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Rafa

2010 WORLD CUP STADIA

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Five new stadiums to be built for World Cup

South Africa is to refurbish five existing stadiums and build five new venues for the 2010 World Cup, in terms of an agreement with international football association Fifa.

Briefing the media at parliament on Monday, deputy Sport Minister Gert Oosthuizen said new stadiums would be built at Polokwane in Limpopo, Mbombela in Mpumalanga, in the Nelson Mandela Metro in the Eastern Cape, in KwaZulu-Natal's Ethekweni Metro and in Cape Town.

He said the Cape Town stadium - on the site of the existing Green Point Track - would be a "totally new facility", and would include a dome that could be closed in bad weather. The stadium is located on the edge of the CBD and would have the backdrop of table mountain as well as the city, and would also   be adjacent to the atlantic ocean.

Stadiums to be refurbished and upgraded included three in Gauteng - Soccer City, Ellis Park and Loftus Versveld - as well as the Royal Bafokeng stadium in North West, and Vodacom Park in Bloemfontein.

Oosthuizen said the government had allocated R242-million for planning the stadiums.

"The spread of the announced stadiums show the government acted swiftly to scrap the imbalance between rugby and soccer fields.

"The five new stadiums will be owned by the municipalities on behalf of the citizens of South Africa," he said.

Education Minister Naledi Pandor said building or refurbishing the stadiums would provide opportunities for communities and institutions to show their skills in construction, tourism and marketing. - Sapa

mock design of the location of the stadium to be constructed in cape town..possibly the future olympic stadium if an athletics track is included...

capetowndome24lz.jpg

capetowndome6ay.jpg

capetownopen13az.jpg

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THE proposed all-weather stadium to be built at Green Point in Cape Town ahead of the 2010 Soccer World Cup will cost about R1,2bn, a city official said today.

The City of Cape Town’s chief operating officer, Rushj Lehutso was speaking to reporters after central government announced that five new stadiums would be built for the event.

Lehutso said the R1,2bn was a preliminary figure from quantity surveyors for the cost of the 68,000 seater stadium alone, and did not include associated infrastructure such as roads, or the plan to develop a world class inner city park on the surrounding Green Point Common.

Western Cape premier Ebrahim Rasool said national government had allocated money for World Cup infrastructure, and the province and city would also look at their own budgets.

These were the three "logical sources" of funding for the stadium.

He also said the stadium could be the "deposit" on the city’s ambitions for a future Olympic Games.

Minister in the Presidency Essop Pahad, who is a member of the World Cup Local Organising Committee (LOC), said the stadium identified as Cape Town’s premier venue for the World Cup at the time SA made its bid had been Newlands.

Since then there had been a great deal of discussion with soccer governing body Fifa.

There were many who had wanted the Athlone stadium to take the honours, but to host a semifinal a stadium had to seat at least 65,000, and there was "no way" Athlone could go beyond 45,000.

Newlands also had capacity problems, he said.

Essop added that though the LOC had not yet taken a decision on allocation of semi-finals, Cape Town had a lot of the infrastructure required to host one.

Rasool said the R165m budget for the upgrading of Athlone, which could be used for World Cup warm-up friendlies and as a training ground, remained intact.

Meanwhile, Deputy Sport Minister Gert Oosthuizen said yesterday the new stadium would include a dome that could be closed in bad weather.

The five new stadiums would be owned by municipalities.

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Oh, great graphics - did you do it?

Could you post more pics from stadia for WC 2010

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hey i will soon

yes i did those graphics...if u wanna see more i can show u soon..

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some more views of my design, apologies that they so dark..but google earth is a bit messed up

stadiaviewsmultiple6vv.jpg

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:) Mo Rush,

Would the Cape Town facility be built in an are that would have complementry Olympic facilities constructed around it for when the time comes...?

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well the stadium is intended to be part of a central city centre park zone...so the space for olympic facilities to complement it would be available and unlike london 2012..a park would already exist if an olympic park was to be planned around the new stadium...however not too many facilties will be built prob because traffic and transport even for 2010 might be anightmare so it may force them to find other solutions such as underground rail and monorails...which are all currently being considered for 2010...the city of course will benefit the most with all the improvements..an olympic village site might be a problem though..even though the space would be available...

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Looks like there is a bit of concern about whether South Africa can be ready on time.

SOUTH AFRICA: STRUGGLING SOUTH AFRICA RAISES FEARS OVER HOSTING OF WORLD CUP

As power blackouts hit the country's biggest cities, the ANC's opposition question whether they will ever be ready for 2010

By R W JOHNSON

WHEN South Africa won the right to stage the 2010 football World Cup - the first country in Africa to do so - there was national rejoicing. The country had placed such importance on winning that Nelson Mandela and a raft of ministers were sent to Geneva to lobby Fifa, the game's world governing body.

Now, however, serious doubts are emerging about the country's readiness and ability to stage the event.

"I am terribly worried," said Donald Lee, the opposition Democratic Alliance's spokesman on sport. "I don't think the government yet understands what it takes."

Polls show that one-third of South Africans do not believe their country will be ready.

Power blackouts have recently hit all the big cities and the country's telecommunications have been revealed as grossly inadequate. The new mayor of Cape Town, Helen Zille, has now blocked the building of a showpiece 68,000-seat stadium demanded by Fifa.

The stakes could hardly be higher. Sepp Blatter won election as Fifa president thanks to his promise to give Africa a World Cup and the loss of face South Africa would suffer if the event had to go elsewhere would do incalculable damage to the African National Congress (ANC) government.

Fifa demands that all host cities sign contracts guaranteeing dedicated traffic lanes for its officials and players, the cessation of all building work throughout the tournament, free office space, unlimited food and drink for its personnel, telephone, internet and communications equipment and large-scale infrastructure works including back-up power grids - not just to keep the lights on in stadiums but to ensure that street lights, traffic lights and hotel lifts are fully functioning. Currently no South African city can promise this.

South Africa's infrastructure is decaying. In Johannesburg street and traffic lights do not work in large areas of the city, weeds grow in the road and routine maintenance has all but ceased. Public transport is virtually nonexistent and the roads are quite unable to cope with traffic volumes.

Recent blackouts in the Cape resulted in huge road jams as traffic lights failed and saw hundreds trapped in office lifts, billions lost in agriculture and industry and horrific sewage spills that have made the water dangerous to drink.

Despite steeply rising demand, not a single power station has been built since the ANC came to power in 1994. "This was an entirely foreseeable crisis,", said Andrew Kenny, an independent power consultant. "Year by year, government watched demand rise sharply and did nothing. It ignored all warnings."

Fani Zulu, a spokesman for Eskom, the state electricity company, said there was no need to panic. The company was fast-tracking ways to produce substantial extra capacity by 2010, he said.

But many analysts dismiss this as wholly inadequate. "It takes seven to eight years to build a big new station from scratch," said Kenny. "Nothing started now will be ready by 2010."

Sentech, the state company that handles the broadcasting distribution network, has declared that its equipment is antiquated. "We are not ready," said a spokesman, warning that the country "will suffer a severe loss of reputation if it fails to deliver on its obligations to Fifa". Sentech's chief executive, Sebiletso Mokone-Matabane, said there could be chaos if the transmission system breaks down, as she fears it could.

A spokesman for Fifa said it was "totally confident" that 2010 would be "a tremendous success". Fifa draws its confidence from the fact that South Africa successfully hosted the 1995 rugby World Cup - but that was a far smaller event and the country could then rely on the infrastructure that white South Africa had bequeathed.

THE SUNDAY TIMES

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The US is ready!!  :laughlong:

Considering the concerns raised about Brazil's readiness for 2014, and now this, it's not such a far-fetched idea that the USA could take one over.

Couple these with the doubts over New Delhi's 2010 CWGs preparations, and it looks like the upcoming "new frontiers" hostings are looking a little shakey.

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