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mr.x

The Olympic Cauldron

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I like how the top of each tube thing angles up and becomes parallel with the ground.

Maybe too early to say, but I think it's great. I don't automatically see anything thin and flame-burning as a cigarette.

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Actually no. There is a 4 continent, 5 continent, 5 continent alternative, 6 continent and 7 continent theory. The one used depends roughly on the language you speak. Most Europeans use the 5 continent alternative. Its just the English speaking world that views North and South America as different continents instead of one continuous sociopolitical-geographical entity.

It's even more complicated. At least here in Germany, we distinguish "Erdteile" and "Kontinente". "Kontinente" are the large land masses or areas Eurasia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas. So that would be the 4 continent theory. "Erdteile", on the other hand, are the smaller portions of the "Kontinente", i.e. Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania, North America and South America. So that would be the 6 continent theory. So we have two continent theories in only one (our) language. ;)

The IOC has corrected that interpretation in recent years. Rather than 'representing the continents' which are debatable, they now say that the colors of the 5 rings represent at least one color in every nation's flag. So that kinda shoots down the incorrect notion that the IOC only views the world as "5" continents.

Well, your "great-granddaddy" said in the year 1931: "The Olympic flag ... has a white background, with five interlaced rings in the centre: blue, yellow, black, green and red ... This design is symbolic ; it represents the five inhabited continents of the world, united by Olympism, while the six colors are those that appear on all the national flags of the world at the present time." (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olympic_symbols#Flag)

So it's new to me that the IOC has corrected meanwhile what its own founder had in mind when he invented that flag and those rings.

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It's four chopsticks around a totem pole?

There you have it -- another Olympic cauldron is associated with food, after Atlanta's "burning french fries container". :lol:

No, sorry -- maybe it'll grow on me once it's lit. But at least now, I'm disappointed of Vancouver's outdoor cauldron.

By the way, I expect the indoor cauldron to look different. Because I can't imagine such a rather complex, grid-like structure rising out of BC Place's ground. I suppose that the indoor cauldron will rather be a classical flame dish or bowl, comparable to Calgary's or Sydney's cauldron. They can hide such a round and rather compact structure easier in the ground, I reckon. Especially since the hole in BC Place's ground is most likely a round one.

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The hole dug into the subfloor of BCPl.was rectilinear.

Really? Did somebody tell you that or were there even pictures I've missed? I for my part noticed that the centre of BC Place's infield seemed to be covered with a round plate on the leaked rehearsal pictures. It was only very vaguely recognisable.

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Well, this tee-pee thing is fun to look at, but it is a bit "70's urban art". I like the weight of it but the broad base takes away from the elan you might associate with an Olympic Cauldron. I keep thinking there may be more to this design which the shots don't reveal.

At Jack Poole Plaza at the convention centre:

470_bc_cauldron_100209.jpg

470_bc_cauldron_tarp_100209.jpg

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I think it really is too early to call ineffective visually (meaning ugly)...

The photo-op they are going for is across the water, with the Olympic Rings in the foreground, and the Vancouver downtown skyline in the background... not awkwardly from above, framed by ugly scaffolding, and in a grainy, low quality photograph.

Context counts.

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There were pictures, several were posted among these threads. Even to accomodate a round structure, you would likely cut a square or rectangle void which would be much easier to execute and would cost less. There could easily be a primary floor structure added with a round hole, if you wanted to see a round opening from above.

Really? Did somebody tell you that or were there even pictures I've missed? I for my part noticed that the centre of BC Place's infield seemed to be covered with a round plate on the leaked rehearsal pictures. It was only very vaguely recognisable.

I don't think it's ugly, I like how complex it looks. I would suggest the design is intended for more viewing vantage points than you mentioned.

I think it really is too early to call ineffective visually (meaning ugly)...

The photo-op they are going for is across the water, with the Olympic Rings in the foreground, and the Vancouver downtown skyline in the background... not awkwardly from above, framed by ugly scaffolding, and in a grainy, low quality photograph.

Context counts.

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I don't think it's ugly, I like how complex it looks. I would suggest the design is intended for more viewing vantage points than you mentioned.

I know you weren't, I'm just saying. And the view from across the water at Stanley Park seems like it will be the most photographed and most memorable, that's what I mean.

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OK, despite the rectangular shape of the hole I don't think the indoor cauldron will be a copy of the outdoor cauldron. It's not difficult to push the vertical pipe out of the ground -- but it's more difficult (if not impossible) to push those diagonal pipes out of the ground and have them "interlocking" with the other diagonal pipes properly. Or they have the whole cauldron already completely assembled and simply have put it on a platform which raises it out of the hole.

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What about the cauldron at Whistler? Was that plinth really a signpost there and at the Vancouver Athletes Village?

Also the BCpl. Cauldron was said to be water cooled, wonder if that is true?

Edited by stirthesoul

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What about the cauldron at Whistler? Was that plinth really a signpost there and at the Vancouver Athletes Village?

It probably was seeing as there is an identical one at the Vancouver Village (where we can agree there won't be a flame). Would be weird to have one of those things be a cauldron and the other a signpost.

I suppose the cauldron at Whistler will be where the medal ceremonies will take place, not at the Village.

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470_bc_cauldron_100209.jpg

I'm really fascinated by this thing! As I look at it more, it really looks like a jet engine pinned/cradled in the intersection of the 4 legs. I like it a lot (I like everything technical) but what is the "point of view" behind this design??? It is NOTHING like I would have expected from "supernatural" Vancouver. There is almost no consideration for nature in the design, and it is blatantly industrial. I guess the 5 flames-points could represent the (4) nations and (1) modern Canada, or (5) Olympic rings.......but man is it aggressive!

I love it, it's boldly stepping out somewhere, just not sure where yet.

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*I did not look at the video, don't want to see much beforehand Friday night.

I know I've said it's too early to tell, but here's my take on the cauldron - if only on the design's meaning.

I really like the bondfire interpretation. Vancouver's Olympic identity isn't so much about the natural and organic, but about the fusionbetween the natural and organic, and the urban and the modern. You see this everywhere:

  1. Contemporay take on an Inukshuk in the logo.
  2. The mascots are Aboriginal myths done in a contempory look (which people inaccurately interperet as Asian anime but whatever...)
  3. The torch depics the vastness of the winter Canadian landscape but in a sleek, modern design.
  4. The Look of the Games illustrates that Vancouver is a place where the natural and urban are so closely intertwined.

Apply this theme to the cauldron and we get a timeless, organic concept of the bondfire reimagined in a shiny, modern finish. And the use five five tubes allows for broader interpretation: Canadian idenity of mutliple cultures, histories, and peoples coming together as one, First Nations and modern Canada, the five rings, and so on...

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470_bc_cauldron_100209.jpg

I'm really fascinated by this thing! As I look at it more, it really looks like a jet engine pinned/cradled in the intersection of the 4 legs. I like it a lot (I like everything technical) but what is the "point of view" behind this design??? It is NOTHING like I would have expected from "supernatural" Vancouver. There is almost no consideration for nature in the design, and it is blatantly industrial. I guess the 5 flames-points could represent the (4) nations and (1) modern Canada, or (5) Olympic rings.......but man is it aggressive!

I love it, it's boldly stepping out somewhere, just not sure where yet.

Those are rejected jet engine prototypes from who else? ...Bombardier (who made the torches).

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that is the same questions i've been wondering about. i wonder how they will incorporate that in to the lighting at BCP, if at all. from what i've read some ppl have said that in the past olympics, the secondary cauldrons are lit w/ little notice...

Are they going to light it with the actual Olympic flame?

If so, is it incorporated into the relay, or do they light it afterwards with a branch of the original flame?

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Are they going to light it with the actual Olympic flame?

If so, is it incorporated into the relay, or do they light it afterwards with a branch of the original flame?

That's the big question. I'm convinced that the outdoor cauldron will be lit shortly after the indoor cauldron and that they'll have some link to "connect" the two cauldrons. I very much fear they'll do it by fireworks and thus light at least the outdoor cauldron once more with an automatic lighter and not with the original Olympic Flame (just as in Torino). They won't have a wire connecting the two cauldrons, that's for sure -- due to the distance and BC Place's roof not allowing to send a flame through it. Or they'll do it in a very purist way, showing the cauldron lighting inside BC Place and then simply switching the cameras to Jack Pool Plaza where a second final torchbearer (or a second team of torchbearers) is waiting with Olympic torches and he or they simply light the cauldron by dipping the torch into the burners of the cauldron.

But the latter scenario also might not happen because it looks as if there are no ladders or scaffolds directly around the tubes of the cauldron on which a torchbearer could stand and light the burners. So there'll probably be no human beings lighting the outdoor cauldron -- or they'll be able to light the bases of the tubes, with the fire crawling up to the burners (à la Moscow 1980 or Los Angeles 1984).

img_59031.jpg

img_59082.jpg

(Source: http://vigil100107.wordpress.com/)

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*I did not look at the video, don't want to see much beforehand Friday night.

I know I've said it's too early to tell, but here's my take on the cauldron - if only on the design's meaning.

I really like the bondfire interpretation. Vancouver's Olympic identity isn't so much about the natural and organic, but about the fusionbetween the natural and organic, and the urban and the modern. You see this everywhere:

  1. Contemporay take on an Inukshuk in the logo.
  2. The mascots are Aboriginal myths done in a contempory look (which people inaccurately interperet as Asian anime but whatever...)
  3. The torch depics the vastness of the winter Canadian landscape but in a sleek, modern design.
  4. The Look of the Games illustrates that Vancouver is a place where the natural and urban are so closely intertwined.

Apply this theme to the cauldron and we get a timeless, organic concept of the bondfire reimagined in a shiny, modern finish. And the use five five tubes allows for broader interpretation: Canadian idenity of mutliple cultures, histories, and peoples coming together as one, First Nations and modern Canada, the five rings, and so on...

Oh gee...you're reading so much into this. :blink:

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