Jump to content

Rugby Sevens


Recommended Posts

Yes, but qualifying for the Olympic Games is supposed to be difficult for everyone, and there's always someone who could do well at the Olympics that doesn't manage to qualify. There are 19 rugby teams listed there, and all of them are really good, but some will just fail to qualify (up to 7 if it's a 12-team tournament). This happens in every other sport. For example, Argentina (men) and Germany (women) are two really good football teams that won't be competing in London. Same happens to Serbia (men), Spain (women) and Belarus (women) in basketball, not to mention that three among Russia, Spain, Japan, Ukraine, Italy and the USA will not qualify their synchronized swimming team, while weaker teams like Egypt or Australia have already qualified because of being the best from their continents... Continental qualification spreads the Olympics to every part of the world, but as a result, not all the best teams can compete.

Yea, its a tough balancing act. But rugby is unique. The smallest continent has the most high level nations in the sport. So how does the IRB and the IOC balance that? I personally think they will take the same approach as handball, water polo and volleyball. Having continental qualifying but with a large portion of spots determined at final qualification tournaments.

I persoanlly like the field hockey method. Have 5 continental representatives, the host and have 3 qualification tournaments of 4 teams where the top two at each tournament qualify for the Olympics.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 61
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Yes, but qualifying for the Olympic Games is supposed to be difficult for everyone, and there's always someone who could do well at the Olympics that doesn't manage to qualify. There are 19 rugby teams listed there, and all of them are really good, but some will just fail to qualify (up to 7 if it's a 12-team tournament). This happens in every other sport. For example, Argentina (men) and Germany (women) are two really good football teams that won't be competing in London. Same happens to Serbia (men), Spain (women) and Belarus (women) in basketball, not to mention that three among Russia, Spain, Japan, Ukraine, Italy and the USA will not qualify their synchronized swimming team, while weaker teams like Egypt or Australia have already qualified because of being the best from their continents... Continental qualification spreads the Olympics to every part of the world, but as a result, not all the best teams can compete.

Of course. And that's fair enough too. Just think that as one of the main arguments the IRB and many others put for 7s entering the games - that it would be a great opportunity for countries like the Pacific islanders of Fiji, Samoa and Tonga to shine - it would be a pity if none of them made it.

@Faster

I did come across a snippet yesterday that Africa apparently has two spots in the 2016 tournament (it was a report from Kenya that it fancies it's chances to qualify for the 2nd after Sth Africa). By that reckoning, it could well be two spots for each continent and maybe one or two other spots (depending if Nth and Sth America are counted together or separate).

Link to post
Share on other sites

I persoanlly like the field hockey method. Have 5 continental representatives, the host and have 3 qualification tournaments of 4 teams where the top two at each tournament qualify for the Olympics.

I agree. Since the IOC wants every continent to be represented at the Olympics, that's the best method, but it's not the method hockey uses (I think you meant handball).

Hockey gives 3 spots for Europe and 2 for Oceania (men), and 2 spots for Asia, 2 for Europe and 2 for Oceania (women). That means automatic qualification not only for the hosts, but also for Australia and New Zealand, while other teams have to fight much harder. I find that quite unfair :unsure:

I did come across a snippet yesterday that Africa apparently has two spots in the 2016 tournament (it was a report from Kenya that it fancies it's chances to qualify for the 2nd after Sth Africa). By that reckoning, it could well be two spots for each continent and maybe one or two other spots (depending if Nth and Sth America are counted together or separate).

If they're counted separate and they're both given two spots, that's it, there are already 12 teams. But I don't that would be the best option. Not all the continents have the same level, and even if they had, that would still leave the Pacific islanders out of the Games.

It's complicated. We'll see what IRB decides...

Link to post
Share on other sites

If they're counted separate and they're both given two spots, that's it, there are already 12 teams. But I don't that would be the best option. Not all the continents have the same level, and even if they had, that would still leave the Pacific islanders out of the Games.

It's complicated. We'll see what IRB decides...

Mind you, I suppose I took the arrogant attitude that Oz and NZ would be automatic Oceania qualifiers. In 7s, at least, the islanders would certainly give Oz a run for their money if I'm honest.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mind you, I suppose I took the arrogant attitude that Oz and NZ would be automatic Oceania qualifiers. In 7s, at least, the islanders would certainly give Oz a run for their money if I'm honest.

:lol: Well, I know nothing about rugby or 7s, so I don't really know if the 2 supposed Oceania qualifiers could really be Fiji and Tonga instead of Australia and New Zealand. Anyway, giving 2 spots for each of the 6 continents would mean the qualifying tournaments would be a do-or-die for all teams, as there would be no chance of an additional qualifier. It seems unlikely, although it would be pretty similar to the current football method.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Athens, field hockey does have the 3 final tournament qualifiers like handball. I got the final tournaments confused, because in field hockey only the winner qualifies, but in handball its top two.

The IRB considers the Americas as one (qualification for the world cup is as a whole for example). So the Pan American games would likely be the venue to qualify.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Athens, field hockey does have the 3 final tournament qualifiers like handball. I got the final tournaments confused, because in field hockey only the winner qualifies, but in handball its top two.

The IRB considers the Americas as one (qualification for the world cup is as a whole for example). So the Pan American games would likely be the venue to qualify.

Another sport for the 2015 Pan Am Games that can be used for qualification.

Apparently, Judo, Wrestling, Weightlifting, Basketball are being asked for the Pan Am Games to be their qualifciation tournament.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Another sport for the 2015 Pan Am Games that can be used for qualification.

Apparently, Judo, Wrestling, Weightlifting, Basketball are being asked for the Pan Am Games to be their qualifciation tournament.

I think you might be mistaken about judo. You might be thinking of taekwondo. Judo uses a ranking system. The top 22 (14 for women) judoka qualify and than the top 2 non-qualified judoka from each continent qualify. Unless that are thinking about going back to the extremely long and complicated process they used for 2008.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you might be mistaken about judo. You might be thinking of taekwondo. Judo uses a ranking system. The top 22 (14 for women) judoka qualify and than the top 2 non-qualified judoka from each continent qualify. Unless that are thinking about going back to the extremely long and complicated process they used for 2008.

I know, but they can gain qualification points towards the Olympics, which I believe was not the case during Guadalajara. Taekwondo could be another sport.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Athens, field hockey does have the 3 final tournament qualifiers like handball. I got the final tournaments confused, because in field hockey only the winner qualifies, but in handball its top two.

Yes, but there's a big difference between field hockey and handball. There aren't 5 continental representatives in hockey. There are 8. Europe and Oceania (and also Asia in the women's tournament) have more than one continental spot. Therefore, only 3 teams can qualify at the the final tournaments, while there are 6 handball teams qualifying this way.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

London to host stars of Women's Sevens

The International Rugby Board and Rugby Football Union have today announced that the London Sevens will play host to an IRB Women’s Sevens Challenge Cup event in May.

The showcase women’s event, featuring 12 invitational international teams, will follow in the footsteps of a successful tournament in Dubai last December and one scheduled for Hong Kong next month.

The IRB Women’s Sevens Challenge Cup will be played alongside the final round of the HSBC Sevens World Series at Twickenham on May 12-13 in front of what tournament organisers are hoping will be a record crowd for a Sevens event at the iconic venue.

The 12 teams invited by the IRB are: Sevens world champions Australia, hosts England, Dubai winners Canada, USA, the Netherlands, Rugby World Cup Sevens 2013 hosts Russia, Brazil, China, Kazakhstan, France, South Africa and Portugal.

http://www.irbsevens...s+womens+sevens

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

Great ad for the game:

New Hong Kong format a winner

I went to a rugby tournament the other day and a fairytale broke out.

I hope you saw it. You might not have as in New Zealand time the tournament's grand final was tucked away on your TV near midnight on Sunday night. But you should try and see it some time.

I'm talking about the three day annual Hong Kong sevens rugby tournament. It really was a magical event.

Funnily enough it didn't look like it was going to be that way. The venerable Hong Kong sevens has been a much-loved event since 1976 and its format of play has hardly ever changed. 24 men's international sevens teams converge on the city and they bash away at each other for three days and after much excitement created on the field of play, and much drinking done in the grandstands, one team goes home with the gleaming tournament trophy.

From that tradition Hong Kong has built up a history of being the best tournament on the annual International Rugby Board's world sevens series.

This time though the early portents weren't good. The IRB sevens tour officials had persuaded the Hong Kong people beforehand that their time-honoured format should be altered to be two separate ranking tournaments played alongside each other at the same time. The changes were asked for by the IRB so that they could use the tournament to find their top 15 nations in ranking order so that they (the IRB) could then send those 15 teams on their full and expanding world tour next season. And also send them, in the season's ahead, to the sport's climactic inclusion in the Olympic Games programme in 2016 in Rio de Janeiro.

Too complicated for you? Well the locals initially said so too. Mostly via several stern columns in the South China Morning Post's special first day supplement.

The local hacks railed against the new format, saying things along the lines of 'why change something that ain't broke.' At the same time regular tour writers said 'no, hold on, the new format is going to be worthy.'

Now that the smoke has drifted away from the fireworks of this year's final night's celebrations and from the advantage of hindsight the tournament can now be seen to have been simply magical as a sports event.

The main reasons for the new stimulation came from the many more 'contests with edge' that the new ranking system offered. In some of the games of earlier years there were usually some tiresome hidings dished out to 'minnow' countries by the 'hotshot' nations. When those games were played you could look away from the field if you wanted to. It wasn't pretty to see hapless teams getting thumped by 50 or 60 points. 'Let's go find a beer,' was the cry then.

Not this year.

This time nearly every game of the 61 over the three days had sharpness of intent built in. The countries of the second-tier immediately caught on to the need to fight tooth and nail in everygame to try to confirm their ranking inside the top 15.

Suddenly there were games with a 'grand final' appearance from every second game!

And when Canada, Spain and Portugal finished in the top three of the second tier competition their players hugged and embraced as if they had won the main Hong Kong trophy.

They hadn't of course, but what they had won was the right for IRB funding for their sevens selections processes next year plus the joining with the top 12 other countries with tickets to all ten tournaments in the most exotic of cities of the 2013 world tour. Great for them!

Other factors also built into the breathtaking weekend. The presence of an eight nation women's IRB Challenge Cup became an added delight. I felt, like at most polite social events, the tone was raised by having the women present. Their final, between England and Australia was a knock-'em-down thriller, and it went out on the live TV feed to the biggest ever global audience for sevens rugby.

The final was won by the British team in extra time by 15-10. That led to more huggin' and kissin' as the capacity crowd of 40,000 in the stadium roared their approval of what both teams had offered.

Soon though all the female efforts and tour ranking games were completed and New Zealand and Fiji came out to play the traditional tournament grand final.

What emotion this game offered. For a start you had to almost feel sorry for both teams as the players must have been exhausted from the rigors of just getting to meet in the climax. In the previous two days South Africa, England and Samoa in particular, had played with fierce resolve but had been eventually turned back, leaving the two best teams to fight it out.

I sensed something special was upcoming when the faces of three or four of the Fijian players contorted into tearful response to the playing of their national anthem - and that was beforethe kick off!

What followed was an unsurpassed world promotion of sevens rugby, quite the best seen in a long time; possibly since the halcyon days of the 1990s in Hong Kong's great Waisale Serevi and Eric Rush days.

Fiji won 35-28 with no less than nine tries scored by the two teams from the two ten minutes halves of play. That's one try every two minutes! The whole game was played at such a speed you could not be blamed for thinking all the players were fresh and relaxed. They could not have been.

The Fijians raced about in glorious combinations, throwing crazy passes which were miraculously all caught at top clip to be spectacularly finished with some of the best dives to score you will ever see. The New Zealanders never gave in and twice came back with pairs of tries of their own breath-taking quality.

The emotion of contest even ran so high at one point that it looked like an almighty punch up might have erupted. While common sense soon prevailed the grimaces and stern looks only added to the raucous excitement of the crowds. Even in a great match boys will be boys.

Quite simply I implore those of you who regularly hunker down to watch the 'crouch-touch-pause-and collapse' scrummaging debacles of modern 80-minute rugby to get to a replay of the Hong Kong sevens final. You will see skilled running and passing and commitment all done at the highest of speeds which in the 15-aside game is now more regularly blocked by grim defences and on-field crowding. The free-spirited running we saw in Hong Kong cannot, it seems, exist now in the 'main' long version of rugby.

The players seem to agree. From men and women we are now hearing more regularly the possibility of them bidding to win a place in their Olympic Games teams four years from now.

And more and more fans are seemingly climbing onto the sevens momentum too. Hong Kong was a sell-out of course and 64,000 had gone to the previous Las Vegas event. We also hear 50,000 tickets have already been sold for Twickenham in a month's time.

The fairytale Hong Kong final was played in such an electric atmosphere after three days of other superior build-up excitement that everything is adding to a born-again upward swing of a sport that still feels gloriously 'new.'

Quite simply, from what was seen in Hong Kong, sevens rugby is confirmed now to be on a new roll of excitement that not even the organizers of change could have envisaged.

TVNZ

Gotta say, I've always wanted to go to a HK 7s. I reckon it would be one of the great sports events.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...