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U.S. Winter Bid for 2022 or 2026


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Montreal / Lake Placid would be awesome. Is it going to happen? Probably not. But that doesn't mean it isn't fun to think about.

Note to the naysayers: Every bid has serious problems. There just aren't that many places with (1) amazing skiing, (2) a need for multiple ice areas, (3) infrastructure to support 1.21 gigawatt capable media centers, and (4) billions of extra dollars to spend on all of the above.

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Montreal / Lake Placid would be awesome. Is it going to happen? Probably not. But that doesn't mean it isn't fun to think about.

Note to the naysayers: Every bid has serious problems. There just aren't that many places with (1) amazing skiing, (2) a need for multiple ice areas, (3) infrastructure to support 1.21 gigawatt capable media centers, and (4) billions of extra dollars to spend on all of the above.

I get it now.. every bid sucks, so it's just a matter of finding the bid that sucks the least.

No question every bid will come with some negatives. Don't know I'd go so far as to call them serious problems. The question is can that bid either overcome those negatives or at least do their best to minimize them. There's no perfect bid out there, certainly not in the United States where all of the prospective bid cities have issues they need to deal with and might not be able to find a solution to. Although it's worth noting.. among the 4 US winter candidates, every single one of them has a convention center likely capable of handle the world's media without the need for Doc Brown to re-invent the flux capacitor to make it work. As opposed to Lake Placid.. who offers a high school. I'd call that more than a serious problem.

Call me a naysayer if you want.. I have no problem discussing a Lake Placid bid for fun. But again, if someone is trying to present it as a viable possibility, hypothetical or otherwise, permit me to look for flaws in the plan just like everyone else has long done with every other bid. As nice as another Lake Placid Olympics may sound in theory, in reality, issues like an almost complete and total lack of infrastructure save for a few existing venues go beyond 'serious problems.' And if you want to envision a Montreal/Lake Placid Olympics for fun, far be it from me to stop anyone from doing that. However, if we're going to play by the IOC's rules (and who knows, maybe they'll change their tune on bi-national bids at some point), the odds of it actually happen are not "probably not," they are a pretty solid zero chance of it happening.

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Also, how would Lake Placid afford it? Even a bill of $1 billion would be about $2000 a person.

Lord David, Gromit and Zekel will finance it.

I know your joking, but how did Lake Placid get the initial finance of 168 million for the 1980 Games? It was State wide taxpayer funding, donations, corporate sponsors and so forth.

The same case would be if Lake Placid was hosting again. You generate funds from a special State run Olympic tax for say 500 million, matched by Federal funds and of course corporate funding, which would definitely much greater than it was in 1980.

Set the expected costs at 1.5 billion and add around a billion in contingency funds should cost overruns arise.

As for Montreal, scrap it. Even Albany should be scrapped.

At the most it should be Lake Placid, Saranac Lake, Tupper Lake, Plattsburgh and maybe Potsdam. Add Gore Mountain in the mix. This is of course if the intimate Tri-Lakes region is not possible.

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Also, how would Lake Placid afford it? Even a bill of $1 billion would be about $2000 a person.

I wasn't aware there was a geographical limit on which sponsors could support an Olympics in the USA??

Clearly as with all US bids there will be 'partners' who will sponsor venues during and after the games which will contribute to the pot for funding venues ..... a number of College venues come with benefactor donations to build venues and I'm certain there will be no reason why this couldn't continue

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I know your joking, but how did Lake Placid get the initial finance of 168 million for the 1980 Games? It was State wide taxpayer funding, donations, corporate sponsors and so forth.

The same case would be if Lake Placid was hosting again. You generate funds from a special State run Olympic tax for say 500 million, matched by Federal funds and of course corporate funding, which would definitely much greater than it was in 1980.

Set the expected costs at 1.5 billion and add around a billion in contingency funds should cost overruns arise.

Are you starting to see why a future Lake Placid Olympics maybe isn't such a good idea? You're talking about needing nearly ten times the funding that the 1980 Olympics required (which included a huge amount of federal investment, including about $20 million in emergency funds leading up to the start of the Games) and you want to tax New York State to get it? Pretty sure that's not gonna go over so well to put the financial burden on the entire state of New York for an event that will benefit only a tiny fraction of the state's population. Less we forget that the 1980 Olympics finished up in debt, so the risk of that happening in the future is probably that much greater.

I wasn't aware there was a geographical limit on which sponsors could support an Olympics in the USA??

Clearly as with all US bids there will be 'partners' who will sponsor venues during and after the games which will contribute to the pot for funding venues ..... a number of College venues come with benefactor donations to build venues and I'm certain there will be no reason why this couldn't continue

University of British Columbia 2012-13 endowment - C$ 1.16 billion

University of Utah 2011 endowment - $668 million

Brigham Young endowment - $920 million

Clarkson University - $165.1 million

SUNY Potsdam - $18.6 million

SUNY Plattsburgh - $14.1 million

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Are you starting to see why a future Lake Placid Olympics maybe isn't such a good idea? You're talking about needing nearly ten times the funding that the 1980 Olympics required (which included a huge amount of federal investment, including about $20 million in emergency funds leading up to the start of the Games) and you want to tax New York State to get it? Pretty sure that's not gonna go over so well to put the financial burden on the entire state of New York for an event that will benefit only a tiny fraction of the state's population. Less we forget that the 1980 Olympics finished up in debt, so the risk of that happening in the future is probably that much greater.

University of British Columbia 2012-13 endowment - C$ 1.16 billion

University of Utah 2011 endowment - $668 million

Brigham Young endowment - $920 million

Clarkson University - $165.1 million

SUNY Potsdam - $18.6 million

SUNY Plattsburgh - $14.1 million

And how much does the SUNY system have in its entirety .....?

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And how much does the SUNY system have in its entirety .....?

No idea. Not sure there's a number where they calculate the total endowment across all the SUNY schools (as opposed to, say, the University of Texas system where they do calculate a combined number). If you can find that info, I'd love to know what the total is. Not sure how relevant it is though. If the SUNY system is going to use funds to build sports facilities, wouldn't they be better served putting them at 1 of their division 1 schools, not one of the smaller division 2 schools like Potsdam or Plattsburgh?

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I'm going to attempt to swing the thread back to Reno. So is the South Tahoe Convention Center essentially a dead in the water project? What about hosting speed skating at Mackay Stadium or would the ISU likely insist on a covered venue? If the latter is the case then perhaps Reno could either construct a speed skating oval and convert it into a community recreation center post games. Another possibility could be constructing an oval on the University of Nevada campus and converting it to an indoor practice facility for the university's football team (indoor practice facilities are almost a must in college football these days) and an indoor facility for the track and field team.

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I'm going to attempt to swing the thread back to Reno. So is the South Tahoe Convention Center essentially a dead in the water project?

I'm also curious what happens in the South Shore!? The convention center foundation "the hole" has been there for 5ish years now and I've heard recently they have been cleared form whatever bankruptcy hold was happening and are moving forward on the retail part of the complex on HWY 50, though the remaining parts of the 1/2billion dollar hotel/convention center complex are still pending. This is an amazing project oportunity for an alpine area with Olympic dreams.

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UPDATE:

South Lake Tahoe OKs new development for abandoned site - The Sacramento Bee

On Tuesday, South Lake Tahoe City Council members unanimously approved a new plan to phase in development starting with retail and restaurants. The hope is that the hotel and convention center will follow, said City Manager Nancy Kerry.

The plan was put forward by Owens Financial Group, a Walnut Creek firm that foreclosed on much of the property last month. It took over parcels once controlled by Lake Tahoe Development Co., which filed for bankruptcy after spending tens of millions of dollars buying land, demolishing existing structures, winning approval from regulators and starting work on the underground infrastructure.

The development permits – which were hard-won in the strict regulatory climate around the lake at a cost of more than a million dollars – were set to expire this year, and Owens Financial was eager to get started, Kerry said. The group proposed revamping the project to start on the retail phase first.

Lew Feldman, a lawyer representing Owens Financial, said the firm plans to start construction in July and complete it by next summer. Plans for the project, now known as the Chateau, call for 29,000 square feet of mostly single-story retail and restaurant space, with wide walkways and mountain-themed architecture. Building the shops and restaurants will help attract developers for the hotel and convention center, Feldman said.

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Even if I'm not entirely in love of a Reno bid -Personally I prefer Salt Lake City-, at least the arguments presented by that bid are more realistic than a ilogical Lake Placid bid -Which ends in debt, by the way-.



Even if I'm not entirely in love of a Reno bid -Personally I prefer Salt Lake City-, at least the arguments presented by that bid are more realistic than a ilogical Lake Placid bid -Which ends in debt, by the way-.

Sorry I mean Anchorage bid, but still Reno, SLC or Anchorage, these are more realistic bids that another Lake Placid in these 21st. Olympics

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I disagree with SLC. They had their successful games and what with that bid scandal of theirs it's hard to see them getting another games anytime soon. Not to mention that when they inevitably decide for a 2nd games, the IOC will still be reminded with that bid scandal in 1998. It would hamper their bid even if many 2002 venues are still usable and are in place.

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I'm going to attempt to swing the thread back to Reno. So is the South Tahoe Convention Center essentially a dead in the water project? What about hosting speed skating at Mackay Stadium or would the ISU likely insist on a covered venue? If the latter is the case then perhaps Reno could either construct a speed skating oval and convert it into a community recreation center post games. Another possibility could be constructing an oval on the University of Nevada campus and converting it to an indoor practice facility for the university's football team (indoor practice facilities are almost a must in college football these days) and an indoor facility for the track and field team.

They could probably fit a regulation speed skating oval into Mackay (there's a running track around the football field, so it should be big enough), but if they're going to use the stadium for the ceremonies, that probably precludes it from being the speed skating venue, and that's if they were okay with an outdoor venue in the first place.

Even if I'm not entirely in love of a Reno bid -Personally I prefer Salt Lake City-, at least the arguments presented by that bid are more realistic than a ilogical Lake Placid bid -Which ends in debt, by the way-.

Sorry I mean Anchorage bid, but still Reno, SLC or Anchorage, these are more realistic bids that another Lake Placid in these 21st. Olympics

That goes without saying. Well at least it SHOULD go without saying.

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I disagree with SLC. They had their successful games and what with that bid scandal of theirs it's hard to see them getting another games anytime soon. Not to mention that when they inevitably decide for a 2nd games, the IOC will still be reminded with that bid scandal in 1998. It would hamper their bid even if many 2002 venues are still usable and are in place.

See, it's posts like these where I wonder sometimes how some folks want to apply history. Yes, there was a scandal surrounding the Salt Lake bid that the IOC is aware of. My response to that.. so? If Salt Lake were to bid again, would there be concern over another such scandal? Are you worried about some shady dealings from a future organizing committee from Salt Lake as a result? Do you automatically consider that an issue for a future Salt Lake bid?

This is the point I've always brought up about Denver.. yes, they have some ugly history. No question it could come back to haunt them. But the question that needs to be asked is why is their history an issue. That's where it comes into play. I don't think it's an issue simply because it happened and people will remember that it happened.

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Seems like a candidate/city would be less likely to repeat the mistakes of the past in future bids. In fact it would put such a spotlight on the issue that it’d probably be the least likely thing to happen.



If Atlanta hosted in the future I bet all the buss drivers would be over trained on venue routes and supplied with modern mapping technology.


If Munich hosted again it’s likely there wouldn’t be a Palestinian terror attack at the Olympic Village.


If Vancouver hosted in the future they would eliminate unsafe and under padded structural elements in the sliding track.


If Montreal hosted in the future they would probably plan a stadium they could finish, or use an existing one to avoid 40years of Olympic debt.


If Berlin hosts again, they will probably not blanket the games in Nazi flags and symbolism.


And if Denver were to host in the future, they would likely not kick the IOC to the curb after winning the bid……but it would be so awesome if they did!

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Seems like a candidate/city would be less likely to repeat the mistakes of the past in future bids. In fact it would put such a spotlight on the issue that it’d probably be the least likely thing to happen.

If Atlanta hosted in the future I bet all the buss drivers would be over trained on venue routes and supplied with modern mapping technology.

If Munich hosted again it’s likely there wouldn’t be a Palestinian terror attack at the Olympic Village.

If Vancouver hosted in the future they would eliminate unsafe and under padded structural elements in the sliding track.

If Montreal hosted in the future they would probably plan a stadium they could finish, or use an existing one to avoid 40years of Olympic debt.

If Berlin hosts again, they will probably not blanket the games in Nazi flags and symbolism.

And if Denver were to host in the future, they would likely not kick the IOC to the curb after winning the bid……but it would be so awesome if they did!

That's a gross over-simplification of it, but that's the idea. Some of those go without saying. But with Denver, again it's relevant to ask the question of WHY. Why did that happen back in the 1970s? If I'm an IOC member and I see Denver up for bid again, I don't immediately seize up and say "they screwed us before, it could happen again, I shouldn't vote for them." Instead, I educate myself on the circumstances behind what happened. How does that compare to the Denver/Colorado of present? Do I need to fear that what happened with Denver last time could repeat itself? It's certainly a fair question. Denver should be under that kind of microscope. But again, my point to LD was you don't hold a grudge against a city simply because something happen. You examine the circumstances and then you make a judgment.

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With the other situations (such as the bribers and bribetakers in SLC) the people involved have been removed, everyone acknowledges mistakes were made, steps have been put in place to make sure it won't happen again.

Denver is different. The people involved are the citizens of Colorado. They are still there. And in addition to the tree huggers, you've got the Tea Partiers as well. There's nobody who can stand up and say the bond vote was huge mistake, no one to guarantee it will happen again.

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See, it's posts like these where I wonder sometimes how some folks want to apply history. Yes, there was a scandal surrounding the Salt Lake bid that the IOC is aware of. My response to that.. so? If Salt Lake were to bid again, would there be concern over another such scandal? Are you worried about some shady dealings from a future organizing committee from Salt Lake as a result? Do you automatically consider that an issue for a future Salt Lake bid?

This is the point I've always brought up about Denver.. yes, they have some ugly history. No question it could come back to haunt them. But the question that needs to be asked is why is their history an issue. That's where it comes into play. I don't think it's an issue simply because it happened and people will remember that it happened.

I agree with Lord David on this one. The IOC felt cheated, deceived and embarrassed by SLC. That's not something you forget and simply ignore. Would SLC behave differently a second time around? Of course. Could they stage solid Games? Yes. But the IOC is all about relationships and subjective impressions. It's a tall order asking them to return to a city only 24 years later. It's an even taller order when the IOC felt betrayed and publicly humiliated by the city in question.

In other words, I think the IOC would hold a grudge and would punish the children for the sins of the fathers. At least for one cycle.

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^Why is that an argument against Salt Lake, but whenever Denver's omens are brought up, the same argue that it's not really that much of an issue.

Why exactly should the IOC feel cheated, deceived & embarrassed by Salt Lake? It takes two to tango & they were just as guilty for it. Remember, many bidding cities at the time were just as guilty of the same practice. Salt Lake was just the unfortunate one to pay the price for it. Although, one could use those very words against Denver.

Colorado pulled the rug right under the IOC, & had to scramble to find a replacement host on short notice. So if they're gonna "hold a grudge & punish the children for the sins of the fathers", then that would be Denver. Salt Lake's main weakness is moreso their recent hosting than the bribery scandal could be.

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Well, for one thing, Salt Lake was a lot more recent, which is a strike in itself. Add to that a reasonably fresh memory of the scandal and they aren't likely to be competitive.

1976 may well prove an insurmountable obstacle for Denver, I don't know. At least the offense is older, though. Those individuals in Denver and in the IOC who lived through it will probably not even be alive by 2026.

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That may be so, but I still maintain that Salt Lake's main weakness is their recent hosting than the scandal. People argue that it's still too early for Los Angeles again, 18 years before Salt Lake. So Salt Lake is definitely too soon for another run.

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That may be so, but I still maintain that Salt Lake's main weakness is their recent hosting than the scandal. People argue that it's still too early for Los Angeles again, 18 years before Salt Lake. So Salt Lake is definitely too soon for another run.

I agree with you. 2002 is the biggest problem. The scandal just seals the deal.

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I agree with Lord David on this one. The IOC felt cheated, deceived and embarrassed by SLC. That's not something you forget and simply ignore. Would SLC behave differently a second time around? Of course. Could they stage solid Games? Yes. But the IOC is all about relationships and subjective impressions. It's a tall order asking them to return to a city only 24 years later. It's an even taller order when the IOC felt betrayed and publicly humiliated by the city in question.

In other words, I think the IOC would hold a grudge and would punish the children for the sins of the fathers. At least for one cycle.

That's a fair assessment, I'm just not sure it will turn out to be the case. As much as the IOC's good name got dragged through the mud due to the SLC bid, the IOC's hands were just as dirty on that one. A bribery scandal such as this one goes both ways. And it often gets lost in the shuffle that Nagano bid probably had similar cases of bribery but never got called out on it.

No one is expecting the IOC to forget or ignore what happened. But if we're talking about relationships, it's not like they'd necessarily be dealing with the same people that ran the 2002 campaign, including those who were a part of the original bid before the scandal broke. So yea, it's certainly a potential problem, but similar to Denver, I don't think it's something where they see the name 'Salt Lake' and immediately want to run and hide from it. But I'm certainly with you and FYI that 24 years probably isn't long enough from the previous Winter Olympics (with no intervening US Olympics in between) and that yes, the bad history would probably magnify that factor.

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