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Thursday, Dec. 27, 2012

Inose eyes tweet pitches in English

New Tokyo Gov. Naoki Inose revealed his plan Tuesday to tweet in English on Twitter as a way to promote to a global audience the capital's bid to host the 2020 Summer Olympics.

"I'd like to start as soon as the checking system (for the English phrases) is ready," he said. "It can't just be, 'I've written them in English.' What's important is whether there is depth to my words, and that requires much thought."

On top of the obvious advantage of instant global transmission of Japan-related information, Inose is contemplating utilizing the media's one-on-one communication to directly interact with prominent figures abroad.

The governor is scheduled to attend a press conference for international media in London on Jan. 10 that will be sponsored by Tokyo's bidding committee.

Inose already uses Twitter to tweet his schedule and daily thoughts in Japanese

Kyodo

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/nn20121227a9.html

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How is 12 years too soon. Asia is the largest population base, the largest market, where most of the new sponsors are from, and has more potential hosts than other places. Asia deserves the Olympics

Tokyo 2020 Games bid to become official soon The Tokyo metropolitan government has decided to bid to host the 2020 Summer Olympics, and an official announcement is likely later this month, according

Consultants strategy meeting in Istanbul

Judo scandal hits Tokyo bid


Updated: February 8, 2013, 2:22 PM ET

Associated Press


TOKYO -- Just when Tokyo got a boost in its campaign to host the 2020 Olympics, a judo coaching scandal surfaced within the Japanese sporting culture and threatens to undermine the bid.


Tokyo bid officials were pleased on Jan. 30 when a poll showed that public support had risen to 73 percent, given that low public support had derailed the 2016 bid.


But the same day, the Japan Judo Federation revealed the head coach of the women's Olympic team, Ryuji Sonoda, had used violence against athletes at a training camp before the London Olympics. He resigned the next day.


The revelations raise concerns for Tokyo 2020 bid officials, knowing an IOC evaluation committee will visit in March. One of the main themes of Tokyo's bid is "athletes first."


On Friday, the Japanese Olympic Committee said a two-day preliminary hearing of its 31 Olympic sports federations found no cases of violence or harassment during training since the 2010 Vancouver Games.


Later Friday, the International Judo Federation issued a statement that members of the Japan women's judo team have been indefinitely suspended while an independent inquiry is opened into their complaints of ill treatment.


JOC secretary general Noriyuki Ichihara denied that officials were rushing investigations to wrap up the problem in time for the IOC evaluation visit to Tokyo.


"This is a huge problem for the entire sports community," Ichihara said at a news conference. "We are not rushing to deal with it just because the IOC is coming. This is going to take some time and patience."


Tokyo governor Naoki Inose has said he doesn't think the scandal will hurt Tokyo's bid. The JOC issued a statement saying it would conduct further investigations into the use of physical violence in judo and all sports, this time interviewing athletes.


The judo federation revealed in late January that 15 female judoka sent a letter to the JOC at the end of 2012 that indicated they had been subjected to harassment and physical violence by Sonoda at a pre-Olympic training camp. The federation, which knew about the problem since September when some of the women first raised the issue, still decided to renew Sonoda's contract.


Sonoda tried to justify his behavior by saying he was under tremendous pressure to produce gold-medal winners in London. He said he didn't think slapping was considered violence and that he was trained in the same way.


Sports minister Hakubun Shimomura has described the situation as the most serious crisis in Japan's sports history.


"The sports community must make concerted efforts to go back to the fundamental principle that violence should be eradicated from sports instruction," Shimomura said.


Days after Sonoda stepped down, two-time Olympic judo champion Masato Uchishiba was sentenced to five years in prison for raping a female member of a university judo club in 2011.


Naoki Ogi, a former teacher and popular social critic, attributes the corporal punishment to poor coaching techniques

.

"Corporal punishment is an easy solution for instructors who lack leadership and skills, who know they won't be challenged," Ogi wrote on his blog. "It's a dirty trick."


Ogi suggests the JOC and the judo federation coordinated their responses to the scandal.


"They must be colluding," Ogi said, adding that the JOC should have launched its own investigation a long time ago. "There is no doubt this ongoing scandal will affect (Tokyo's) Olympic bid. It's a pity."


The complaints by the 15 women were initially ignored by the judo federation, which has no women on its 26-member executive board, so they decided to take it to the JOC.


"We were deeply hurt both mentally and physically because of violence and harassment taken upon us by former coach Sonoda, in the name of guidance. It went far beyond what it should have," the women said in a joint statement released through their lawyers.


"Our dignity as humans was disgraced, which caused some of us to cry, and others to wear out. We participated in matches and training as we were constantly intimidated by the presence of the coach while we were forced to see our teammates suffer."


Sonoda was in London for the Olympics, where Japan won one gold medal in women's judo. Many in Japan have pointed out that his actions go against the Olympic charter, which bans violence.


Former Yomiuri Giants pitcher Masumi Kuwata, once one of the top pitchers in Japanese professional baseball, has spoken out against corporal punishment while revealing that he, too, was a victim of violence as a baseball player in elementary school.


"I don't think corporal punishment as a form of instruction makes one stronger," Kuwata said in an interview with NHK. "Those teaching sports need to change their methods to fit the times."


Judo holds a special place in Japanese society. Judo, which means "gentle way," was invented in Japan and was the first Japanese martial art to gain widespread international recognition, and the first to become an official Olympic sport at the 1964 Tokyo Games.


The sport's founder, Jigoro Kano, saw it as a pursuit that encompassed self-defense, physical culture and moral behavior. Kano was an educator and played a key role in making judo a part of the Japanese public school programs in the early 1900s. Women were banned from participating in matches until the 1970s and still face discrimination in promotions and ranks, former judo Olympian Noriko Mizoguchi said.


Author Robert Whiting, who detailed corporal punishment in Japanese baseball in his 1989 book "You Gotta Have Wa," said violence in Japanese sports traces its roots to martial arts.


"Corporal punishment is the legacy of the martial arts, where physical education means physical punishment and is considered a valid way of teaching," Whiting said. "Still evident all over Japan in all sports, it's very widespread. Screw up in practice and you get a slap on the head or a kick in the butt. That's how you learn."


At the time of Sonoda's resignation, the issue was in the spotlight following the suicide in December of a Japanese high school student who endured repeated beatings from his basketball coach. The student told his mother the day before he died that he had been struck 30 to 40 times by his coach.


The 47-year-old coach, whose name has not been disclosed, admitted slapping the teen when he made a mistake and said it was intended to "fire him up."


Corporal punishment at school is prohibited under Japan's Fundamental Law of Education, but some teachers still believe in the old ways.


According to the Education Ministry, about 400 corporal punishment cases are reported at public schools every year. In 2001, about one third of the cases resulted in injuries, mostly cuts and bruises to the head or the face. About a quarter of the school corporal punishment cases involve sports teams.


In 2009, a former sumo trainer was sentenced to six years in prison for his role in the fatal beating of a young wrestler during training. Former trainer Junichi Yamamoto ordered three wrestlers, in the name of instruction, to beat 17-year-old wrestler Tokitaizan, hitting him with beer bottles, a baseball bat and hosing him with cold water.


Despite the promises of reform, Whiting thinks the practices may be too entrenched in Japanese society for real change to occur.

"What makes Japanese different from the United States is that generally Japanese coaches put themselves above the players, like a military drill sergeant," Whiting said. "Sports is much more militaristic in Japan. That's the legacy of the martial arts, where a whack on the head is considered a form of teaching."



Copyright 2013 by The Associated Press


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In Promoting His City for 2020 Games, Tokyo’s Bid Chairman Tweaks Others

With less than five months to go before the International Olympic Committee chooses a city to host the 2020 Summer Games, the three remaining bidders — Istanbul, Madrid and Tokyo — are increasing their efforts to win over delegates and the public.

The Olympic committee’s rules prohibit bid committee members from directly criticizing other bids. Instead, the bidders often highlight the perceived strengths of their bids to note delicately what they believe to be their rivals’ shortcomings, something known in the communications industry as counter-positioning.

Naoki Inose, the governor of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government and chairman of the Tokyo 2020 bid, has often done that, highlighting his city’s extensive and efficient transportation system, as well as the financial and technical wherewithal to build first-class sports sites and housing for the athletes. He has also noted that, like Paris and London, Tokyo has hosted the Summer Games before, a claim that Istanbul and Madrid cannot make.

But Inose has also pushed the boundaries of rhetorical gamesmanship with occasionally blunt and candid statements about how his city compares with the competition, particularly Istanbul, which he has suggested is less developed and less equipped to host the Games.

“For the athletes, where will be the best place to be?” Inose said through an interpreter in a recent interview in New York. “Well, compare the two countries where they have yet to build infrastructure, very sophisticated facilities. So, from time to time, like Brazil, I think it’s good to have a venue for the first time. But Islamic countries, the only thing they share in common is Allah and they are fighting with each other, and they have classes.”

Asked later to elaborate on his characterization of Istanbul, a spokesman said Inose meant that simply being the first Islamic country to hold the Olympics was not a good enough reason to be chosen, just as being the first Buddhist country or the first Christian country would not be, either.

The spokesman said Inose did not mean to refer to “class.”

Istanbul is an Olympic finalist because it is an international city in one of the fastest-developing countries in the region. A member of NATO, Turkey straddles Europe and Asia and is a bridge between Christianity and Islam. With its emerging middle class, Turkey has become a political and economic powerhouse in the region.

This is Istanbul’s fifth bid to host the Olympic Games. In a statement, the city’s bid committee declined to address comments made by rival bidders.

“Istanbul 2020 completely respects the I.O.C. guidelines on bidding and therefore it is not appropriate to comment further on this matter,” the statement said.

The International Olympic Committee does not look kindly on overtly harsh attacks by bidders, and occasionally it sends letters of reprimand to those who break with protocol, former bidders said.

According to Article 14 of the Rules of Conduct for bidders: “Cities shall refrain from any act or comment likely to tarnish the image of a rival city or be prejudicial to it. Any comparison with other cities is strictly forbidden.”

Though untoward comments rarely disqualify a bid, they could raise doubts in the minds of I.O.C. delegates about the trustworthiness of a bidder.

“The reason the rule is there is that if someone deviates from it, it triggers a chain reaction,” said Mike Moran, chief spokesman for the United States Olympic Committee from 1978 to 2002 and a senior communications counselor for New York’s bid for the 2012 Summer Games. “The I.O.C. is very serious about their protocols.”

Moran added that negative comments by bidders would probably not hurt a bid, although “you never know how a comment might influence those I.O.C. members.”

At several points in the interview, Inose said that Japanese culture was unique and by implication superior, a widely held view in Japan. He noted that the political scientist Samuel P. Huntington wrote in his book “The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order” that Japan was unlike any other culture.

Inose also pointed to polls that showed 70 percent of Tokyoites in favor of hosting the Summer Games, up from 47 percent last year. The well-received London Games, he said, have helped generate enthusiasm and confidence that Tokyo can host a similarly successful event.

Tokyo, he added, is exceptional because the Imperial Palace, which is largely off-limits to residents and visitors, forms the city’s core while bustling activity surrounds it. “The central part of Tokyo has nothingness,” he said. “This is a unique way that society achieved modernization.”

Inose brushed aside the notion that Olympic delegates may favor Istanbul’s bid because Turkey has a far younger population than Japan and thus is fertile ground for developing the next generation of Olympic enthusiasts. While population growth has stalled in Japan, the population of Tokyo has grown because of an influx of younger people, he said. He added that although Japan’s population is aging, its elderly are reasonably healthy.

“We used to say that if you are poor, you have lots of kids, but we have to build infrastructure to accommodate a growing population,” Inose said. “What’s important is that seniors need to be athletic. If you’re healthy, even if you get older, health care costs will go down. The average age is 85 for women and 80 for men, so that demonstrates how stress-free” Japan’s society is.

“I’m sure people in Turkey want to live long,” he added. “And if they want to live long, they should create a culture like what we have in Japan. There might be a lot of young people, but if they die young, it doesn’t mean much.”

Inose has drawn distinctions between Japan and other cultures in other settings, too. When he visited London in January to promote Tokyo’s bid, he said Tokyo and London were sophisticated and implied that Istanbul was not.

“I don’t mean to flatter, but London is in a developed country whose sense of hospitality is excellent,” Inose told reporters. “Tokyo’s is also excellent. But other cities, not so much.”

Hmmmm. Blunt is a bit of an understatement. It's hovering incredibly over the line of criticising the opposition.

I suppose it shows they see Istanbul as the main rival.

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This reminds me of the comments made by the (then) mayor of Toronto while the city was bidding for the 2008 Olympics - regarding Africa. While it was not a dig at a rival 2008 bid, it was still an irrelevant and unqualified statement regarding another global region - a profoundly stupid thing for a high profile person to do while representing an Olympic campaign. Inose is the biggest fool in the scenario, he has drawn up lines in this campaign - a ridiculously silly thing to do given that it has the potential to backfire - some of this "Islamic bloc" may now switch previously Tokyo centric votes away from the Japanese, and send them the way of Madrid (assuming that they weren't even voting for Istanbul anyway).

Interesting too the reference to Huntington's Clash Theory- or yet another crude interpretation of it mask prejudice and fear - much like the Simpleton's in the Blasphemy thread.

Edited by runningrings
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He makes some interesting points in an incredibly ham-fisted way! I agree (at least with his spokesman's interpretation) that being the first Muslim country to host is hardly as enticing an argument as bringing the Games to South America for the first time. But then again, it is an argument in Istanbul's favour however small, so why bring it up?

"There might be a lot of young people, but if they die young, it doesn’t mean much."

There must've been a more tactful way of making this point too! :lol:

Tokyo needs to keep pushing its similarities with London. It needs to say, we've just had a developed mega-city repeat hosting and it was a success. We'll do the same and we can offer you huge revenues. Drawing lines in the sand against Istanbul is all well and good, but there's ways of going about that. And if you're going to bend the IOC's rules a little make sure you come out of it looking good (London did this a couple of times during its bid). The article starts by explaining the idea of counter-positioning. It seems Istanbul has a better handle on this than Tokyo, because this for me is a brilliant bit of counter-positioning (read with the emphasis on the first two words)....

Istanbul 2020 completely respects the I.O.C. guidelines on bidding and therefore it is not appropriate to comment further on this matter,”

Own goal from Tokyo.

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Super offensive, super boring bid, super expensive city, super smelly, super small accommodations, super anyplace but Tokyo.

Just not feelin the Japanese bid at all.

Lets give them another chance with the "Best Beaches Bid Index", my new rating scale to determine who will win the race based on Beach-ability.

Popular beaches near Tokyo:

82A891E48FEA91S8Ci.jpg

People+Carry+Portable+Shrine+Sea+Purific

enoshima-12.jpg

Enoshima.jpg

FH000028.jpg

hayamabeach.JPG

image003.jpg?w=450

On a scale from San Diego to Tulsa, and with special consideration for nuclear contamination Tokyo gets a Solid "Three Mile Island" in Beach-ability.

Edited by paul
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Ewwwwwwwwwwww!!

Well, that's why they all flock to Hawaii -- to Hawaii's benefit. And which is kinda ironic/Pyrrhic victory in that now, the sons and grandsons of the SOBs who hit Pearl Harbor now come to the Islands for their R&R.

ironic isn't it!

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Super offensive, super boring bid, super expensive city, super smelly, super small accommodations, super anyplace but Tokyo.

Just not feelin the Japanese bid at all.

Not getting a great feeling from any of the bids to be honest. Japan seems to be going about things in a really odd way of late (which is strange because they came out of the blocks really strongly), Istanbul is in a country led by a government which has been recently introducing laws which jail people for criticising Islam (brilliant!), and Spain is hardly in a great state and it hosted recently.

Flip a coin to eliminate one, then flip another to choose the winner.

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^I agree. Tokyo is still, however, a major global city, & I'm sure that aspect won't be ignored by IOC members.

I also said in another thread, that Istanbul isn't as much as a 'new-frontier' as some paint it out to be. Yeah, the religious aspect might be & "holding the Games on two continents, but that's not as great as a totally new continent, like South America or Africa, or 1/5 of humanity like China.

Although, it could be enough considering the there's only 3 candidates to chose from & one of those is in dire financial straits at this time.

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This reminds me of the comments made by the (then) mayor of Toronto while the city was bidding for the 2008 Olympics - regarding Africa. While it was not a dig at a rival 2008 bid, it was still an irrelevant and unqualified statement regarding another global region - a profoundly stupid thing for a high profile person to do while representing an Olympic campaign. Inose is the biggest fool in the scenario, he has drawn up lines in this campaign - a ridiculously silly thing to do given that it has the potential to backfire - some of this "Islamic bloc" may now switch previously Tokyo centric votes away from the Japanese, and send them the way of Madrid (assuming that they weren't even voting for Istanbul anyway).

Interesting too the reference to Huntington's Clash Theory- or yet another crude interpretation of it mask prejudice and fear - much like the Simpleton's in the Blasphemy thread.

Oh the irony that you misplaced the apostrophe in the word simpleton. lol.

Other than that I agree with you -- the Japanese guy has no place criticizing Islam or any aspect of it because as we all know, Islamic societies are the personification of perfection and uphold the ideals of the Olympic movement like no other society.

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Super offensive, super boring bid, super expensive city, super smelly, super small accommodations, super anyplace but Tokyo.

Just not feelin the Japanese bid at all.

Same. I wanted to support Tokyo, but it doesn't do much for me. I wouldn't mind a Tokyo Games, but it doesn't captivate me either.

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Sarcasm aside, are these criticisms actually going to help Tokyo 2020? You can praise his honesty if you like - and I agree with you that political Islam and the Olympic ideals are about as far removed as any two things can be - but I don't suppose it will get Tokyo anywhere to make this point.

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Oh the irony that you misplaced the apostrophe in the word simpleton. lol.

Nothing more dull than a person who ropes in minor written errors in building argument. FYI, I was using my mobile. I stand by my statement, certain people in the former thread use immensely simple, uneducated, broad sweeping assertions about things that are not as black and white as they might hope to back up their prejudices.

Other than that I agree with you -- the Japanese guy has no place criticizing Islam or any aspect of it because as we all know, Islamic societies are the personification of perfection and uphold the ideals of the Olympic movement like no other society.

Wonderful, sarcasm. But really - what Olympic host perfectly upholds "Olympic ideals". These ideals are very easy to promote when the IOC itself is not a State. If we're going to talk about culture, faith and history Japan isn't really squeaky clean either, having the dubious honour of being the "Germany" of Asia. Besides, I'm not sure that Istanbul has ever made the claim that it is the embodiment of the Olympic movement. Go figure.

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I thought this would happen:

Tokyo 2020 facing IOC Ethics Commission rap after Governor's comments about Istanbul

April 29 - Tokyo could face a reprimand from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Ethics Commission after the city's Governor appeared to contravene strict bidding rules by criticising Istanbul, a rival in the race to host the 2020 Olympics and Paralympics.

Naoki Inose was quoted in the New York Times this weekend appearing to claim that Istanbul is less developed and less equipped to host the Games than the Japanese capital.

"For the athletes, where will be the best place to be?" said Inose in the interview, conducted during a recent visit to New York, where he urged the city's Mayor Michael Bloomberg to support Tokyo's Olympic bid.

"Well, compare the two countries where they have yet to build infrastructure, very sophisticated facilities.

"So, from time to time, like Brazil [for Rio 2016], I think it's good to have a venue for the first time.

"But Islamic countries, the only thing they share in common is Allah and they are fighting with each other, and they have classes."

Government Ministers in Turkey, which is a secular nation, despite the large majority of its population being Muslim, are reportedly "surprised" at the comments of Inose, a renowned historian and social critic whose views have often proved controversial.

Inose also dismissed claims that Istanbul had an advantage over Tokyo because of Turkey's large young population, compared to Japan, whose is in comparison is relatively aging.

"I'm sure people in Turkey want to live long," said Inose.

"And if they want to live long, they should create a culture like what we have in Japan.

"There might be a lot of young people, but if they die young, it doesn't mean much."

The IOC are investigating Inose's comments and are expected to formally write to Tokyo 2020 today to seek an explanation about the interview, which appears to break rule 14 of the conduct for bidders, specifically designed to stop bid cities commenting on rival campaigns.

The interview was conducted by Ken Belson, a reporter on the New York Times who speaks Japanese and who, in 2011, was part of a team that was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for international reporting for their coverage of the tsunami and nuclear disaster in Japan.

Hiroko Tabuchi, a Japanese-born writer on the New York Times, was also present at the interview.

"Tokyo 2020 fully respects and adheres the IOC guidelines for the Candidate Cities," a spokesman for Tokyo 2020 told insidethegames.

"We have the utmost respect for the other cities bidding to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games, and consider them all friendly rivals under the sublime spirit of the Olympic values, excellence, respect and friendship.

"We are currently reviewing the matter."

Insidethegames

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Wow. If the outcome is negative for Tokyo come September, Inose is going to face some pretty scathing criticism as the person who possibly undid Tokyo's Olympic chances. Just goes to show how volatile these things can be. I'm sure Madrid and Istanbul are now scurrying to reaffirm PR policies - because honestly it could have been either one of these bids also.

In a bid race that is already extremely marginal between Istanbul and Tokyo - this could be the tipping point in the minds of many IOC members who are undecided - much like a politician slipping up in a tight election campaign.

Even if slightly, this will improve the chances of Istanbul, and to a lesser degree, Madrid. Which is sad, because if Istanbul wins 2020, which I think it should, I want it to win based on its own strengths and merits, and what it can give the Olympic movement, and not through the thoughtless, non-calculated error of a representative of another bid.

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