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A world cup is a multi city hosting versus one city hosting. I doubt that they have the resources to concentrate on working on simultaneous bids and winning both and preparing for both in a time period that will overlap each other. It's way too much for a nation, especially an African nation at that.

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Bore off.

Well, if Toronto had entered, and you were going to make a list of the minus frtactors for the bids, you cpould say: Madrid - Spain's economy is in really bad shape Japan - Although Pyeongchang shou

MisterSG1 is simply ignorant of the fact that his "Canada" was created by immigrants themselves, much like my "Australia" is. We should be grateful for the immigrant populations from all corners of th

/\/\ Well, then RSA or Durban may skip CWG 2022. I just think it would result in a more seasoned staging of an OG.

It would, but the bid timeline hurts them. Because the deadline to accept candidates for the 2024 Olympics occurs before the vote for the 2022 CWG, part of South Africa's play for the Olympics would obviously be based on the CWG. But at that point, they won't know if they have them yet. So what happens if they enter an Olympics race and then don't land the Commonwealth Games. Then you're letting the air out of the balloon and suddenly 1 of your potential selling points for 2024 is out the window.

I agree that the CWG could be a good exercise in preparation for an Olympics just like it was for Rio. But it worked for them with the events 9 years apart. I understand the logic about re-using things such as an athlete's village and the like. A 2 year separation just seems too short for 2 multi-sport events in the same city.

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It would, but the bid timeline hurts them. Because the deadline to accept candidates for the 2024 Olympics occurs before the vote for the 2022 CWG, part of South Africa's play for the Olympics would obviously be based on the CWG. But at that point, they won't know if they have them yet. So what happens if they enter an Olympics race and then don't land the Commonwealth Games. Then you're letting the air out of the balloon and suddenly 1 of your potential selling points for 2024 is out the window.

I agree that the CWG could be a good exercise in preparation for an Olympics just like it was for Rio. But it worked for them with the events 9 years apart. I understand the logic about re-using things such as an athlete's village and the like. A 2 year separation just seems too short for 2 multi-sport events in the same city.

Rio hosted Pan Ams.

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Really? You guys feel that neglected as a country & don't account 1988 & 2010 for meaning anything? Don't think the IOC would view that the same way.

No, I meant the city of Toronto. We haven't had a championship major professional sports team since 1993, except for in the CFL, and the losses in 2008 and 1996 were devestating. Point is, Toronto hasn't had a lot going for it athletically recently. Toronto 2015 will be a huge event for the city to possibly change this.

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No, I meant the city of Toronto. We haven't had a championship major professional sports team since 1993, except for in the CFL, and the losses in 2008 and 1996 were devestating. Point is, Toronto hasn't had a lot going for it athletically recently. Toronto 2015 will be a huge event for the city to possibly change this.

lol complete misunderstanding.

The Leafs who havent won a cup since 67 came back to force a game 7 last night, were winning 4-1 with 9mins left and lost. This is why people jokingly suggested we need the Games cuz the Leafs lost.

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lol complete misunderstanding.

The Leafs who havent won a cup since 67 came back to force a game 7 last night, were winning 4-1 with 9mins left and lost. This is why people jokingly suggested we need the Games cuz the Leafs lost.

It's very hard to be a Toronto sports fan lol

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For Toronto's sake, I hope you're not in anyway a voice of the bid. The above sentiment is pure bid killer.

It came out wrong but in some small small ways its true. Africa as a continent and south Africa alone should spend money elsewhere instead of an Olympic games just like India should've instead of the 2010 commonwealth games. The country still has numerous issues to be fixed and Olympics shouldn't be a priority. They'd win because Africa is the last frontier but not always the most suited host like Rio.
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For Toronto's sake, I hope you're not in anyway a voice of the bid. The above sentiment is pure bid killer.

It's true. Obviously I wouldn't be the voice of the bid..lol I'm not being politically correct on these boards cause I have no need to.

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Question to the other Toronto members. What's your ethnic background? Were you born in Toronto? I was born in Toronto with a 100% Italian background as both parents immigrated here from Italy back in the 1950's.

We can surely bet that Toronto will be using the "We're the most multi-cultural city in the World" line.

Info on Toronto's multicultural demographics:

The demographics of Toronto make Toronto one of the most multicultural cities in the world.

A majority of Torontonians claim their ethnic origin[3] as, either in whole or in part, from England (12.9%), China (12.0%), Canada (11.3%), Ireland (9.7%), Scotland (9.5%), India (7.6%), Italy (6.9%), the Philippines (5.5%), Germany (4.6%), France (4.5%), Poland (3.8%), Portugal (3.6%), and Jamaica (3.2%), or are of Jewish ethnic origin (3.1%). There is also a significant population of Ukrainians (2.5%), Russians (2.4%), Sri Lankans (2.3%), Spanish (2.2%), Greeks (2.2%), people from the British Isles in general (2.0%), Koreans (1.5%), Dutch (1.5%), Iranians (1.4%), Vietnamese (1.4%), Pakistanis (1.2%), Hungarians (1.2%), Guyanese (1.1%), and Welsh (1.0%). Communities of Afghans, Arabs, Barbadians, Bengalis, Bulgarians, Colombians, Croats, Ecuadorians, Grenadians, Mexicans, Romanians, Salvadorans, Serbs, Somalis, Tibetans, Trinidadians, and Vincentians are also to be found throughout the city. Neighbourhoods such as Chinatown, Corso Italia, Little India, Greektown, Koreatown, Little Jamaica, Little Portugal and Roncesvalles are examples of these large ethno-cultural populations

While English is the predominant language spoken by Torontonians, Statistics Canada reports that other language groups are significant (in order), including the Chinese languages (particularly Cantonese and Mandarin), Italian, Punjabi, Spanish, Tagalog, Urdu, Tamil, Portuguese, Persian, Arabic, Russian, Polish, Gujarati, Korean, Vietnamese, and Greek.

Toronto is the world's most multicultural city. In 2004, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) ranked Toronto second, behind Miami, Florida, in its list of the world's cities with the largest percentage of foreign-born population. Miami's foreign-born population is dominated by those of Cuban and Latin American descent, unlike Toronto's foreign-born population, which is not dominated by any particular ethnic group.

The 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) indicates that 49.1% of Toronto's population is composed of visible minorities; 1,264,395 non-Whites, or 20.2% of Canada's visible minority population, live in the City of Toronto; of this, approximately 70% are of Asian ancestry.

Top 20 Ethnic Origins Populations in Toronto (CMA 2011)

1.English 777,110 14.1%

2.Canadian 728,745 13.2%

3.Chinese 594,735 10.8%

4.East Indian 572,250 10.4%

5.Scottish 545,365 9.9%

6.Irish 543,600 9.8%

7.Italian 475,090 8.6%

8.German 262,830 4.8%

9.French 249,375 4.5%

10.Filipino 246,345 4.5%

11.Polish 214.455 3.9%

12.Portuguese 196,975 3.6%

13.Jamaican 177,305 3.2%

14.Jewish 137,165 2.5%

15.Ukrainian 130,350 2.4%

16.Russian 118,090 2.1%

17.Spanish 105,740 1.9%

18.Sri Lankan 104,980 1.9%

19.British Isles 104,070 1.9%

20.Dutch 98,925 1.8%

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I'm ethnically Chinese but was born in Taiwan so I consider my original nationality Taiwanese or Republic of China, and my family immigrated to Toronto when I was 9.

I think Toronto really need to think of a way to play up the multiculturalism and tie it into why this is important to the IOC.

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I'm a first generation Canadian on my mom's side and was born in Toronto but not raised there. Everyone else in her family was born in either Hungary or the US. Other than that I'm mostly Irish.

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