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New National Olympic Committees


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I know it is too far off to predict what new NOC's there'll be, but why don't we just for fun assume the following likely situations will happen by 2016 (ordered from most likely to least likely in my opinion):

Kosovo is recognized by the IOC

Netherlands Antilles dissolves, making Curaco and Saint Maarten (SP?) independent nations.

Macau finally gets their act together and gets IOC recognition

New Caledonia declares its independence from France (there'll be a referendum in 2014)

Denmark allows Greenland to have an NOC

Morrocco finally gives up on Western Sahara

France lets go of Martinique

There are finally enough people in Anguilla for them to decide to form an NOC.

Where would this put our new theoretical participants?

Transfered from the Rio de Janeiro section:

That is an interesting issue - maybe we should start a new thread in the "General Olympics section" - it is astonishing that the dependent territories of France have no own NOC, but the British, American, Dutch

Furthermore I think we have to differ between the overseas territories and the overseas departments of France - since e.g. Martinique, Guadeloupe, French Guyana belong to France as overseas departments - e.g. French Polynesia or New Caledonia are overseas territories...

Edited by Citius Altius Fortius
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I think the abscence of French territories at the games has to do with the idea of French unity. Under the tricouleur, everyone is French. It's not like the British commonwealth where the Commonwealth itself is made of many parts, instead many parts make the whole.

New Caledonia and French Polynesia have a little more autonomy, and are allowed to compete in the South Pacific Games. Noumea, the capital of New Caledonia, is even set to host the next Games in 2011. However, if any athletes win qualifying events, they do not advance to the Olympics. Other departments have less autonomy and therefore don't even get to compete in regional games. Although, I believe some of these departments have FIFA soccer teams. Tahiti (French Polynesia) recently participated in the U-20 World Cup, qualifying by defeating New Caledonia in a regional tournament. If I'm no mistaken, Martinique has a national soccer team too.

Long story short, it's a complicated political issue in French society.

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Sint Marteen and Curacao will not become independent but autonomous regions within the Netherlands and because they are not independent they will not gain an NOC. How they compete at the Olympics after this is unknown, the other 3 islands will compete as part of the Netherlands.

Kosovo will not be recognized until the UN does and that is not going to happen anytime soon.

And its not about the parent country to allow an NOC, the IOC will only recognize sovereign states now, therefore any new member most be a recognized sovereign state by the UN. And for Greenland there is about equal support for becoming a territory of Canada, becoming independent or staying within Denmark.

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And its not about the parent country to allow an NOC, the IOC will only recognize sovereign states now, therefore any new member most be a recognized sovereign state by the UN.

... mhh- that is a way of approach, but I think that this is unfair for non-independent territories which have no NOC so far - why is e.g. Aruba allowed to participate but not Curacao?

Edited by Citius Altius Fortius
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... mhh- that is a way of approach, but I think that this is unfair for non-independent territories which have no NOC so far - why is e.g. Aruba allowed to participate but not Curacao?

They are grandfathered. NOC used to be able to represent theritories, but they now represent countries. The current NOCs from non-independent regions are allowed to exist much for the same reason that FIFA allows Football teams from the likes of the Faeroe Islands.

Its also worth mentioning that some NOCs came before the country they represent (for example, India participated in the Olympics both before and after its independence).

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Is there any interest from Canada about taking on Greenland? I haven't heard of that before??

If the Greenlanders wanted to become part of Canada they would be more then welcome to I assume. They would become the 4th territory most likely.

Becoming part of Canada?! - when I went to Greenland last year the talk was on greater independance from Denmark rather than moving towards a whole new protector country.

If it were to ever happen, unlikely though. They would become an intergrated part of Canada and not a protectorate, oversees department etc. They would hold the same status as Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut. The reason its always been floated to become part of Canada instead of full independence is because they are the same people, they are all Inuit. So reuniting with the other part of the Inuit population is seen as good by some on both sides of the strait.

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Has anyone heard of Shara Proctor? She represented Anguilla at the recent IAAF World Championships in Athletics, in the long jump. She made the finals, finishing 6th overall. Unfortunately, she may never compete in the Olympics. Not only does Anguilla not have a National Olympic Committee, but it's not an independent, sovereign nation recognized by the UN. The only way that she could is if she represented some other country, for instance Great Britain. Technically, she could, as Anguillans have British citizenship and I assume free access to Great Britain. Since she represented Anguilla internationally, she would have to sit out competition for two years unless the Anguillan federation waives that two-year period. And there's no guarantee that she would make the British team either. It's no shame to represent Great Britain, especially in 2012, but it's a real shame that she can't represent Anguilla at the Olympic Games, especially since she has the talent to compete among the best in the world.

I personally think that the IOC should relax its ruling that only sovereign nations recognized by the UN can compete in the Olympics. The IOC doesn't have a rule limiting the number of NOCs participating in the Olympics, and many of them won't win an Olympic medal for some time. I see no harm in athletes from Tahiti, Greenland, Macau, or even Gibraltar competing for said places separate from their mother countries in the Olympics. I think that it's feasible. You just need to reduce some quotas, reduce bureaucratic tape, reduce unnecessary officials, and you'll have enough room for more sports and more NOCs participating.

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And its not about the parent country to allow an NOC, the IOC will only recognize sovereign states now, therefore any new member most be a recognized sovereign state by the UN. And for Greenland there is about equal support for becoming a territory of Canada, becoming independent or staying within Denmark.

How then would you explain Palestine's recognition by the IOC despite lack of recognition from the UN? Is this some sort of new policy adopted under Rogge or something?

I was also unaware of the whole Canada/Greenland thing. I guess I understand the Inuit connection, but they'd still be under another nation's authority. It seems kinda random; when I read that I was like "Whaaaaa??" :huh: Everything I've read on Greenland's political status has been independence vs. loyalty to Denmark.

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On a random note, I heard Alaska actually tried to have an Olympic team at one point in the 1950's. They were unable to send anyone to Melbourne 1956, and by the time the next games rolled around they had become a state. I don't know how true that is, but I guess it's kinda funny.

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How then would you explain Palestine's recognition by the IOC despite lack of recognition from the UN? Is this some sort of new policy adopted under Rogge or something?

I was also unaware of the whole Canada/Greenland thing. I guess I understand the Inuit connection, but they'd still be under another nation's authority. It seems kinda random; when I read that I was like "Whaaaaa??" :huh: Everything I've read on Greenland's political status has been independence vs. loyalty to Denmark.

It happened some time in the late 90's and their acceptance of Palestine was most likely the catalyst for the move.

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How then would you explain Palestine's recognition by the IOC despite lack of recognition from the UN? Is this some sort of new policy adopted under Rogge or something?

I was also unaware of the whole Canada/Greenland thing. I guess I understand the Inuit connection, but they'd still be under another nation's authority. It seems kinda random; when I read that I was like "Whaaaaa??" :huh: Everything I've read on Greenland's political status has been independence vs. loyalty to Denmark.

Both FIFA and the IOC have more countries represented on them than the UN.

The IOC probably accepted the Palestine because it is an autonomous territory, like most of the Commonwealth small fiscal havens, and the Palestinians would not be able to compete under the Israeli flag.

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- Greenland a part of Canada? Unlikely. The Greenlandic independence movement is based around not being stuck in a political stranglehold by Copenhagen, and it's unlikely they would want just change the stranglehold to Ottawa. The fact that most people there, about 80%, are Inuit is irrelevant. That's like saying everybody who speaks English should live in one country, or everybody who is Chinese should live in one country, that's just not the case. Greenland does field "national" teams in quite a few unofficial ways. It participates in the World Island Games and the soccer cup which I forget the name of that is put on by solely unrecognized states with their own organized teams.

- Palestine is recognized by the IOC because Palestine is capable of fielding it's own team without (much) objection, its existence isn't contested by IOC members, or even the Israeli NOC for that matter, and it was already largely in existence before the rules had stricter definitions.

- @Roux- The Canadian territories and Alaska all at one point wanted to field teams to the games, as was the trend of national territories to do so before stricter IOC rules came along, but instead they created their own games movement in the late 60's which began in the 70's, mainly for youth-aged participants, just for the northern regions. It's usually talked about here on the news when it happens. Harper was in attendance at the last one. Greenland participates in this, also.

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- Greenland a part of Canada? Unlikely. The Greenlandic independence movement is based around not being stuck in a political stranglehold by Copenhagen, and it's unlikely they would want just change the stranglehold to Ottawa. The fact that most people there, about 80%, are Inuit is irrelevant. That's like saying everybody who speaks English should live in one country, or everybody who is Chinese should live in one country, that's just not the case. Greenland does field "national" teams in quite a few unofficial ways. It participates in the World Island Games and the soccer cup which I forget the name of that is put on by solely unrecognized states with their own organized teams.

- Palestine is recognized by the IOC because Palestine is capable of fielding it's own team without (much) objection, its existence isn't contested by IOC members, or even the Israeli NOC for that matter, and it was already largely in existence before the rules had stricter definitions.

- @Roux- The Canadian territories and Alaska all at one point wanted to field teams to the games, as was the trend of national territories to do so before stricter IOC rules came along, but instead they created their own games movement in the late 60's which began in the 70's, mainly for youth-aged participants, just for the northern regions. It's usually talked about here on the news when it happens. Harper was in attendance at the last one. Greenland participates in this, also.

I said it was unlikely, but the idea is that Greenland can't survive without Danish aid, so reuniting with the other Inuit and becoming a full member of another country is more desirable because they could never become a full part of Denmark.

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- Palestine is recognized by the IOC because Palestine is capable of fielding it's own team without (much) objection, its existence isn't contested by IOC members, or even the Israeli NOC for that matter, and it was already largely in existence before the rules had stricter definitions.

Israel was actually not happy about this to begin with, and some politicians even talked about boycotting the Atlanta games (which was Palestine's Olympic debut) but they eventually grew to be ok with it.

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New Caledonia does have an Olympic flag. Politically, the French flag is their national flag. The government has it's own official flag, and there is another flag of the pro-independence movement that is unofficial.

New_Caledonia_Sports_Flag.gif

New Caledonia Olympic flag

NWCA0001.GIF

Pro-independence flag, would probably be national flag if independent.

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  • 5 years later...
IOC grants provisional recognition to Kosovo Olympic Committee

22/10/2014

The Executive Board (EB) of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) today granted provisional recognition to the Kosovo Olympic Committee and proposed that the NOC be granted full recognition at the next IOC Session to be held in December in Monaco.

The NOC of Kosovo was established in 1992 and has more than 30 affiliated National Federations (NFs), 13 of which are Olympic sports federations. Of these, six* are full members of their respective International Federations (IFs), while the other seven** are provisional or associate members of their respective IFs.

The EB noted that the NOC of Kosovo has met the requirements for recognition as outlined in the Olympic Charter. These include the sport and technical requirements as well as the definition of “country” as defined in Rule 30.1 – “an independent State recognised by the international community.” Kosovo is recognised as a country by 108 of the 193 UN Member States.

The decision was taken by the Executive Board in the interests of the athletes in Kosovo and to remove any uncertainty they may have. It will allow them to take part in qualifications for the Olympic Games Rio 2016 and in future editions of the Games.

*Table tennis, archery, judo, sailing, weightlifting, modern pentathlon

**Wrestling, boxing, curling, taekwondo, gymnastics, skiing, handball

IOC

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