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Boxing Kangaroo under attack from IOC

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has ordered the Australian Olympic Committee take down the flag because it was too commercial as it is a registered trademark.

The display of national pride at the Olympics by competing athletes is a tradition, the Australian team says, so it will defy an order to take down a boxing kangaroo flag at the Vancouver Olympic Winter Games.

The giant green and gold flag, which shows a red-gloved golden kangaroo, has been draped over a balcony in the athletes' village.

Mike Tancred from the Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) said it was something Australian Olympic teams did at every Games.

"We put up a flag on the front of the accommodation section of the village where our athletes will be living," Mr Tancred told ABC Radio.

"We all do it, we do it at every games.

"But someone from the IOC has told us the boxing kangaroo is too commercial because it's a registered trademark."

The flag is a registered trademark because it is used by the AOC to promote sport and fair play in schools.

The rights to the image were bought from Alan Bond, who licensed it after flying it from his America's Cup-winning yacht in 1983.

Australians are defying the IOC order and are keeping the flag flying.

NineMSN

:angry:<_<

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I think this is VANOC's work if this has always been done at other Olympics. About two weeks ago, VANOC made a huge fit when Scotiabank (a non-sponsor) unveiled a "Show Your Colours" campaign:

Scotiabank's "Show Your Colours" is a marketing campaign that is designed around a contest. Through their website, which is still up at the time this article was written, Canadians can submit photographs that show their spirit for Canada.

A winner is to be selected from entries each day till April 4, 2010 and will win a Flip MinoHD camcorder. The winner of the online voting "People's Choice" photograph is also suppose to win a Flip MinoHD camcorder.

"Show Your Colours is about enjoying and celebrating what our great country has to offer," stated John Doig, Senior Vice-President Marketing for Scotiabank in a company statement released on Wednesday. "This is a fun and meaningful way to engage the nation in our true north spirit and pride."

So what is wrong with Scotiabank wanting to encourage Canadians to show their pride? According to VANOC it is the misleading impression that the marketing campaign is connected to the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics that is the problem.

Scotiabank is not associated with the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics. The official bank sponsor for the Olympic Games is the Royal Bank of Canada. RBC paid $110 million to be the official bank sponsor of the Games and to use the Winter Olympics in their advertisements.

The problem with the timing of Scotiabank's "Show Your Colours" campaign is that it launched a month before the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics starts on February 12th. It is scheduled to end in April after the Paralympics Games occur March 12th -21st.

The issue with how the campaign was launched was that it was done in Vancouver with an ice hockey theme. Ice hockey of course is one of the main events at any Winter Olympics, but is expected to be even more so at the Vancouver Games.

Scotiabank launched the "Show Your Colours" campaign on Tuesday with Canadian ice hockey star, Cassie Campbell. The captain of the Canadian women's ice hockey team from 2001-2006, Campbell is a special advisor to Scotiabank for its hockey program and is the ambassador to the Scotiabank Hockey Club. Campbell is also a six-time World Champion gold medalist and won two Olympic gold medals.

At Tuesday's launch of Scotiabank's "Show Your Colours" campaign, Campbell was joined by hockey players from the North Shore Winter Club and Lyric Singers Choir that sang "O Canada!" The young hockey players wore white and red hockey jerseys.

Due to the timing and the method that the marketing campaign was launched, the VANOC feels that the public will be mislead to think that Scotiabank is a sponsor of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics or at least associated to the Games. Since this is unfair to the actual bank sponsor RBC, VANOC has asked Scotiabank to postpone the campaign until after the Olympics. VANOC is considering legal actions if necessary.

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I think it's an IOC rather than VANOC brain seizure.

Commercial Copyright my arse! The copyright belongs to the Australian Olympic Committee and everyone knows it's one of our most popular sports supporters banners. It's not even as if it shows the Olympic Rings.

If my memory serves, it originated as a fuselage decoration on one of our fighters based in Darwin or New Guinea in WWII, former millionaire/gaol inmate Alan Bond used it during the Australian Americas Cup campaign in 1983, and the AOC bought it off him in the lead-up to Sydney to use as a sporting banner/symbol.

My guess is some fuddy duddy has complained because it's too prominent at the moment. Wait till the other teams start to arrive in force and hang up their flags and banners.

Rogge can go get rogered by the Roo for all I care.

Edited by Sir Roltel
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You might be right...the IOC forced Team Canada (our ice hockey team) to ditch its corporate logo which has traditionally been on our Olympic jerseys for a new neutral logo.

before

team%20canada%20red.jpg

after

Canada2010red.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=0TTXDM86AJ1CB68A7P02&Expires=1265351644&Signature=LjyRLM50YHV0h8sdDhJvZB6J3QY%3d

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It's kind of like the whole renaming of GM Place to Canada Hockey Place, which I don't get because GM is a National Partner sponsor of the Olympics too. There's some things with the IOC that makes you go: :blink::huh:

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Bloody hell, talk about creating a fuss over nothing. Do they not have PR guys working at the IOC? They're about to put on a great show and some fuddy-duddy raises this as an "issue". Who do they reckon's going to come off as the bad guy.

I could kind of understand it when the Germans confiscated orange clothes with BAVARIA BEER written all over them as that could have harmed the real sponsors (even that was quite silly), but this is dumb. Don't back down Australia.

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Bloody hell, talk about creating a fuss over nothing. Do they not have PR guys working at the IOC? They're about to put on a great show and some fuddy-duddy raises this as an "issue". Who do they reckon's going to come off as the bad guy.

I could kind of understand it when the Germans confiscated orange clothes with BAVARIA BEER written all over them as that could have harmed the real sponsors (even that was quite silly), but this is dumb. Don't back down Australia.

Its a load of crap. THe Aussies have used the Kangaroo for a long time! This is just PC bullshit!

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It is kind of PC but I totally agree with only allowing non-privately owned symbols to be displayed on flags and such. I just wish they would crack down on the uniforms too. It's perfectly alright for a clothing company to have an obvious trademark style shown, but blazoning a giant logo bigger than the national symbols on a jacket (hint hint: on some Canada and US items) is kind of annoying when everything else is so strictly regulated.

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Gloves off over boxing kangaroo dispute

The International Olympic Committee's (IOC) move to ban the boxing kangaroo flag from the Winter Games village in Vancouver has been called scandalous, ridiculous and infantile.

The Australian team has been asked to remove the flag because it has been deemed inappropriate, but that request has drawn some angry responses.

The boxing kangaroo is still flying high over an apartment block in the Olympic Village in Vancouver - but its days might be numbered. The International Olympic Committee says the flag is too commercial.

Chef de Mission with the Australian team, Ian Chesterman, says the IOC wants it taken down.

"We thought it was appropriate but they didn't agree with that because it's a commercial trademark - and being quite strict on commercial trademarks at this games - they said to us please take it down," he said.

Mr Chesterman says the flag will only be taken down when the IOC provides a written request.

"We're hoping to keep it up there. I think the people around Vancouver are getting right behind it too," he said.

"I walk into the village and get a great sense from the police and the officials and from other competitors and coaches saying 'hey, that looks fantastic' and then you say to somebody 'I think we might have to take it down' and they say that would be a great shame."

The boxing kangaroo became Australia's sporting symbol in 1983 when it was used in the successful America's Cup.

John Longley was part of the crew.

"It was an image that we created, to be a symbol for what we stood for, which was the red gloves. It used to have a red eye and the puffed up chest and so forth. It was aggressive, we're taking the world on," he said.

The Australian Olympic Committee has since bought the trademark and now the boxing kangaroo is seen among crowds at Olympic and Commonwealth Games and other major sporting events.

'Too controlling'

Mr Longley says the IOC just doesn't get it.

"The IOC are one of the most controlling organisations on the planet and they look after their commercial interests with absolute rigid situations," he said.

"I understand them doing it, but the reason that they've done it is because they don't get it.

"Maybe if someone explained to them what the flag was, then maybe they would understand that it ... is Australia's sporting flag. That's what it's become."

Olympic gold medallist Kieran Perkins says the International Olympic Committee's request to have the roo removed is disappointing.

"I think it's one of those classic sporting tales - men in blazers who love nothing more than to wield the voluntary power they have received and athletes who think they should have the right to look after themselves the way they want to, butting heads," he said.

Perkins says for some athletes, sporting symbols like the boxing kangaroo can be a source of motivation.

"For me it was more about what you were wearing when you pull on that jumper, or you've got that pair of swimmers and the cap on, that has those symbols," he said.

"Those things to me were the real gee-up moments. Whereas what's hanging off the walls didn't tend to bother me too much.

"But that's me personally. I do know though that there are guys that really do find those sorts of symbols awe inspiring. It can be extremely beneficial."

Perkins says for the sake of the games the Australians should obey the request if the IOC does provide a written request.

"The last thing you want to do is distract the athletes from what really matters - which is their preparation and competition - with infantile arguments over a flag that's been hung outside the building," he said.

"I do think that one of the issues you always get in these sorts of scenarios is with the personalities involved.

"If it turns out that the person from the IOC who made the complaint is particularly stubborn or dogged about the issue, then it can blow up into something which becomes a distraction.

"At the end of the day that is unnecessary and only going to disadvantage our athletes."

Nobody from the IOC was available for comment.

ABC Sport

Deputy Prime Minister Julia Gillard urges Australian athletes to fly the boxing kangaroo flag

JULIA Gillard is urging Australian athletes to fly the Boxing Kangaroo flag in defiance of an Olympic ban.

The Deputy Prime Minister blasted as "ridiculous" the International Olympic Committee's demand it be removed from Vancouver's Winter Games village.

"It's a scandal and I think we want to see a lot of the Boxing Kangaroo, particularly now we've had this ridiculous ruling ... so yes, boxing kangaroos everywhere," said Ms Gillard, who proudly showed the flag.

Opposition Leader Tony Abbott also backed the flag.

"I think they've flown that Boxing Kangaroo in a spirit of exuberance and I like to see exuberant, confident, vigorous athletes," he said.

The Australian team is refusing to take down the giant flag, which has been draped from a balcony in a team tradition.

The IOC has made no public comment.

Herald Sun

Edited by Sir Roltel
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It's kind of like the whole renaming of GM Place to Canada Hockey Place, which I don't get because GM is a National Partner sponsor of the Olympics too. There's some things with the IOC that makes you go: :blink::huh:

Well any significant non-Olympic branding is not allowed at any Olympic venues, this has been the case since the IOC went ahead with the Look of the Games program for each host city. "GM Place" is considered significant and non-Olympic, even if GM is an Olympic partner or a sponsor.

But this case at the Village with the kangaroo seems totally ridiculous. The banner isn't communicating anything that the other flags aren't.

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Wow! You learn something new all the time. I didn't realise the Boxing kangaroo was partly a german creation. The kind of fact CAF likes!

The image of the boxing kangaroo has been known since 1891, in which a cartoon titled "Jack, the fighting Kangaroo with Professor Lendermann" appeared.[1] The image was inspired by a travelling boxing show which had kangaroos boxing with men. Das Boxende Känguruh, a German silent film directed by Max Skladanowsky and first presented in Berlin on November 1 1895, featured a boxing kangaroo.

Wikipedia

And also, I was searching for a Fighting Kiwi flag, and came across this:

kiwi-722840.JPG

Edited by Sir Roltel
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It's kind of like the whole renaming of GM Place to Canada Hockey Place, which I don't get because GM is a National Partner sponsor of the Olympics too. There's some things with the IOC that makes you go: :blink::huh:

The Delta Center in Salt Lake (the figure skating & short-track venue) had to become the "Olympic Ice Arena" for the duration of the Salt Lake Games.

That's just how it goes with the Olympic Games.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Wow! You learn something new all the time. I didn't realise the Boxing kangaroo was partly a german creation. The kind of fact CAF likes!

ohh - I wasn't aware that there were no "boxing kangaroos" in Australia before that German silent movie!!!

I always thaught that "boxing kangaroos" were quite common in Australia and Max and Emil Skladanowsky used the idea for his silent movie: "Das boxende Känguruh" - Max and Emil Skladanowsky invented the "bioscope" (a duplex projector), which made it possible to show movies a paying audience - therewith they are in a way the inventors of cinemas, too.

The first cinema show took place in the variete theatre "Wintergarten" in Berlin at November 21st, 1895 (Lumiere showed a paying audience a movie appr. 30 days later)

... maybe you interested in that movie - here is it: Das boxende Känguruh (when you look carefully you can read "Skladanowsky" in the left upper corner on that wall behind the boxing roo)

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Here's the full story:

Boxing kangaroo here to stay

The giant boxing kangaroo flag will continue to fly in the athletes' village in Vancouver after Australian Olympic bosses reached an agreement with the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

The flag hangs over two storeys of the apartment block where the Australians are staying.

The IOC wanted it removed but Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) president John Coates says he has reached a compromise and it can now stay in place for the duration of the Winter Olympic Games.

"But we will need to register the boxing kangaroo with the IOC as the third identification we have," he said.

While it is already an Australian Olympic trademark, the boxing kangaroo will now be registered with the IOC along with Australia's national flag and the coat of arms.

The IOC initially asked the Australian team to take down the banner because it was deemed too commercial.

Calls to ban the boxing kangaroo flag was branded as scandalous, ridiculous and infantile.

ABC News

Yeah! We've saved the Roo!

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