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Cross Country Coaches Fed Up Whit Russia


Fox334

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http://www.ctvolympics.ca/cross-country-sk...ckdown+russians

Basically, a bunch of Cross Country coaches are starting to feel that Russia is falling way behind in term of catching dopers. Its hard to blame them, really, when you consider Russia's strong and proud tradition in Cross Country / Biathlon doping... After all, Russia lost an Olympic gold medal in a distance event to doping during both the 2002 and 2006 games. Russia has had eight national team Cross Country skiers banned for doping in the last eight year, on top of 2 that retired when the charges where brought against them. So coaches from 20 countries met to demand that the Russian Ski Federation be disciplined in case of any more doping cases, whit a Canadian coach going as far as to say that the entire Russian team ought to be banned from Vancouver (if memory serves right, the Russian rowing team nearly got banned from Beijing due to multiple doping offenses).

So, a lot of hot air or legitimate complaints?

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Legitimate, the Russians have had a disgracefully record in this decade, not only in cross-country and biathlon but also in distance running. I have said before that WADA should push for a 5 infraction standard over four years. If a country receives 5 infractions in 4 years the entire country is banned from the sport for 4 years.

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Legitimate, the Russians have had a disgracefully record in this decade, not only in cross-country and biathlon but also in distance running. I have said before that WADA should push for a 5 infraction standard over four years. If a country receives 5 infractions in 4 years the entire country is banned from the sport for 4 years.

Why should innocent athletes be punished for the mistakes of those who do dope? Whilst countries should be implementing stricter doping procedures, it is imperative that WADA addresses this from the administrative level. Of course, honest doping procedures have to be implemented but similarly, I think it is unfair to punish people who have never failed a drugs test just because they are from the same country as those who do. By that standard for example, US track athletes would never compete!

Also, the distance runners you allude to never actually failed a drugs test - they were banned on suspicion of fiddling drugs tests. There was actually some controversy with the IAAF over the issue as many athletes and commentators felt it was taking drug policing too far.

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Why should innocent athletes be punished for the mistakes of those who do dope? Whilst countries should be implementing stricter doping procedures, it is imperative that WADA addresses this from the administrative level. Of course, honest doping procedures have to be implemented but similarly, I think it is unfair to punish people who have never failed a drugs test just because they are from the same country as those who do. By that standard for example, US track athletes would never compete!

Also, the distance runners you allude to never actually failed a drugs test - they were banned on suspicion of fiddling drugs tests. There was actually some controversy with the IAAF over the issue as many athletes and commentators felt it was taking drug policing too far.

There was a fair few that have failed between Athens and Beijing. The big Greek doping bust before Beijing also included a few Russians.

And that is exactly the point, encourage a culture that doesn't tolerate doping at all within the rank and file athletes. And if 5 'elite' athletes in the same sport from the same country in a short time test positive there is clearly something systemic about it. Remember the huge disgrace that the 2001 Nordic World Championships were when 6 Finnish athletes tested positive. 6 at one event, if that doesn't deserve a national ban or similar events than how are you going to deal with it. If Jamaica was threatened with a complete ban from athletes, meaning Bolt and their other stars wouldn't be able to compete again until 2013, the Jamaicans might take doping a little more seriously, same with the Russians, Spaniards and Greeks were doping is a non-issue.

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I personally find it ridiculous that not every country have the same standard of testing. Its completely unfair, to be honest. Every athlete in the world should be subject to the EXACT same test policies, and they should ALL be handled by WADA, not national federations.

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There was a fair few that have failed between Athens and Beijing. The big Greek doping bust before Beijing also included a few Russians.

And that is exactly the point, encourage a culture that doesn't tolerate doping at all within the rank and file athletes. And if 5 'elite' athletes in the same sport from the same country in a short time test positive there is clearly something systemic about it. Remember the huge disgrace that the 2001 Nordic World Championships were when 6 Finnish athletes tested positive. 6 at one event, if that doesn't deserve a national ban or similar events than how are you going to deal with it. If Jamaica was threatened with a complete ban from athletes, meaning Bolt and their other stars wouldn't be able to compete again until 2013, the Jamaicans might take doping a little more seriously, same with the Russians, Spaniards and Greeks were doping is a non-issue.

Every effort should be made to catch dopers. Of course, the fight should be made by the national authorities aswell. Therefore, there should be sanctions against the national bodies. It should be made that nations can only compete if they are actively incorporating WADAS standards and each nation must be implementing the doping procedures fairly and equally. Jamaica, as you allude to for example, has no doping authority and thus Usain Bolt gets tested less that people from Europe which is very unfair. There has to be a universally agreed standard and all nations have to implement it - not just some. I agree with you there.

But to ban athletes on behalf of fellow countrymen's failed doping tests is morally wrong. Each person is their own person and has to be counted individually. You stand and fall by your own actions. Imagine being an American athlete; training your whole life, blood sweat and tears, making the Olympic team; then getting told you are banned because other athletes like Marion Jones and Justin Gatlin, who have no bearing on you failed doping tests. How is that fair?

Actually, the way athletes are tested is quite silly. 80% of doping tests are carried out during championships. However, when athletes dope they do so in cycles which happens in the off season. If you are Jamaican, like Usain Bolt, and you only get 1 or 2 tests whereas Europeans are getting in excess of 15, it makes it easier to cheat as you have time to get the drugs in your system, train on them and get them out of your system thus evading being caught. There has to be much more targeted year round testing instead of leaving it to championships.

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Drug cheats are dirtbags. Sport leadership who encourage cheating or turn a blind eye to it are dirtbags. But the onus should always be on WADA's system catching cheats.

Cross country's been a mess for years: thank Gawd Beckie Scott spoke out in Salt Lake. She was given a hard time at first; she was given her deservedly won gold medal a few years later.

If you cheat to win, you didn't win.

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I agree that punishing innocent athletes with a cross-board ban is not productive, but considering some federal governments are heavily involved with their NOCs at propaganda levels and/or NOCs are often collectively ignorant of regulations (instead of selectively in certain sports; unlikely) it may be necessary collateral damage. Forcing all athletes out would cause a ruckus and transfer the conflict from WADA, the sport federation, competing NOCs (the OG platform in general) to an internal conflict amongst those in affected NOC, where it should be resolved amongst their own athletes and officials in the first place. All of the federations and arbitration committees can't change the mentality of the NOC's team, they can only punish them after the fact.

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