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LuigiVercotti

What Will Be Vancouver 2010's Legacy?

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Over the hump now and heading through the second half of these OWGs...what do you think will be the legacy of Vancouver 2010? For the Olympics, for Canada, the city itself, winter sports, the fight against drugs in sport, TV and other media forms...whatever.

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I'll start off with a positive.

I think the full arenas and passionate and knowledgable fans have really made this Olympics worth watching. I think I've preferred watching the imperfect but passionate Vancouver Games to the perfect but more controlled Beijing Games in many respects. I hope the IOC takes this sort of intangible into account when they choose future hosts. I'd hate to see a Games in the middle of the dessert, for example, with sparkling venues but a weird atmosphere; watch the Abu Dhabi F1 Grand Prix to see what I mean. Beijing is as far down this road as I hope the IOC are willing to go.

So, reaffirming the importance of atmosphere relative to shiny venues is my legacy.

London ought to better Beijing in this respect, but it'll have to go some to better Vancouver, it really will. :)

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i think from an environmental standpoint Vancouver will revolutionize how bid cities incorporate the environmental aspect of the games. whether it be in the design of venues like the richmond oval (building warmer, water collecter) or the manner of the planning of the ski jump, sliding track to the villages to name a few. vancouver has left a mark in incorporating the environment and how it can help sustain it.

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For Vancouver I really hope the groups that protest every little minute problem have finally had their day and disapear now. I'd say for around 15 years they've protested everything under the guise of poverty action which makes everyone feel guilty, and they often turn violent or disrupt celebrations, meetings, or other events. They also had a tendancy to randomly vandalize things. All the while they are holding cameras and baiting police praying for an incedent that would make them a martyr in the public eye. It's almost been like the city has been under seige. We couldn't even have public celebrations at the 1 year point because they interupted every olympic ceremony leading up to it. It just seems since they were so unsuccessful in their attempts and everyone is out having so much fun that maybe they get that the public not only disagrees with their tactics, but makes us think negatively about their cause.

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having been to vancouver thrice and simply based on what i'm hearing here in the forum as well i do hope that lessens the amount of apathy amongst the locals. as evidenced by what we've seen so far it showed that vancouverites can be involved in more ways than one and have showed that they're hospitable and welcoming. i hope the next time such huge oppourtunity occurs for vancouver, more and more people will be involved whether it be a little way or big way. that's what i hope one of the legacy these games leaves the city. lessen public apathy.

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London ought to better Beijing in this respect, but it'll have to go some to better Vancouver, it really will. :)

I think Brits are as enthusiastic about most the the summer games sports as the Canadians are with the winter sports.

But i do agree, great atmosphere in the venues.

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True, I was talking about the city as a whole in some respects though. I've no doubt the venues will be full and noisy in London. I think to get a huge sprawling world city like London to have as intense and "Olympic" an atmosphere as the pictures I've seen from Vancouver will be a massive challenge.

Vancouver seems to have raised the bar in this respect. I would hope that what the IOC have seen in Vancouver will, for example, give a boost to possible future host cities like Berlin whose World Athletics Championships was similarly festive and, equally, give cities which put too heavy an emphasis on architectural splendor something to really think about.

I think the Olympics has regained some of its soul after Vancouver 2010. I think that's as big a compliment as I can give.

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True, I was talking about the city as a whole in some respects though. I've no doubt the venues will be full and noisy in London. I think to get a huge sprawling world city like London to have as intense and "Olympic" an atmosphere as the pictures I've seen from Vancouver will be a massive challenge.

Vancouver seems to have raised the bar in this respect. I would hope that what the IOC have seen in Vancouver will, for example, give a boost to possible future host cities like Berlin whose World Athletics Championships was similarly festive and, equally, give cities which put too heavy an emphasis on architectural splendor something to really think about.

I think the Olympics has regained some of its soul after Vancouver 2010. I think that's as big a compliment as I can give.

Would you say that is a direct reflection on the Olympics having 'lost their soul' in Beijing and perhaps Torino as well?

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Would you say that is a direct reflection on the Olympics having 'lost their soul' in Beijing and perhaps Torino as well?

I don't see it as a reflection of the games, but just of the hosts.

Beijing, I guess went as many expected - beautifully and flawlessly organised, but lacking in obvious spirit and spontaneity. Couldn't one also say that the Games had also loist their soul in Berlin? Moscow?

Torino surprised me. Maybe I had higher expectations of Italian passion, but those sparks never semed to catch light. Still a bit of a mystery to me.

To me, if you look at sould as crowd support and joy and passion, is probably the best since Sydney though maybe just not quite up there with that of Lillehammer. But what they've shown is it that the Games in the hands of a supportive host audience are still capable of being joyful and passionate even in a day of high security and more an more sports marketing professionalism. I think that's a pretty good legacy in itself.

I've got high expectations and hopes of the British passion and crowds in two years time Rob. OI think the ingredients are there.

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In terms of design - Vancouver, just like every Games now, marks a continuation in the integration of the host's branding into the Olympic environment. Case in point, Vancouver's Look of the Games has been applied all the way down to decorating ethernet switches at the MPC and tissue boxes at the Figure Skating venue. You didn't see this 10 years ago.

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In terms of design - Vancouver, just like every Games now, marks a continuation in the integration of the host's branding into the Olympic environment. Case in point, Vancouver's Look of the Games has been applied all the way down to decorating ethernet switches at the MPC and tissue boxes at the Figure Skating venue. You didn't see this 10 years ago.

Agree. Design's where Vancouver's been A++ to me and set the high standard now.

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Having been to as exciting a game as China vs. Finland I think one of the biggest things the IOC needs to be aware of is worldwide popular appeal. Vancouver and Canada are popular tourist destinations and the willingness of people to travel to the games needs to be considered. Lillehammer was so successful because of the tens of thousands of Swedes that crossed the boarder. The international guest help the atmosphere because they creating routing interests in the events. Vancouver has had a large influx of our American neighbours, as well as Dutch, German, and French. This has helped the crowds be more exciting and passionate.

I do think you will have this in London, I think and hope Coe has taken the knowledge that accessible tickets and creating a positive public perception before the games. Sochi is going to be like Beijing, a host so intent on results and perfection and face that the games will have no soul. Not to mention the ridiculous requirements to get into Russia. I think the atmosphere in Rio will be amazing. It certainly was for 2007 and it made up for the less than stellar organization. Just like Vancouver's is making up for the inconveniences and incidents.

Overall I think that this should tell the COC that money means nothing if you are allowing top coaches to get pouched by other countries. You look at the teams will outstanding results (luge and cross-country) we are the ones pouching the experienced and respected coaches. While for speed skating and freestyle we have been losing top coaches.

Hopefully this is a wake-up call to make sure we protect our rowing, wrestling and swimming programs better now, we are already screwed in athletics.

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Having been to as exciting a game as China vs. Finland I think one of the biggest things the IOC needs to be aware of is worldwide popular appeal. Vancouver and Canada are popular tourist destinations and the willingness of people to travel to the games needs to be considered. Lillehammer was so successful because of the tens of thousands of Swedes that crossed the boarder. The international guest help the atmosphere because they creating routing interests in the events. Vancouver has had a large influx of our American neighbours, as well as Dutch, German, and French. This has helped the crowds be more exciting and passionate.

I do think you will have this in London, I think and hope Coe has taken the knowledge that accessible tickets and creating a positive public perception before the games. Sochi is going to be like Beijing, a host so intent on results and perfection and face that the games will have no soul. Not to mention the ridiculous requirements to get into Russia. I think the atmosphere in Rio will be amazing. It certainly was for 2007 and it made up for the less than stellar organization. Just like Vancouver's is making up for the inconveniences and incidents.

Overall I think that this should tell the COC that money means nothing if you are allowing top coaches to get pouched by other countries. You look at the teams will outstanding results (luge and cross-country) we are the ones pouching the experienced and respected coaches. While for speed skating and freestyle we have been losing top coaches.

Hopefully this is a wake-up call to make sure we protect our rowing, wrestling and swimming programs better now, we are already screwed in athletics.

This seems as good a place as any to put this piece by Seb Coe in today's London Evening Standard:

London must learn the Olympics lessons of Vancouver

The Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic Games are drawing to a close and with them the last opportunity for London 2012 to learn first hand from an Olympic Games.

And we have the Paralympic Games to learn from next month, too. Because it will be our turn in just 882 days' time.

Staging an Olympic Games is the equivalent of 26 World Championships, involving more than 200 countries, over 16 days, with a two-week break before we do it all over again for the Paralympic Games.

We know you can never have too much knowledge, too many learning opportunities or do too much planning. Watching a Games take place — and for some of my team actually working in the Vancouver team — is the best possible opportunity to do this.

Our team at London 2012 learned a huge amount about sport and the “field of play” in Beijing in 2008. This time, in Vancouver, we have focused on Games time operations, on how the city functions during the Games, and how the enormous logistical challenges are delivered.

But before I get into the detailed learnings, let's be clear on one thing — the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic Games were a stunning success on many fronts.

Firstly, the sport. We saw once again that there is nothing like brilliant sporting moments to inspire. Who can forget Lindsey Vonn hurling herself down the mountain to win the women's downhill, or the bravery of Anja Persson winning bronze in the combined event just 24 hours after a terrifying fall. We saw Shaun White, the snowboarding genius, John Montgomery in the skeleton bob — all shape our memories of Vancouver. And then, of course, there was amazing Amy Williams, delivering our gold medal moment, with what felt like half the country staying up to watch her brave and skilful victory.

Secondly, the stadiums in Vancouver and courses in Whistler were packed. And they were full of the right people — real sports fans with knowledge of their sport, and fans who were not just passionate supporters of the home team but generously supported every competitor, whether Canadian or not.

This is what we want for London 2012 — stadiums packed to the rafters with people of all ages who simply love sport.

Thirdly, Vancouver showed us how a Games can bring a city to life. At times it felt as if the whole of Canada was joining in, with streets full of excited fans singing and cheering. Canadians clearly loved being part of the Games and took every opportunity to show the world how much they meant. As a Londoner, I know we will do the same in 2012, and we are determined to excite and inspire Londoners so they feel part of everything we do.

The Live Sites — the big screens in prominent places in Vancouver — were a great way of bringing people together to celebrate. Some of the best parties downtown were at the Live Sites where thousands turned out to watch the action unfolding on-screen and join in the fun at these little “theatres”, created by sponsors. The atmosphere at these sites when Canadians won medals was incredible. One of our major learnings is how important these big screens are, and what an important role they can play in capturing the imagination of Londoners outside the venues.

Volunteers play a massive role in delivering the Games — and later this year we will launch our own campaign to recruit 70,000 brilliant volunteers for London 2012. The Vancouver volunteers were another great success story — and my team learned a huge amount about the role smart volunteers can play, about the standard of customer service required, and about the amount of training our volunteers will need.

From the moment I and my team of around 50 from the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games landed, we were welcomed and guided by some incredible people who had signed up simply to be part of the Games. We know Londoners will rise to the challenge in 2012, and we have gained some excellent insight into how we recruit and train what will be our frontline ambassadors for our Games.

We will fly home this weekend and start our internal debrief first thing next week. We will share information on sport, transport, accommodation, the athletes' village, venue operations, communications, marketing, technology, ceremonies and city operations. We'll discuss the innovative Vancouver Cultural Olympiad and the programme the Vancouver organisers delivered to engage the city and the nation.

Although the Games got off to a difficult start, with the tragic death of Nodar Kumaritashvili, they will leave enduring memories of how athletes, organisers and the people of Vancouver went beyond their personal best to deliver to the rest of us experiences of a lifetime.

The 2010 Winter Paralympic Games begin on 12 March. I will be back in Vancouver and will have a team on the ground watching them, learning and soaking up every last piece of knowledge. I know, from our experience at the Olympic Games, that the Paralympic Games will be a great success, and we look forward to returning from Vancouver at the end of March excited and inspired that London is now the next Olympic and Paralympic City.

In the coming months, our job is to inspire Londoners and the whole country to sign up and get involved in London 2012. Having seen Vancouver, I know London can do it.

Sebastian Coe is chair of the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games.

http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/standard/article-23810224-london-must-learn-the-olympics-lessons-of-vancouver.do

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is this the first olympics were no athlete(s) were expelled for drug use? if so, what an achievement.

is this the first olympics were no athlete(s) were expelled for drug use? if so, what an achievement.

is this the first olympics were no athlete(s) were expelled for drug use? if so, what an achievement.

is this the first olympics were no athlete(s) were expelled for drug use? if so, what an achievement.

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Unless you count the 30 who weren't allowed to come before the Games started.

A good pre-emptive move.

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is this the first olympics were no athlete(s) were expelled for drug use? if so, what an achievement.

is this the first olympics were no athlete(s) were expelled for drug use? if so, what an achievement.

is this the first olympics were no athlete(s) were expelled for drug use? if so, what an achievement.

is this the first olympics were no athlete(s) were expelled for drug use? if so, what an achievement.

ooops. didn't mean to repeat that.

Unless you count the 30 who weren't allowed to come before the Games started.

A good pre-emptive move.

i mean during games time?

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Giant inflatable beavers

Whatever turns you on mate.

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Vancouver 2010 Debrief To Begin Next Week

The official debriefing of the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games will get underway next week in the future Olympic winter host city of Sochi. The main part of the debriefing will run from 7 to 10 June. Organised by the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the debrief will see the staff of the Vancouver 2010 Organising Committee (VANOC) sharing their knowledge and experience with representatives from London 2012, Sochi 2014, Rio 2016 and the three applicant cities for the Games in 2018. This, its sixth edition, will continue the IOC’s commitment to ensuring that future Games organisers are able to benefit from the experience and lessons of past organisers by providing a forum for the exchange of Games-related knowledge.

...

The debrief will be split into three different parts. The first part, of three days from 3 to 5 June, will focus exclusively on the technological aspects of the Games in Vancouver. The second part, from 7 to 10 June, will look at all other aspects of the Games organisation and will include a combination of plenary sessions, functional area workshops and sessions that look at the needs of the different Games stakeholders. The final element of the debrief will be a special extension to the programme on 11 June, specifically for workshops devoted to the Paralympic Games.

http://www.olympic.org/en/content/Media/?articleId=90986&articleNewsGroup=-1

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Vancouver 2010 makes final presentation to the IOC Session

©IOC/Richard Juilliart

It has been almost 500 days since the Olympic flame was extinguished in Vancouver, thus bringing an end to an unforgettable XXI Olympic Winter Games. Today in Durban, Vancouver Organising Committee Chairman John Furlong and IOC Coordination Commission Chairman René Fasel closed another chapter of the Games by delivering the final presentation for Vancouver 2010 to the 123rd IOC Session.

Lasting legacies

By all measures, the Vancouver Games were a great success. The local Organising Committee set out to “touch the soul of the nation and inspire the world by creating and delivering an extraordinary Olympic and Paralympic experience with lasting legacies,” Furlong told the Session. Mission accomplished: The Games united Canada from coast to coast, brought greater global awareness and respect for Canada’s aboriginal community, and left many lasting sports, social, human and infrastructure legacies.

One of the greatest legacies from the Games was a renewed interest in volunteerism thanks to the 50,000 “blue jackets”, who donated their time and effort to help make the Games a remarkable experience for everyone involved.

The Games also brought much in the way of infrastructure to Vancouver. From the Canada Line metro to the Sea to Sky highway, and from the Convention Centre to renovations at the airport, the area continues to benefit from the work undertaken to stage the Games.

Canada’s Own the Podium programme was a clear success, resulting in the most gold medals (14) ever won by a single country at an Olympic Winter Games. This not only inspired a new generation of athletes in Canada, but also led to an increase in funding for sport in the country.

Waste-free and carbon-neutral, Vancouver 2010 set a new standard for environmental sustainability, while Legacies Now (renamed LIFT) created a great number of social legacies, including affordable housing and an acceleration in the growth of not-for-profit organisations.

A great catalyst

“Rarely in my many years within the Olympic Movement, have I ever seen such passion, such energy, such willingness to come together around such a unifying project as the Games,” said Fasel. “Canadians joined forces to welcome the world and show the best that Canada could offer. I am sincerely convinced that this renewed pride and confidence that Canadians have in themselves is undoubtedly one of the greatest legacies that the Games have left to Vancouver, British Columbia and the whole of Canada.

“The Olympic Games have once again shown their tremendous catalysing effect and their potential to produce long-lasting change when they support a clear vision that is shared by all the partners involved in their organisation.”

IOC

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Bravo Vancouver. I can't even pinpoint the greatest benefit or legacy, there's just too many to choose from.

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“Canadians joined forces to welcome the world and show the best that Canada could offer.

And then of course, completely unraveled it last month after the defeat in the Stanley Cup. :P

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Another lasting legacy is all those 2010 plush mascot toys they have left at Northern Gifts in Burnaby they are trying to get rid of. :P

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