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NYC 2024 or 2028


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All I'm saying is that the earliest chance for a probable NYC bid...if the USOC wants to work with them...remember the USOC did NOT want to work with Bloomberg's crew for 2016...would probably be 2022 for maybe a 2032 run. I believe the USOC will be occupied with other matters before then.

We don't know that. I can't see them sitting out 2020, 2022 and 2024, but I think if they don't go for 2022, they surely will be looking at 2024.

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I would think that Gymnastics would take place at Nassau Coliseum along with indoor volleyball. That would leave the Garden and the Brooklyn arena for basketball. Unless of course, the plan is for wrestling, judo, fencing and other indoor based sports to take place inside Nassau Coliseum.

I think Madison Square Garden would host Baskteball and the new arena in Brooklyn would host Gymnastics - or vice versa. Either way, I can't see those two sports getting too far from the city, whether to Nassau or to Newark / The Meadowlands.

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barclays center should be a beauty. it was designed by frank gehry.

dang... i read it wrong. seems that mr. gehry is no longer involved with this project. the architecture firm involved is now minneapolis based Ellerbe Becket

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The truth is that the USOC is probably unsure of what it will bid for when. We know 2020 is out. Blackmun has said that they are open to a bid in 2022, but that's not a guarantee they will submit one. If the U.S. doesn't host in 2022 (either because they didn't bid or bid and lost), there's no way to know whether they would sit out 2024 or not. I have not read anything to suggest that the USOC is more interested in Winter Games than Summer Games, so Baron's theory that the USOC's focus is on 2022 or 2026 doesn't really make sense to me. He may be right, but there's absolutely no evidence to support that statement. The only thing we know for sure is that the soonest they would consider a bid is 2022.

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You've got a fantastic new stadium, but can it be converted to athletics, and is it the best option? Would it be better to build a temporary stadium in a location which offers more scope for a compact Olympics and a regenerative legacy and use Meadowlands for football (soccer), or do you go with what you've got as an Olympic Stadium?

Very much like London 2012's early days when the new Wembley was rejected in favour of an Olympic park in the East End.

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I was under the impression it was in New York. Apologies.

No, it's actually in New Jersey. And like I've also pointed out earlier in the thread, it wouldn't be in-line with the Olympic Charter to ponder it because of that fact. But like you said; soccer prelims? Sure, why not.

And interesting just like you pointed out about London's 2012 early days about the new Wembley stadium being rejected, I could see the Meadowlands being Wembley for a possible later New York proposal. Not to mention the fact that Meadowlands is not even in New York State.

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Very much like London 2012's early days when the new Wembley was rejected in favour of an Olympic park in the East End.

Though technically Wembley rejected the Olympics (well, athletics) rather than the other way round.

If Meadowlands could be converted for athletics it seems the best option - but also probably means it's regular tenants are locked out of their own stadium for the best part of a year.

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Though technically Wembley rejected the Olympics (well, athletics) rather than the other way round.

If Meadowlands could be converted for athletics it seems the best option - but also probably means it's regular tenants are locked out of their own stadium for the best part of a year.

I think for the simple fact that Meadowlands hosts home games for two NFL teams, it would be a very tough sell to the tenants. Adding on to the issue of the stadium not even being in New York state, let alone New York City. I think it would best used for soccer/football semis and finals.

Soldier Field in Chicago was nice, and owned by the Chicago Park District, but converting the relatively new stadium for T&F just wasn't feasible. On top of that, was the issue of Soldier Field only seating 61,500 people (Meadowlands seats 82,500). I don't know if a future NYC bid would strongly consider a temporary stadium plan like Chicago. I think it comes down to where to put it.

What were NYC 2012's final stadium plans? I know things changed last minute.

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What were NYC 2012's final stadium plans? I know things changed last minute.

The final plan was to build a new baseball stadium for the Mets in Queens in the existing parking lot of Shea Stadium. This new stadium would have been used by the Mets from 2009 onwards. Then, in 2012, the stadium was to be converted to T&F while the Mets played in Yankee Stadium.

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Though technically Wembley rejected the Olympics (well, athletics) rather than the other way round.

If Meadowlands could be converted for athletics it seems the best option - but also probably means it's regular tenants are locked out of their own stadium for the best part of a year.

That's the problem you have with any major USA Bid for the Summer. The bid city would have to build a new venue in the hopes it becomes a venue with a regular tenant down the line (I.E. Atlanta Olympic Stadium becoming Turner Field) that would be suitable for athletics. The NFL stadiums would be used for soccer, because it's proven that all NFL stadium have hosted soccer games before. It has never been proven if any NFL stadium can be converted for Athletics. Some can host basketball (most of the Dome Stadiums) and two can host baseball: Miami and Oakland (although Miami is getting a new stadium for the Marlins soon).

Wasn't the Chicago plan to convert the Olympic stadium into Track and Field?

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The final plan was to build a new baseball stadium for the Mets in Queens in the existing parking lot of Shea Stadium. This new stadium would have been used by the Mets from 2009 onwards. Then, in 2012, the stadium was to be converted to T&F while the Mets played in Yankee Stadium.

Thanks for the info. That plan doesn't sound too good, especially given the disdain of Atlanta's stadium plan (which is now Turner Field). I like Citi Field (Mets new stadium that opened last year), and it would have probably ruined the park if T&F were added.

24sport-Citi-Field-001.jpg

Bottom line, baseball parks should not be considered for T&F Olympic stadiums. NFL football stadiums are difficult enough for accommodating. Baseball just seems even more awkward (plus it isn't even an Olympic sport anymore, so it wouldn't even have an Olympic legacy).

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I do think that a Winter Bid is easier for the USOC than a Summer Bid due to the track and field issue alone. That way you could use the football stadium for the opening and closing ceremonies and medals. With any Summer bid, you would have to figure out where the Track and Field events would take place.

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Wasn't the Chicago plan to convert the Olympic stadium into Track and Field?

Convert from what? Their plan was to create a temporary stadium with 80,000 seats in Washington Park (near the University of Chicago), and reduce it down to 5,000-10,000 seats for an amphitheater. Possibly 50,000 seats were going to be made using wheelchair parts, and would have been recycled post games. It was never really clear to me whether they planned on keeping the track and field. Facilities at the U of C would have been used for warm-ups.

Renders -

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Also, a temporary Aquatics Center would have been built nearby, and the warm-up pool would have been used by a local high school.

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I do think that a Winter Bid is easier for the USOC than a Summer Bid due to the track and field issue alone. That way you could use the football stadium for the opening and closing ceremonies and medals. With any Summer bid, you would have to figure out where the Track and Field events would take place.

I think it is kind of a wash between cities capability of hosting a Summer Games vs. Winter Games. Too many environmental conditions are needed for a Winter Games, and there are not many large U.S. cities with football stadiums of (60,000+) close enough to mountains that can host the ski events.

Now, many on here would agree that a Winter bid would be easier than a summer bid, because the competition is more fierce for the Summer Games, as more cities/countries around the world are becoming capable to host. Rogge said himself that only 15 or so countries could conceivably host the Winter Olympics.

So the proposed Olympic Stadium was going to be an amphitheater. Interesting.

Still though, finding a place to put track and field is still a major problem for any US bid.

I agree. Especially given that T&F is becoming less popular in collegiate sports. Scholarship money has increasingly gone to American Football, Baseball, Basketball, and even Soccer, but most schools have reduced their funding for T&F sports. The U.S. will continue to slip in T&F events at the Olympics unless things change.

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I agree. Especially given that T&F is becoming less popular in collegiate sports. Scholarship money has increasingly gone to American Football, Baseball, Basketball, and even Soccer, but most schools have reduced their funding for T&F sports. The U.S. will continue to slip in T&F events at the Olympics unless things change.

Yep. I've noticed the increasing number of former track athletes playing football in recent years. During NFL and college games, I've noticed the announcers mentioning "Player X" as a former track athlete. I don't know if it's the same for baseball, basketball and soccer.

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I would say no doubt that football has become huge on the college level. Basketball and baseball have continued to hold steady, but I would say college basketball has definitely received more "market share" for funding/scholarships.

Soccer has become more popular, and my guess is that it will slowly continue. Even though track and field is more popular on the college level, soccer could be taking some dollars away as it becomes more mainstream. It will be interesting to research this a bit.

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You could also look at these sports from a marketing prospective as well. The United States is a land of Superstars. The NFL, NBA, NHL and Baseball have tons. Even individual sports have their own Superstars. In Cycling, there's Lance Armstrong. In golf, there's Tiger Woods. In NASCAR, there are Carl Edwards and Jeff Gordon and to a lesser degree Dale Jr., Jimmie Johnson and Tony Stewart. In Indy Car, there's Danica Patrick (she's recently made the move to the NASCAR Junior Circuit). In tennis it's (to a lesser degree) the Williams Sisters and Andy Roddick, although the true Superstar is the Swiss born Roger Federer. Snowboarding has Shaun White, speedskating has Apolo Anton Ohno and Swimming has Michael Phelps. Skiing has (to a lesser degree) Lindsay Vonn.

Track and Field has Usain Bolt, but he's Jamaican. Track and Field currently lacks a true American born superstar. Oh sure there are very talented American track athletes like Sanya Richards, Tyson Gay, Allison Felix and Jeremy Wariner, but none of them are household names like Woods, Armstrong, Edwards, Gordon or even Phelps. Track and field has had the likes of Marion Jones, Michael Johnson, Carl Lewis, Jackie Joyner Kersee and Dan O'Brien and Lewis was the closest thing to a household name that sport has ever had.

With some of the individual sports I have mentioned its easy to promote and market around that person. Carl Edwards is in those AFLAC commercials with the duck that is voiced by Gilbert Gottfreid. Michael Phelps does the Subway Commercials with Jared. Before he had his numerous affairs, Tiger Woods had plenty of commercials. Lance Armstrong is in a beer commercial. Track and Field does not have that person.

I think it plays a factor into why the United States does not have a large track and field only stadium and why they have never hosted a World Championships. You can't get 70,000 Americans to watch a bunch of their own athletes run in a non Olympics without a major superstar. Look at the Masters that happened this past weekend. People wanted to see how Tiger does. I know that same can be said for Swimming (in that they have never hosted a World Championships and that they don't have adequate facilities), but at least USA Swimming can market the sport around Michael Phelps. Track and Field does not have that.

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I know that same can be said for Swimming (in that they have never hosted a World Championships and that they don't have adequate facilities), but at least USA Swimming can market the sport around Michael Phelps. Track and Field does not have that.

The United States is hosting the Pan Pacific Swimming Championships this year in Irvine, California in August. I've already got my tickets. The Pan Pacs are a major international Olympic caliber event held once every four years. The U.S. last hosted in 1995 (back then it was a biennial event in the odd years). As for the FINA World Aquatics Championships, Stanford University in Palo Alto, CA, I think, could definitely host. Montreal 2005 built the their Aquatic park expressly for their hosting and Melbourne 2007 built a temporary indoor pool in the Rod Laver Arena for the swimming and synchro portion of their hosting. Diving and water polo were held in the Melbourne Sports and Aquatic center and Open Water was held at a beach. The U.S. could definitely host the FINA Worlds, we've just never bid (but I wish we would - preferably in Palo Alto).

Wikipedia Entry for the Pan Pacs

Pan Pacific Swimming 2010 Website

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The United States is hosting the Pan Pacific Swimming Championships this year in Irvine, California in August. I've already got my tickets. The Pan Pacs are a major international Olympic caliber event held once every four years. The U.S. last hosted in 1995 (back then it was a biennial event in the odd years). As for the FINA World Aquatics Championships, Stanford University in Palo Alto, CA, I think, could definitely host. Montreal 2005 built the their Aquatic park expressly for their hosting and Melbourne 2007 built a temporary indoor pool in the Rod Laver Arena for the swimming and synchro portion of their hosting. Diving and water polo were held in the Melbourne Sports and Aquatic center and Open Water was held at a beach. The U.S. could definitely host the FINA Worlds, we've just never bid (but I wish we would - preferably in Palo Alto).

Wikipedia Entry for the Pan Pacs

Pan Pacific Swimming 2010 Website

Well then it looks like USA Swimming has another advantage over track and field. I assume that Michael Phelps will be there.

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