed.

I wonder if there are similar discriminatory laws in place for what women can wear in beach volleyball, or football, or triathlon?

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I wonder if there are similar discriminatory laws in place for what women can wear in beach volleyball, or football, or triathlon?

I have a solution: the female athletes will 'wear digitized' chadors and burkhas' for the Arab broadcasts. Problem solved!! :lol:

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Last thing we need to see is Misty May Treanor covered up.

And it would be very hard for the female track athletes to run in a burkha. And what happens with the female basketball players? Do they were headgear and play in their respective team jackets? God forbid that they allow themselves to show skin, since its a sin in the Islamic world.

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Last thing we need to see is Misty May Treanor covered up.

And it would be very hard for the female track athletes to run in a burkha. And what happens with the female basketball players? Do they were headgear and play in their respective team jackets? God forbid that they allow themselves to show skin, since its a sin in the Islamic world.

That's why I said it's merely a 'digital enhancement' for the Arab world coverage. But the rest of the world, gets it in their true skimpy outfits. ;)

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That's why I said it's merely a 'digital enhancement' for the Arab world coverage. But the rest of the world, gets it in their true skimpy outfits. ;)

Hopefully the Arab TV stations would use 21st century technology, but I somehow doubt it.

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Last thing we need to see is Misty May Treanor covered up.

And it would be very hard for the female track athletes to run in a burkha. And what happens with the female basketball players? Do they were headgear and play in their respective team jackets? God forbid that they allow themselves to show skin, since its a sin in the Islamic world.

Come on, you obviously haven't spent any time in the UAE. Yes, most muslim women cover their head (in this region, although you will notice most muslim women in Egypt and many in Morocco do not). However, it is certainly not required by non-muslim women in this country. Yes, you are asked to wear respectful clothing (shoulders and knees covered) but that said many don't and there seems to be no consequences. At the beach, women wear the same old skimpy bikinis and when playing beach volleyball they wear the same revealing clothes too.

It is a matter of are you willing to respect the local customs of the country you are visiting, just as you would expect people to respect your own customs when they visit yours.

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there are a lot of valid question being raised. i know it part of the Arabic culture. but the question above does raise a valid point. i remember it was such a big issue for doha when they hosted the asian games.

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Any would-be hosting Arabs should also expect that NOT all visitors may respect their local culture...and NOT out of disrepsect or what; but that it is NOT practiced. Some of their customs are quite onerous and when they host an INTERNATIONAL event, they have to give visitors some leeway and NOT make the visit so strict as to become unpleasant for the visitors.

After all, it is a sporting event we are talking about...not a visit to a church, mosque or synagogue!! To be so persistent on their prudish customs in a SPORTING event will win them NO new friends. It SHOULD be a 2-way learning street...not just for non-muslims to become more cognizant of the muslim cult...but for muslims as well to be MORE TOLERANT of non-muslims since Islam is the MOST CLOSE/NARROW-mided, INTOLERANT cult there is today and NOT everybody buys into the "Prophet-is-everything' baloney. :rolleyes:

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  • 3 weeks later...

Any would-be hosting Arabs should also expect that NOT all visitors may respect their local culture...and NOT out of disrepsect or what; but that it is NOT practiced. Some of their customs are quite onerous and when they host an INTERNATIONAL event, they have to give visitors some leeway and NOT make the visit so strict as to become unpleasant for the visitors.

After all, it is a sporting event we are talking about...not a visit to a church, mosque or synagogue!! To be so persistent on their prudish customs in a SPORTING event will win them NO new friends. It SHOULD be a 2-way learning street...not just for non-muslims to become more cognizant of the muslim cult...but for muslims as well to be MORE TOLERANT of non-muslims since Islam is the MOST CLOSE/NARROW-mided, INTOLERANT cult there is today and NOT everybody buys into the "Prophet-is-everything' baloney. :rolleyes:

I'm sorry but how difficult is it to make an effort to not kiss and grope in public when you are visiting an Islamic country? We are not talking about having the Olympics in Saudi Arabia - yes, there I would say it is difficult to expect international visitors to follow local customs. The UAE, however, is the most liberal, welcoming and open of the Islamic states. The UAE has been welcoming foreign visitors for decades, and the expatriate population is 80%. Clearly, they have made these 'leeways' you talk of, as we all live there happily!

A reply like yours highlights only your own extreme intolerance, as it is clear that you a) have never lived (probably never even visited) an Islamic state and B) are basing all of your opinions on your experience with Islam in your country's media and your limited encounters with muslims (probably not even from a range of Islamic nations).

Australian media has been Muslim-bashing for years, and I cringe when I open another news story that picks up on only the negative or extreme aspects of the religion. Living in Dubai, where people are only happy to open up and discuss their religion (in a NON NARROW-MINDED OR PUSHY FASHION) I have learned that Islam is a religion that does not condone the actions of those who have made the media with their extreme views. They do not dispise Westerners. Every Friday they go to the mosque for prayer and no they do not talk about infidels as you may think! Some topics for their Friday prayers have been:

- Mother's day is coming up, but every day should be mother's day

- Surround yourselves with good-hearted friends and always help a friend in need

- Make an effort to maintain the Arabic langugage as it is the language of our culture and religion

- It is not the nanny's job to look after your children, you need to take responsibility of your own children: give them boundaries, maintain discipline, bring them up as good people

I work in an international school where islamic and non-islamic students are friends, and have the opportunity to see how similar they really are. Thank goodness they have this chance to not be narrow-minded about religion and religious differences.

I am so thankful to have lived in Dubai, and not stuck in Australia with the closed and narrow-minded opinions of Islam there based on such limited experience with muslims.

You're right - this should be a two-way learning street. And contrary to your belief, you have just as much to learn as the muslims do.

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I'm sorry but how difficult is it to make an effort to not kiss and grope in public when you are visiting an Islamic country?

I know this subject is delicate and I don't want to offend anyone. I agree with you in this, it's not difficult not to show PDA, but it's not difficult either to take off the veil, for example, when you visit Western countries, in which entering certain places with the head covered is not considered correct, and yet lots of Muslim women wear their veils.

So, OK, if non-Muslim people visit Muslim countries, I also think they must respect the country's culture and law, but also the other way round, when Muslim people visit non-Muslim countries, they must respect that country, too. Sadly, this does not usually happen, and Western countries need to take measures in order to be respected. A clear example is France, who forbade burkas and niqabs some months ago.

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well i wont talk anything about Islam if its so narrow minded or not... but the countries live the religion combined with their cultures....

Arabs are more conservative about religion. the way they live is mostly is their cultural back ground. Like the behave to women. tell me any country whichs population believes in Islam is modern and in democracy and tolerate to others.

Its not Dubai or Doha... sorry for that...

Arabs live Islam in their own ways. even they make the holliest place on earth Mecca into a money making touristic area.... Its not Islam as we learn and live for centuries....Even they do not involve or say anything about Gazze and the crises happened there.... Islam says protect to the poors and help them... they just living in a dream world and using the power of money.

Its funny to shout at people who gonna forbid Burkha ( even its not a religiosn thng but a afgan land cultural dress) while they force their guest to wear so closed or look at the ones not wearing like they are devils.....

thank god that i born in Istanbul. Thank god that im a turk where the Islamic Renaissance starts and blossoms at 1923...

sorry guys.. im really sorry but i dont support the countries or cities just using the power of money but has nothing else. even i can do the olympics at home if u can give me 10 billion euros .. thats not olympism....

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Arabs are more conservative about religion. the way they live is mostly is their cultural back ground. Like the behave to women. tell me any country whichs population believes in Islam is modern and in democracy and tolerate to others.

It's not Islam itself, but the way Muslim countries behave regarding religion issues. Both Turkey and Irak are Muslim, but they are very different countries. There are lots of things you can do in Turkey that you couldn't do in Irak because "religion does not allow it". And my question is, is there any Holy Muslim writing that forbids showing PDA or that forces women to wear veils? I don't think so, because some Muslim countries have laws against that but others haven't...

I think it's similar to what happens in the Roman-Catholic church, why can't a woman be a priestess? They say it's because the Bible says ... no, neither the Bible nor any other writing says a word about this. Other kinds of Christianism let women be priestesses and there is no problem about that, but there must be some hidden interests somewhere :rolleyes:

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It's not Islam itself, but the way Muslim countries behave regarding religion issues. Both Turkey and Irak are Muslim, but they are very different countries. There are lots of things you can do in Turkey that you couldn't do in Irak because "religion does not allow it". And my question is, is there any Holy Muslim writing that forbids showing PDA or that forces women to wear veils? I don't think so, because some Muslim countries have laws against that but others haven't...

I think it's similar to what happens in the Roman-Catholic church, why can't a woman be a priestess? They say it's because the Bible says ... no, neither the Bible nor any other writing says a word about this. Other kinds of Christianism let women be priestesses and there is no problem about that, but there must be some hidden interests somewhere :rolleyes:

thats what i said.... Arab lands are too much conservative about women in social life.. but you cant see it in Turkic ones or east asian ones. Its written in Qoran to close some parts of female body.. but it doesnt say anythin u have to use this kind of things or else... even black burka kind thing has a history in middle east. once in ottoman empire in 18 th century women used mostly colored and more open clothes and fashionate ones. but after an important minister who came from syria with his wife using black burka it becomes also fashion in Istanbul streets too... and after that it spreads to all empire and women begin to use it more.. In anatolia also women dont use Turban ( mushroom shaped head scarf), but also it comes from arabic lands as a fashion ( which is horrible for me )in near past and now women start to use it...

these kind of things are not Islam or dogmas of religion. its just culturel passing through countries and cultures. like arab people are watching turkish serials on prime time nowadays.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I think it doesn't matter if you're gay or not. Kissing in public in the UAE is not considered correct, but I don't what would happened if it was 2 boys or 2 girls kissing each other instead of a boy and a girl :unsure:

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I'm sorry but how difficult is it to make an effort to not kiss and grope in public when you are visiting an Islamic country? We are not talking about having the Olympics in Saudi Arabia - yes, there I would say it is difficult to expect international visitors to follow local customs. The UAE, however, is the most liberal, welcoming and open of the Islamic states. The UAE has been welcoming foreign visitors for decades, and the expatriate population is 80%. Clearly, they have made these 'leeways' you talk of, as we all live there happily!

A reply like yours highlights only your own extreme intolerance, as it is clear that you a) have never lived (probably never even visited) an Islamic state and B) are basing all of your opinions on your experience with Islam in your country's media and your limited encounters with muslims (probably not even from a range of Islamic nations).

Australian media has been Muslim-bashing for years, and I cringe when I open another news story that picks up on only the negative or extreme aspects of the religion. Living in Dubai, where people are only happy to open up and discuss their religion (in a NON NARROW-MINDED OR PUSHY FASHION) I have learned that Islam is a religion that does not condone the actions of those who have made the media with their extreme views. They do not dispise Westerners. Every Friday they go to the mosque for prayer and no they do not talk about infidels as you may think! Some topics for their Friday prayers have been:

- Mother's day is coming up, but every day should be mother's day

- Surround yourselves with good-hearted friends and always help a friend in need

- Make an effort to maintain the Arabic langugage as it is the language of our culture and religion

- It is not the nanny's job to look after your children, you need to take responsibility of your own children: give them boundaries, maintain discipline, bring them up as good people

I work in an international school where islamic and non-islamic students are friends, and have the opportunity to see how similar they really are. Thank goodness they have this chance to not be narrow-minded about religion and religious differences.

I am so thankful to have lived in Dubai, and not stuck in Australia with the closed and narrow-minded opinions of Islam there based on such limited experience with muslims.

You're right - this should be a two-way learning street. And contrary to your belief, you have just as much to learn as the muslims do.

Dubai2020, u r right. BAD Australia, Bad! BAd!!

Unfortunately, Dubai, I am NOT Australian and live what? 8,000mi from Oz??

When I had dinner at La Cupole in Paris, we sat beside this very rather youngish...obviously very western Turkish couple. Of course, discussion went to islamic practices. And the woman absolutely derided the way the more conservative Arab socities treat their womenfolk. She was aghast...even as a, granted western-educated, moslem woman.

BTW, Dubai2020, pick up if you can the July issue of VANITY FAIR magazine. British journalist Maureen Dowd pens an on-the-spot and scathingly funny article about the way the Saudis treat their womenfolk...even after her very special visit to the kingdom as a guest of a highly-placed Saudi prince.

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Dubai2020, u r right. BAD Australia, Bad! BAd!!

Unfortunately, Dubai, I am NOT Australian and live what? 8,000mi from Oz??

When I had dinner at La Cupole in Paris, we sat beside this very rather youngish...obviously very western Turkish couple. Of course, discussion went to islamic practices. And the woman absolutely derided the way the more conservative Arab socities treat their womenfolk. She was aghast...even as a, granted western-educated, moslem woman.

BTW, Dubai2020, pick up if you can the July issue of VANITY FAIR magazine. British journalist Maureen Dowd pens an on-the-spot and scathingly funny article about the way the Saudis treat their womenfolk...even after her very special visit to the kingdom as a guest of a highly-placed Saudi prince.

Maureen Dowd is an American, and a columnist for the New York Times. She did, however, write the piece for Vanity Fair.

The mere existence of these debates suggests that Olympics in the Arab world as early as 2020 are probably not workable.

They are not workable ever.

It's not Islam itself, but the way Muslim countries behave regarding religion issues. Both Turkey and Irak are Muslim, but they are very different countries. There are lots of things you can do in Turkey that you couldn't do in Irak because "religion does not allow it". And my question is, is there any Holy Muslim writing that forbids showing PDA or that forces women to wear veils? I don't think so, because some Muslim countries have laws against that but others haven't...

I think it's similar to what happens in the Roman-Catholic church, why can't a woman be a priestess? They say it's because the Bible says ... no, neither the Bible nor any other writing says a word about this. Other kinds of Christianism let women be priestesses and there is no problem about that, but there must be some hidden interests somewhere :rolleyes:

Islam, Christianity and Judaism are all complete and utter garbage. I despise all three.

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