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Well, the Evaluation Committee will see the situation with its own eyes. I just hope they appraise the situation as it is.

Well I'd imagine the same questions will be asked in relation to the traffic concerns...and after the 5th attempt...you would hope the Istanbul bid team would know what is expected and these upgrades have been as a result of the reviews from previous bids...

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OK, after having experienced Istanbul first hand, I have to say it is a fantastic and exciting city. They have some room for improvement, but given that the 2020 Games are 8 years away, those little i

Cross my fingers for Istanbul!!!

its out of topic but very important for istanbullers.. finally its spring and millions of tulips blossomed all around the city. this flower is so important n our culture even has a period name in Ott

All I can report on is what my parents just experienced. They loved Istanbul and have no reason to overstate the transportation problems.

Anywhere in the world rush hour is more than one hour. That is also the case in Istanbul where peak hours are three to four hours long in the morning and three to four hours long in the evening.

As for the Istanbul residents, it depends on who you are quoting. One said "without traffic" the commute is 20 minutes. I could say the same thing here in LA, but the only time the streets are really "without traffic" is 3:00 am. Istanbul will not be "without traffic" during the Olympics.

I am thankful for the participation of our Turkish members. I do not think they are lying. I do think they are trying to represent their city in the most positive terms -- as any of us would if our cities were in the race.

never saw a 3 our traffic in istanbul. mostly 1 / 1,30 hours. cant say anything else but its my past in istanbul roads. may be an accident on the road or st extraordinary may take more thn 1,30.

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I've said it before, but normal traffic patterns go out the window for a Games. People will be encouraged to take holidays, stagger working hours, telecommute, special lanes will be set up for Olympic traffic only, and spectators will be discouraged from taking anything but public transport. Every host always predicts and warns of traffic armageddon, and the end result is pretty quiet roads, even those that are notoriously gridlocked in normal operation.

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I've said it before, but normal traffic patterns go out the window for a Games. People will be encouraged to take holidays, stagger working hours, telecommute, special lanes will be set up for Olympic traffic only, and spectators will be discouraged from taking anything but public transport. Every host always predicts and warns of traffic armageddon, and the end result is pretty quiet roads, even those that are notoriously gridlocked in normal operation.

But if I remember correctly, you haven't seen Istanbul in motion (or lack thereof, as the case may be).

I really question the idea that all cities can be equally traffic-free during the Olympic Games.

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But if I remember correctly, you haven't seen Istanbul in motion (or lack thereof, as the case may be).

I really question the idea that all cities can be equally traffic-free during the Olympic Games.

No, I haven't seen Istanbul.

But Sydney's notoriously gridlocked on a normal working day (and getting worse all the time) and I'm sure I've heard the same complaints of London (I have been stuck in London gridlock, but not sure how normal that is). Both also get a lot of complaints about their public transport systems in normal times (I remember in the 2012 bid, how the Tube was counted as a "negative" for London). And yet in both cases, transport was a non-issue in terms of games-time problems - I was amazed how empty the streets were of traffic in Sydney in 2000 and London this year. Worst traffic I've ever seen is in Seoul - it literally did not move at times, and yet they've coped with a Games.

Apart from the Olympic "family" road lanes, nearly all Games planners try to restrict the use of cars, in favour of forcing spectators exclusively onto public transport.

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The only way they can zip the official Olympic parties thru the connecting avenues is to order NON-Olympic goers and non-emergency citizens to stay home or leave Istanbul for awhile. Even the so-called modern tram lines just inch their way around the narrow, crowded streets. That's why Istanbul has never been taken seriously in the past...and it's worse even now that the Games are much bigger.

Correction: the only way they can get athletes from the OV in the NW corner of the City to venues in the southern Asian side w/o much stress & hassle is to fly them in giant helicopter transports. That should really be it. Of course, that runs the risk of being shot down by possible terrorists. So, no. Istanbul is stuck between a rock and a hard place. They should really have Euro 2020 as their back-up. They knew that in their bones from the start.

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To be fair, I haven't seen Istanbul in person either. I'm relying on my parents account. However, they have lived in LA for decades and know NYC and London very well. They said they'd never seen anything like the congestion in Istanbul.

i think the time when they arrive here most probably the renovation time of bridges at bosphorus and golden horn. it was a nightmare and yes there was a hellish traffic that time. 3 lined bridges closed to 1 line in each way and dream about the traffic .... peah

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The only way they can zip the official Olympic parties thru the connecting avenues is to order NON-Olympic goers and non-emergency citizens to stay home or leave Istanbul for awhile. Even the so-called modern tram lines just inch their way around the narrow, crowded streets. That's why Istanbul has never been taken seriously in the past...and it's worse even now that the Games are much bigger.

Correction: the only way they can get athletes from the OV in the NW corner of the City to venues in the southern Asian side w/o much stress & hassle is to fly them in giant helicopter transports. That should really be it. Of course, that runs the risk of being shot down by possible terrorists. So, no. Istanbul is stuck between a rock and a hard place. They should really have Euro 2020 as their back-up. They knew that in their bones from the start.

transportation isnt a big deal here. believe me. just they can arrange a special road like they do for metrobus. and it leads from euro edge passing the olympic village to the asia close to asian olympic park.

also the marmaray starts from salacak ( 10 min. by walk from the village) to euro , connecting all metro lines and leads the airport and olympic park.

istanbul_metrobus_durak_haritasi.png

why u guys make it a big deal? i stuck in paris much more than istanbul several times. especially st dennis stadium road?

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To be fair, I haven't seen Istanbul in person either. I'm relying on my parents account. However, they have lived in LA for decades and know NYC and London very well. They said they'd never seen anything like the congestion in Istanbul.

I dont think you can compare Istanbul of 1984 to Istanbul of 2012. Turkey has changed a lot in the last 10 years, let alone nearly 30...Not just you but all of us should see the city for ourselves properly before we make a judgement on its traffic..during peak and non-peak hours

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No, I haven't seen Istanbul.

But Sydney's notoriously gridlocked on a normal working day (and getting worse all the time) and I'm sure I've heard the same complaints of London (I have been stuck in London gridlock, but not sure how normal that is). Both also get a lot of complaints about their public transport systems in normal times (I remember in the 2012 bid, how the Tube was counted as a "negative" for London). And yet in both cases, transport was a non-issue in terms of games-time problems - I was amazed how empty the streets were of traffic in Sydney in 2000 and London this year. Worst traffic I've ever seen is in Seoul - it literally did not move at times, and yet they've coped with a Games.

Apart from the Olympic "family" road lanes, nearly all Games planners try to restrict the use of cars, in favour of forcing spectators exclusively onto public transport.

Believe or not I've heard Istanbul's metro trains run more efficiently then Melbourne's...and from what I've heard about Sydney, the metro there isnt much better then Melbourne's.

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I dont think you can compare Istanbul of 1984 to Istanbul of 2012. Turkey has changed a lot in the last 10 years, let alone nearly 30...Not just you but all of us should see the city for ourselves properly before we make a judgement on its traffic..during peak and non-peak hours

I'm not sure what your point is. I haven't seen Istanbul at all. My parents were there in July of this year. They said the traffic was horrific all the time -- and they live in LA.

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this year summer time.... see the photos and get what i mean

istanbul-trafigi_92928-455x308.jpgtrafik-fsm.jpg

http://www.hurriyetd...D=238&nid=25324

the worst in istanbuls istory.. and badly u 2 guys witness this situation.

Better NOT show that when the Evaluation Commission comes visiting...otherwise, ball game ALL over. And I'm sure they've heard ot such problems; but seeing it in actuality would only confirm those fears. I'm sure Platini couldn't care less one way or another.

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uyf baron:) its most probably the first time ever in 2500 year Istanbul history:) and why is written in the article.. we need to renovate te first bridge asap too. tts why government pushing on for the 3 rd bridge and marmaray ...

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:blink: How come you're back?

Didn't you dramatically say goodbye a few months ago?? :blink:

New York has 2 rivers and a bay as well -- so how different is that from Istanbul??

Well .. !! I am dramatically BACK !!

And YOU KNOW THAT i HAVE AN AFFECTION FOR YOU HERE ON GB!!

SO Don't EN-COU-RAGE ME EACH TIME MILES.. will YAH !!

JEEEZZZZ ..

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I spent near two weeks in Istanbul - during summer - and never saw traffic like that. Sure, it is a big city with big needs, and suffered congestion, but nothing that you would not expect of a near-developed/westernised 10million+ city. I honestly thought Beijing was far more intense. At least Istanbul was never shrouded in smog like Beijing, there is a constant breeze.

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I dont think you can compare Istanbul of 1984 to Istanbul of 2012. Turkey has changed a lot in the last 10 years, let alone nearly 30...Not just you but all of us should see the city for ourselves properly before we make a judgement on its traffic..during peak and non-peak hours

Sorry I thought your parents visited Istanbul in 1984...My mistake.

I'm not sure what your point is. I haven't seen Istanbul at all. My parents were there in July of this year. They said the traffic was horrific all the time -- and they live in LA.

Sorry I thought your parents visited Istanbul in 1984...My mistake.

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I spent near two weeks in Istanbul - during summer - and never saw traffic like that. Sure, it is a big city with big needs, and suffered congestion, but nothing that you would not expect of a near-developed/westernised 10million+ city. I honestly thought Beijing was far more intense. At least Istanbul was never shrouded in smog like Beijing, there is a constant breeze.

Thats interesting seeing as though Beijing would probably be the best host city in terms of comparison..Although im also interested to know if Rio had such concerns, with its large population

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Obviously the topic of discussion here, its the topic of discussion in all the world's majors

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/5375c710-114c-11e2-8d5f-00144feabdc0.html#axzz29YUOGMZF

Obviously the topic of discussion here, its the topic of discussion in all the world's majors

http://www.ft.com/in...l#axzz29YUOGMZF

Transport: Infrastructure funding offers speedier route to recovery

By Shawn Donnan in Istanbul

City link: the Marmaray rail tunnel is due to be completed in 2013

When the team assessing the various cities bidding to host the 2020 Games presented their report to the International Olympic Committee in May, they offered a sober assessment of Istanbul’s transportation challenges.

“Significant transport infrastructure upgrades are planned,” the authors wrote. “Should these not be completed there is a risk of extended transport times for athletes travelling from the Olympic Village to the venues located around the city.”

IN Istanbul: Business & Finance 2012

Underlying that statement is an awkward reality for Istanbul: no matter what it has done over the years it has struggled to keep up with its own allure and the resulting growth.

The sprawling city has spent billions upgrading its transportation network to cope with a population that, since 1950, has grown from just over a million to more than 15m today. By 2020, according to some predictions, another two million people will call it home and there are those who expect it to grow to 25m within a decade or two.

But its congested roads and creaky transport infrastructure remain one of Istanbul’s weak points. Strike out for home at rush hour and you are confronted with six-lane arteries overwhelmed with cars and buses and taxi drivers who blanch at the idea of venturing into what they view as traffic black spots. The city’s metro stations heave with commuters, the unluckiest of which can face a three-hour trip home.

The city has ambitious plans to change all that. In May it awarded the $2.5bn contract to build a third bridge across the Bosphorus near the Black Sea to a Turkish-Italian consortium that has promised to complete construction by 2015. Designed to ease congestion by drawing heavy trucks away from Istanbul, it will also link up with a third airport for the city.

Further south, where the Bosphorus spills into the Sea of Marmara, construction is under way on two new tunnels linking the European and Asian sides of the city. The first of those, the Marmaray rail tunnel, is due to be completed in 2013 and will link up with the city’s two existing airports and the city centre. The second, the Eurasia Bosphorus road tunnel, is due to be completed by 2016.

Istanbul’s metro system is also expanding, with the first line on the Asian side opening this year and construction under way on a new bridge across the Golden Horn, the body of water that bisects the European side.

Those ambitions all combine to make Istanbul’s infrastructure investment programme one of the most aggressive in the world, experts say, and all of it is badly needed just to catch up with past population growth. Still, it is not without potential constraints or controversy.

According to Martin Spicer, manager of the International Finance Corporation’s southern Europe infrastructure programme, European banks are returning slowly to the local project finance market they have traditionally dominated after the eurozone crisis put any new business on hold.

But Turkey’s national ambitions – over the next three years the country is rolling out $10bn-$15bn in projects – also mean the market for financing “is difficult”, Mr Spicer says, “and will be a constraint to meeting this aspiration of building all this infrastructure”.

A number of Istanbul’s infrastructure projects have also drawn controversy. Critics of plans for the third bridge fear it will accelerate Istanbul’s sprawl towards the Black Sea, threaten a forest on the European side, and in the end do little to address the city’s traffic problems.

Like the two that came before it, says Cemal Gokce, president of the Istanbul branch of the Turkish Chamber of Civil Engineers, the third bridge will only serve to open up new areas to development. “It will draw more people from the rural areas and precipitate sprawl all the way to the Black Sea,” he says.

Drawing heavy trucks away from the centre of the city and the existing bridge will do little as they now account for only 2-3 per cent of the traffic on the bridges. Better, he says, would be a much more aggressive investment in public transportation.

To an untrained eye, with its air-conditioned carriages and clean stations, Istanbul’s Metro system appears remarkably efficient. But there are just 70km of line, Mr Gokce points out, compared to the 500km in a city like London, which has less than 60 per cent the population of Istanbul.

“Ninety per cent of this city’s transportation relies on roads [and] most of it is private cars. We have to give people some more choices,” he says.

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Sorry I thought your parents visited Istanbul in 1984...My mistake.

Sorry I thought your parents visited Istanbul in 1984...My mistake.

I figured that out belatedly. Sorry. My dad worked on the 84 Games. I think that's where things hot confused.

Typo. Read "got".

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