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Is Toronto going to have a referendum on the Olympics?

Too early to know. I would say that's the right course of action, and now would be the best time to do it because of the high of the Pan Ams. I don't think they had one in 1996 or 2008.

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Bore off.

Well, if Toronto had entered, and you were going to make a list of the minus frtactors for the bids, you cpould say: Madrid - Spain's economy is in really bad shape Japan - Although Pyeongchang shou

MisterSG1 is simply ignorant of the fact that his "Canada" was created by immigrants themselves, much like my "Australia" is. We should be grateful for the immigrant populations from all corners of th

Too early to know. I would say that's the right course of action, and now would be the best time to do it because of the high of the Pan Ams. I don't think they had one in 1996 or 2008.

Yeah we won't know until a bid is submitted. There has been no mention of a referendum up to now.

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Don’t abandon Toronto’s Olympic dream: Editorial Toronto’s chances of hosting the summer Olympics have never been better — if we still dream of Olympic glory the time to act is now.
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Kevin Frayer / CP

Commuter train adorned with slogan for Toronto's bid for the 2008 Olympics at Union Station in Toronto in 2001.

Published on Tue Jul 28 2015

Toronto has seven weeks to answer a simple question: Do we still want it?

This city boldly sought the 1996 Summer Olympics, when Atlanta won the right to host, and then the 2008 Games that went to Beijing. Now it has until Sept. 15 to decide whether it should bid for the 2024 event – officially the Games of the XXXIII Olympiad.

Do we still care? Do we still aspire to be an Olympic city?

There’s compelling evidence that the answer is “yes,” including the results of a Forum Research poll carried out on Sunday. And if that’s the case, it’s vital that Toronto join the race for the 2024 Olympics and submit a letter of interest before the deadline. The ideal way forward would be to convene a special meeting of city council on this issue, shortly after Labour Day, and press for a strong vote of support.

Details such as the extent of necessary new construction, anticipated costs, who pays, and who gets stuck with any overruns, can all be worked out later. A comprehensive cost-benefit analysis still lies ahead. And Toronto will have plenty of time to withdraw if hosting proves too great a burden.

That’s for the future. Right now, the city has a few short weeks to decide if it’s in or out of the contest. And Toronto’s odds of finishing first have never been better.

Its chances received a big boost on Monday when Boston’s bid flamed out. Officials in Beantown announced they were in no position to cover any cost overruns. That leaves Paris, Rome, Budapest and Hamburg still in the running.

But a strong case can be made that it’s North America’s turn to host. The Summer Olympics haven’t been held on this continent since Atlanta in 1996; by 2024 they will have been absent for almost three decades. That puts a potential Toronto bid in a highly favourable light.

So does the city’s extraordinary success in hosting the 2015 Pan American Games. Toronto showed the world how effectively it can run a huge, international, multi-sport competition. Delivered on time and on budget, to enthusiastic crowds cheering outstanding athletic performances, the Pan Am Games were a revelation. And members of the International Olympic Committee took notice.

Hosting the 2024 Summer Games would serve Toronto well by revitalizing its empty Port Lands, boosting the local economy, and highlighting to the world all that this amazing city has to offer. But Toronto would be good for the Olympics, too.

Recent changes in IOC policy have put new emphasis on promoting diversity and resisting discrimination, including on grounds of sexual orientation. Toronto’s international reputation as a remarkably tolerant and welcoming place — one of the most multicultural on the planet — would serve that commitment well.

And the 2024 Olympics could be run on a more practical budget than some past games. The IOC recently declared itself open to more affordable bids after the soaring cost of playing host noticeably discouraged some worthwhile cities. The race for the 2022 Winter Olympics, for example, has dwindled to just two candidates: Beijing and Almaty, in Kazakhstan. The winner is to be announced on Friday.

It’s understandable that Mayor John Tory (open John Tory's policard) wants to avoid being “stampeded” into a bid. But the calendar’s inexorable reality demands a decision soon. And it would be a shame to abandon Toronto’s Olympic dream just as it comes within reach.

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^The writer of that article clearly does not know what he's talking about. It's all fine and dandy for him to write that stuff because he makes decent points, but on a site like this where we know more than that author will ever know about Olympic bidding, it won't hold water. Anyone who has knowledge on the subject knows that Europe is the front runner and Torontos best chances are in 2028 or 2032.

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^The writer of that article clearly does not know what he's talking about. It's all fine and dandy for him to write that stuff because he makes decent points, but on a site like this where we know more than that author will ever know about Olympic bidding, it won't hold water. Anyone who has knowledge on the subject knows that Europe is the front runner and Torontos best chances are in 2028 or 2032.

A lot of articles are stating that as well. There seems to be a fail of mentioning Europe's support.

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After Beijing won the 2022 Winter Games, I'd say "Agenda 2020" is a joke and Toronto shouldn't waste its time or money with a 2024 bid.

I don't get that argument at all. Would Almaty have fit in that much better under the Agenda 2020 umbrella? I don't think so. 2024 will be the first real test of the new reforms. 2022 became the clusterfuck that it was before Agenda 2020 and they were left with 2 unappealing options. Either way, I think we need to see how history plays out before we truly know what Agenda 2020 has done for the Olympic movement. It is way too early to pass judgment on it based on 1 vote, the lead-up for which pre-dated the reforms.

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After Beijing won the 2022 Winter Games, I'd say "Agenda 2020" is a joke and Toronto shouldn't waste its time or money with a 2024 bid.

Agenda 2020's implementation won't be Toronto's problem. Toronto's problem begins with a P and ends in an s. And it's not what you do in the sink when you're a drunk student.

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After Beijing won the 2022 Winter Games, I'd say "Agenda 2020" is a joke and Toronto shouldn't waste its time or money with a 2024 bid.

Agenda 2020 was approved AFTER the mess of 2022 WOG race, when not desirable cities dropped the race and leave us these two undesirable contenders (Or really Almaty was great? To beat Oslo, Munich and others?). 2024 race will be the real proof.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Tory meets with Olympic committee boss about possible bid

23

By Don Peat, City Hall Bureau Chief

First posted:

Tuesday, August 11, 2015 07:09 PM EDT

TORONTO - Mayor John Tory met with the head of the Canadian Olympic Committee Tuesday for a briefing on the 2024 bid process, the Sun has learned.

Tory met privately at City Hall with COC president Marcel Aubut and Bob Richardson, the chief operating officer of Toronto’s 2008 Olympic bid. But Tory’s office says he still hasn’t made up his mind on whether Toronto should bid to host the 2024 Summer Olympics.

Last month, Aubut publicly vowed to push for a Toronto Olympic bid and said he was “confident” Tory would be able to get councillors on side.

As the clock ticks toward the Sept. 15 deadline for cities to express an interest to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in bidding on the 2024 games, Tory’s office confirmed the mayor is still doing his homework.

“The mayor was getting briefed on the changes to the bid process recently announced by the IOC as well as background on previous bid processes,” Tory’s spokesman Amanda Galbraith said Tuesday. “This is part of the consultation and due diligence the mayor committed to undertake.”

Galbraith stressed Tory has not made a decision on whether or not Toronto should bid on the Olympics for the third time.

“Toronto is in the midst of hosting the Parapan Am Games — part of the largest sporting event in Canadian history — he is focused on their success,” she said. “Any further discussion about a possible Olympic bid would take place after the close of these games.”

Richardson — who served as co-chair of Tory’s successful 2014 mayoral election campaign — described the meeting as a straightforward, informational meeting about how the bid process works now and how it worked during the 2008 bid.

Despite his involvement in the failed 2008 Olympic bid, Richardson said he hasn’t decided yet whether he’ll be involved in a possible 2024 bid.

“If it make sense to (bid), I would obviously be supportive, but there is still a lot of homework to do before you come up with making those sort of decisions,” he said.

COC spokesman Carl Vallee said Aubut is making good on his pledge to “use the full power of his office to lead and advocate Toronto’s candidacy to host the 2024 Olympic Games.”

“Toronto could truly benefit from this new era for bidding and hosting the Olympic Games,” Vallee said.

“The new IOC model under Olympic Agenda 2020 encourages — in a financially sustainable way — the use of existing facilities in communities surrounding the host city.”

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"It’s believed Tory is poised to sign off on putting Toronto’s name in the ring, following a successful Pan Am Games and with new relaxed rules handed down by the International Olympic Committee."

http://www.thestar.com/news/city_hall/2015/08/12/john-tory-meets-with-olympic-committee-as-toronto-weighs-bid-for-2024-games.html

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Ok, intoronto, look at the real world, read those comments from that Toronto Star article you posted, and just tell me how many are in favor of a bid. I read every comment and could not find one supporting the idea.

Yet for being the realist, I am somehow seen as being the troll here.

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Comments on online newspaper articles are generally not the best place to look for positive feedback on anything. Think about social media, a post could have well over 10000 likes or shares, but 35 comments, all negative.

My general rule online (outside of forums), is avoid reading comments.

I say this with complete indifference to Toronto's bid or the people here who support it.

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Comments on online newspaper articles are generally not the best place to look for positive feedback on anything. Think about social media, a post could have well over 10000 likes or shares, but 35 comments, all negative.

My general rule online (outside of forums), is avoid reading comments.

Yup. It's funny every time I read an article that's posted on MSN, a predominately "liberal/progressive" site, the comments are full of inbred redneck tea baggers. The same goes for ABC's page on facebook.

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Anger from our friends in Beantown killed their bid. I spoke to a PhD student outside the Markham venue on Sunday about the Olympic bid. She was doing a survey about the ParaPan Am games, we had a fairly long conversation but she agreed with me and knew her stuff in that going for Toronto 2024 would be a total waste.

Why is it that governments are willing to pour billions into the five ring circus, but not willing to pour billions to build real rapid transit in Toronto. If you recall the long debates in previous years, we couldn't afford subway lines, we could only afford LRT, blah blah blah. I've been saying it since I first came on to this site, TORONTO NEEDS TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE. And by that I mean everything, rapid transit and freeways, yes evil freeways which city dwellers hate so much.

Hosting the olympics would be nice, but they'd have to do a lot more than Agenda 2020 to make it feasible and desirable for everyone involved. Many articles you will find about the Olympics being the poison pill. I tend to agree with them, for your information, I am not anti-Olympics, I went to many events during the Pan American Games:

Rugby Sevens, Artistic Roller Skating, Squash, Handball, Swimming, Modern Pentathlon, Athletics, and Racquetball

For the Parapan American games I have went to:

Table Tennis, Swimming, Athletics and have the final for wheelchair basketball.

But what I do want to see with the Olympics is control, and at this point I still do not trust the incredibly corrupt IOC one bit.

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The fact you think that Toronto Star comments are indicative of the opinions of Torontonians indicates once again that you have no clue. Most of those comments are from those aged 60+ living in other parts of the province and the outer, outer suburbs. There are numerous reasons why people there would not want anything to be invested in Toronto, we won't go over the reasons yet again, it's pretty obvious as this dynamic exists with most major cities and their hinterlands filled with bitter redneck geriatrics.

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So MisterCorporate, are you willing to just throw 20 billion dollars of our tax money away for a three week party? Mind you that's a very conservative estimate on the price of an Olympics. You obviously know where I reside, am I in the "outer outer suburbs" as you describe, because I consider myself as living in the GTA. The municipal borders of Toronto may end at Steeles Avenue at the north, and the Etobicoke Creek at the west, but you and I both know that the city does not magically end at these legislated boundaries. What goes on in Peel and York is for sure important to how the GTA functions as a whole.

Not just Torontonians have a say on this issue, even with events that will of course happen in other municipalities in southern Ontario, you have to remember that there will be a lot of tax money that will be spent by both Queen's Park and Ottawa on the Olympics. So yes, these redneck geriatrics that you seem to hate so much have an equal say as you do presumably in your glass box in the sky, as there money, just like yours will be spent on this boondoggle.

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The mayor had a press conference today to talk about some issues which includes the Olympic bid. He says he hasn't made up his mind yet and we shouldn't believe the press that are saying he's ready with a pen in his hand to sign off on the letter right now. He will be meeting with several other people and organizations in the coming weeks to gather all the information he needs about this bid. He also said the Pan Am committee will be releasing information in the beginning of September. He says he has supported Toronto's past bids for '96 and '08.

We probably won't get an answer until close to the deadline. He obviously wants to demonstrate to the public he is going to utilize all the time he has to analyze info and get in as much meetings as he can. I still feel Toronto will definitely be bidding.

Video: http://www.cp24.com/video#678801

Start it from 19:24

Edited by dave199
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So MisterCorporate, are you willing to just throw 20 billion dollars of our tax money away for a three week party? Mind you that's a very conservative estimate on the price of an Olympics. You obviously know where I reside, am I in the "outer outer suburbs" as you describe, because I consider myself as living in the GTA. The municipal borders of Toronto may end at Steeles Avenue at the north, and the Etobicoke Creek at the west, but you and I both know that the city does not magically end at these legislated boundaries. What goes on in Peel and York is for sure important to how the GTA functions as a whole.

Not just Torontonians have a say on this issue, even with events that will of course happen in other municipalities in southern Ontario, you have to remember that there will be a lot of tax money that will be spent by both Queen's Park and Ottawa on the Olympics. So yes, these redneck geriatrics that you seem to hate so much have an equal say as you do presumably in your glass box in the sky, as there money, just like yours will be spent on this boondoggle.

No one needs the Olympics. Its the want aspect. The Olympics come with a deadline something we need to get rapid transit built in this city.

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