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Sean Goldman Case...how Can The Ioc


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Hey guys, based on Baron's logic the REAL question is: how can IOC give the SOG to a country that started an ILLEGAL war against every international organization based on FALSE ALLEGATIONS thus killing THOUSANDS OF INNOCENT PEOPLE just to get more oil?

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MR. CATA, BARON-PIERRE, EVERYONE ELSE

REALLY, SERIOUSLY,

STOP!!!!

This is a really ridiculous course of discussion regarding the election of the OLYMPICS

The Olympics

The sports festival most associated with mutual respect, cultural awareness, and peace?

YES, THOSE OLYMPICS.

We are here to discuss the 2016 OLYMPICS Host City campaign

We are not here to discuss our national histories and national embarrassments or

How our legal systems handle cases differently.

We should try to compete and discuss the bids with a mind towards mutual respect and cultural awareness.

Honestly - The United States is a large, influential country with a free press, lots of cameras, and lots of people with fast Internet access. We are a very easy place about which to find dirty laundry. And we know that. And everyone else knows that.

Our history for the past hundred years is known or could be known by just about anyone who is interested. We've made many mistakes - in the recent past, particularly between Jan 2001 and Jan 2009 - but we've also done a lot of good.

Fine - the U.S. hasn't always made the best decisions or been the most respectful nation. But, then, neither are bad judgment or bad decisions or difficult relationships with other nations a particularly American trait. Every country has their own events and decisions that they would rather not remember or have recalled or have displayed.

I'm certain even Brazil

I'm in no mood to post about Brazil or to illustrate anything about Brazil's background but that doesn't mean that I couldn't (if you've been reading my posts, it should be clear that I know how to find, interpret, and explain information about a lot of subjects).

But, really, though - EVERYONE - STOP!!!

We're trying to make amends and trying to do what is right and make sure that we do what is right going forward.

I see no reason to go on with this discussion.

PLEASE.

STOP!!!![/b]

CHItown '16

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See?

What changed? You should have 'screamed' stop' in a big font just when Baron started this thread and you posted on it.

Nothing changed.

As I said: this site is full of fanatics

I came here 100% against RIO2016 but Now I'm 50/50.

The fanatics here use everything they can find against another city. Its SAD,

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I actually support torture and whatever means necessary to get info! So there!!

American's Mentality right here:

Hey ioc members: if you're a Muslim you'll face problems in the airport just to enter the country and if somehow you're unlucky and an american like Baron don't like you because of your beard you'll probably be tortured.

Remember that.

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Oh dear.

I think baron regrets having started this pathetic thread!

Well done to all of you (MrCatra) who kicked him where it hurts.

More seriously, I find it downright disgusting that threads like this one should ever have been started in the first place.

It clearly shows that the financial stakes concerning OG are so high that any dirty tricks to get the games are fair...erm...game!

In 2005 the London bidders, with the help of the English gutter press, spread the rumour that Chirac had criticised English and Finnish cuisine.

The only problem was.....nobody had heard him saying so and nobody came forward to claim he had said anything of the sort.

But then it was too late and the 2 Finnish votes went to London....

We now learn that that a few days before the vote in Singapore the London bidding team targeted all 12 Muslim members of the IOC and showed them photos of Bertrand Delanoë (mayor of Paris and leader of the Paris 2012 bidding team, who happens to be gay and makes no secret about it) taking part in a gay rights demonstration......

This only goes to show that the bidding process is not only totally flawed but that it is totally corrupt.

It's time for a change and the sooner the better......

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Oh dear.

I think baron regrets having started this pathetic thread!

Well done to all of you (MrCatra) who kicked him where it hurts.

More seriously, I find it downright disgusting that threads like this one should ever have been started in the first place.

It clearly shows that the financial stakes concerning OG are so high that any dirty tricks to get the games are fair...erm...game!

In 2005 the London bidders, with the help of the English gutter press, spread the rumour that Chirac had criticised English and Finnish cuisine.

The only problem was.....nobody had heard him saying so and nobody came forward to claim he had said anything of the sort.

But then it was too late and the 2 Finnish votes went to London....

We now learn that that a few days before the vote in Singapore the London bidding team targeted all 12 Muslim members of the IOC and showed them photos of Bertrand Delanoë (mayor of Paris and leader of the Paris 2012 bidding team, who happens to be gay and makes no secret about it) taking part in a gay rights demonstration......

No guesses where their votes went to.

This only goes to show that the bidding process is not only totally flawed but that it is totally corrupt.

It's time for a change and the sooner the better......

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The Illegal and immoral war on Iraq by the numbers:

(numbers from one year ago)

Below Is a detailed list of Iraq "by the numbers" released by Senator Harry Reid's office:

The Cost to Iraqis and Journalists

8,000: Number of Iraqi military and police killed since June 2003. [brookings Institute, Iraq Index, March 13, 2008]

82,000-89,000: Estimate of Iraqi civilians casualties from violence since the beginning of the Iraq War. [iraq Body Count]

4.5 Million: Number of Iraqi refugees both inside and outside the country. [Washington Post, 3/17/08]

127: Number of journalists killed in Iraq since March 2003. [Committee to Protect Journalists]

Economic Costs of War in Iraq

$33.51: Cost of a barrel of oil in March 2003. [Energy Information Administration]

$105.68: Cost of a barrel of oil on March 17, 2008. [NYMEX] one of the most cruel indicators: thousands of people died everywhere around the world without nothing to eat because the oil price affects agriculture

U.S. Troops and Contractors in Iraq

132,000: Number of U.S. troops in Iraq in January 2007, before President Bush's escalation. [brookings Institution, Iraq Index, 3/13/08]

155,000: Number of U.S. troops currently in Iraq. [brookings Institution, Iraq Index, 3/13/08]

140,000: Number of U.S. troops projected to be in Iraq in July 2008. [Associated Press, 2/26/08]

35,000: Number of private security contractors operating in Iraq. [Human Rights First, Private Security Contractors at War]

180,000: Number of private contractors operating in Iraq. [Human Rights First, Private Security Contractors at War]

Progress Towards Political Reconciliation Made By Iraqis

3: Number out of 18 Bush Administration Benchmarks Met by Iraqi Government As of January 24, 2008.

18: Number of provinces President Bush said would be secured by Iraqis as of November 2007. [President Bush Speech, 1/10/07]

8: Number of provinces actually secured by Iraqis as of January 2008. [NPR, 1/7/08]

Bush-Republican Intransigence on Staying the Course in Iraq

8: Number of times a majority of the Senate has voted to change course in Iraq.

7: Number of times Bush Republicans in Congress have blocked changing course in Iraq.

1: Number of vetoes issued by the White House over changing course in Iraq.

The Cost to Our Forces in Iraq

3,990: American troops who have died in Iraq since the start of the war. [icasualties.org, 3/17/08]

29,395: Number of U.S. service members that have been wounded in hostile action since the start of U.S. military operations in Iraq. [AP, 3/11/08]

60,000: Number of troops that have been subjected to controversial stop-loss measures--meaning those who have completed service commitments but are forbidden to leave the military until their units return from war. [uS News and World Report, 2/25/08]

5: Number of times the 3rd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment has been sent to Iraq. They are the first Marine Corps unit to be sent to Iraq for a fifth time. [san Francisco Chronicle, 2/27/08]

2,100: Number of troops who tried to commit suicide or injure themselves increased from 350 in 2002 to 2,100 last year. [uS News and World Report, 2/25/08]

11.9: Percent of noncommissioned Army officers who reported mental health problems during their first Iraq tour [Los Angeles Times, 3/7/08]

27.2: Percent of noncommissioned Army officers who reported mental health problems during their third or fourth Iraq tour [Los Angeles Times, 3/7/08]

The Cost to Our Military Readiness

88: Percent of current and former U.S. military officers surveyed in a recent independent study who believe that the demands of the war in Iraq have "stretched the U.S. military dangerously thin" [Foreign Policy/Center for New American Security, 2/19/08]

94: Percent of Army recruits who had high school diplomas in Fiscal Year 2003 [Larry Korb, The Guardian, 10/12/07]

79: Percent of Army recruits who had high school diplomas in Fiscal Year 2007 [Larry Korb, The Guardian, 10/12/07]

4,644: Number of new Army recruits who were granted moral waivers in Fiscal Year 2003. [Houston Chronicle, 10/14/07]

12,057: Number of new Army recruits who were granted moral waivers in Fiscal Year 2007. [Houston Chronicle, 10/14/07]

67: Percent of captains the Army managed to retain this year, short of its goal of 80 percent, and in spite of cash bonus incentives of up to $35,000 [Armed Services Committee Hearing, 2/26/08]

The Cost to Our National Security

1,188: Number of global terrorist incidents from January - September 11th, 2001. [American Security Project, "Are We Winning?," September 2007]

5,188: Number of global terrorist incidents in from January- September 11th, 2006. [American Security Project, "Are We Winning?," September 2007]

30: Percent increase in violence in Afghanistan from 2006 to 2007. [Reuters, 10/15/07]

21: Number of suicide bombings in Afghanistan in 2001.

139: Number of suicide bombings in Afghanistan in 2006, with an additional increase of 69 percent as of November 2007.

30: Percent of Afghanistan controlled by the Afghan Government according to DNI Mike McConnell. [Associated Press, 2/27/08]

2,380: Days since September 11th, 2001 that Osama Bin Laden has been at-large.

The Cost of Funding the War in Iraq

$50-60 Billion: Bush Administration's pre-war estimates of the cost of the war. [New York Times, 12/31/02]

$12 Billion: Direct cost per month of the Iraq War. [Washington Post, Bilmes and Stiglitz Op-Ed, 3/9/08]

$526 Billion: Amount of money already appropriated by Congress for the War in Iraq. [CRS, 2/22/08]

$3 Trillion: Total estimated cost of the Iraq War. [Washington Post, Bilmes and Stiglitz Op-Ed, 3/9/08]

$5 Trillion - $7 Trillion: Total cost of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan accounting for continued military operations, growing debt and interest payments and continuing health care and counseling costs for veterans. [McClatchy, 2/27/08]

160: Percent that the cost of the Iraq War has increased from 2004 to 2008. [CRS Report, 2/22/08]

milosevic.jpg vs george-bush-middle-finger.jpg

Who was more cruel? Who killed more innocent people based on ignorance / hate?

Its a tuff question. But at least Slobodan was found dead in the prison he was.

Bush is on his ranch hunting some animals...

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This is sooooooooo 5 years ago.

Been there; done that. :rolleyes:

Sticks and stones will hurt my bones..

But names will never hurt me.

Personally, I don't care about all that Abu Ghraib sh*t. But aparently, McCatra, u're into all these naked prisoner bodies...but hey if you're into that thing..and apparently you keep records of those...then bully for you!! I bet you get off on those.

What make me laugh about you is that you're a guy from a third world country and acts like a redneck from texas.

Supporting torture and every atrocity bush committed makes you feel more American.

We are who we are. You can't fight against it. Not in this life.

Gl baron.

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blah...blah...blah.

Thanks for staying up all night to do this.

I had a good night's sleep.

:rolleyes:

LOL?

Its just copy/paste from google, dude. It doesn't take more than 5min each. (I have more 5 posts copied just waiting other to post so I can keep this thread on top LOL)

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3rd world? Obviously, it takes one to know one.

We're cut from the same piec of cloth sh*t head!

As I said I had a good night's sleep. I guess you had a bad one.

:lol::lol::lol::lol:

It really affects you, huh? hehe

A lot of atrocious things posted and the only thing that made baron react was when I mentioned his Heritage.

You're a sad person, baron.

And no my night was really good. I had 11 hours of sleep as usual hehe.

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In Brazil, a Wave of Corruption Cases

President, Seen as Architect of Cleanup, Retains Public Support Even as His Allies Fall

BRASILIA -- The paper trail ends in an unmarked office in Brazil's federal police headquarters, where duffel bags full of confiscated files are heaped on the floor, waiting to be opened and analyzed.

The bags have been piling up in recent months, byproducts of the sensationally brazen corruption scandals that have been multiplying, one after the other. The parade of disgraced public figures under investigation seems endless -- from government ministers to top lawmakers to members of President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva's family.

Meanwhile, Lula's reputation floats above the muck, rising with public opinion polls that indicate about two-thirds of Brazilians are happy with him. Close allies fall around him, but the president is protected by an increasingly popular belief: The contents of those duffel bags -- and all the dirty deals they have revealed -- might have remained unexamined if it weren't for Lula.

"People are not stupid -- they know corruption has always occurred in Brazil, and it's just that more of it is being uncovered now," said Jorge Hage, the government's auditor general. "For the first time in Brazilian history, we have a systematic effort to fight it."

Since Lula took office in 2003, the staffs of both the auditor general's office and the federal police -- the two agencies that have uncovered most of the scandals -- have grown by 50 percent.

Parts of the federal budgeting process have become more transparent, thanks in part to a Web site with detailed information about more than $1.5 trillion in federal contracts. Using such tools, Brazilians filed 6,214 allegations of wrongdoing last year, and the auditor's office analyzed 3,227 of them. A total of 1,224 government workers have been fired as a result of such investigations since 2003, according to the auditor general's office.

Some government critics have questioned whether the firings and shaming of public officials will make a lasting difference or simply allow different people to practice the same corruption. It's practically impossible to measure whether the increasing number of investigations is reducing the amount of corruption, but World Bank surveys show Brazilians don't think so: Most people perceive that there is more corruption in government now than there was 10 years ago, according to the bank's Governance 2007 report.

"I hear very frequently -- and it is said in a negative way about our work -- that it has been hard to find people now who want to accept a public job, especially one with budgetary responsibility," Hage said, sitting in front of a map covered with pushpins that mark each of the 1,223 municipalities his office has audited. "It has become a very high-risk job in Brazil."

The federal police have been leading the recent sting operations. Getulio Bezerra Santos, head of the federal police's organized crime unit, said his department now operates under a "capitalistic" reward system: The more corruption they uncover, the more resources they get. That creates incentives to target officials who control a lot of money, he said.

Bezerra Santos added that since Sept. 11, 2001, the amount of international pressure to fight terrorism has lessened the focus on drug-related crimes, freeing some police divisions to concentrate more on crimes against the public sector.

"Before, the police just went to the slums and kicked in doors, and now, we're taking panoramic elevators to air-conditioned offices," he said.

The high-profile scandals, each with a headline-ready nickname, have consistently dominated front pages in the past year. Examples include:

You want part 2

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U.N. watchdog denounces police killings in Brazil

Mon Sep 15, 2008 7:18pm EDT

SAO PAULO (Reuters) - Police frequently kill criminal suspects and ordinary citizens in Brazil, driving up the homicide rate in what is already one of the world's most violent countries, the United Nations said on Monday.

In a 49-page report, the U.N. Human Rights Council also concluded that a sizable portion of the Brazilian population in high-crime areas supports extrajudicial killings and vigilante justice in the absence of an efficient criminal justice system.

While police killings are commonplace all across the South American country, the problem is most pronounced in the tourist mecca of Rio de Janeiro, according to Philip Alston, the U.N.'s special rapporteur on unlawful killings, who visited Brazil at the invitation of the government.

"In Rio de Janeiro, the police kill three people every day. They are responsible for one out of every five killings," Alston said in the report, which was based on a 10-day fact-finding mission to Brazil last November.

The report found that on-duty police officers using deadly force are only part of the problem. A large number of off-duty officers routinely moonlight as members of death squads and take part in other forms of organized crime, it said.

The report singled out the proliferation of so-called militias as especially worrisome. These groups, mostly made up of off-duty and retired police officers, originated as private security providers in Rio's violent slums but evolved into extortion rackets that frequently mete out summary justice.

"A remarkable number of police lead double lives," Alston said. "While on duty, they fight the drug gangs, but on their days off, they work as foot soldiers of organized crime."

Another hot spot for police violence is the northeastern state of Pernambuco, where Alston estimated that 70 percent of all homicides are committed by death squads made up of off-duty and retired officers.

The report identified a handful of factors that may drive police to take part in organized crime, such as poor salaries and a shift structure with long hours that is followed by several consecutive days off.

But the most important factor contributing to police killings may be Brazil's shabby criminal justice system, which seldom achieves convictions even in ordinary murder cases. The report found that, in Sao Paulo, only 10 percent of homicides ever go to trial.

Alston also offered some recommendations on how to reduce police violence. They included higher salaries for police, better forensics, an improved witness protection program and a series of measures aimed at holding officers accountable for unlawful behavior and the use of excessive force.

(Reporting by Todd Benson; Editing by Cynthia Osterman)

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In Brazil, a Wave of Corruption Cases

President, Seen as Architect of Cleanup, Retains Public Support Even as His Allies Fall

BRASILIA -- The paper trail ends in an unmarked office in Brazil's federal police headquarters, where duffel bags full of confiscated files are heaped on the floor, waiting to be opened and analyzed.

The bags have been piling up in recent months, byproducts of the sensationally brazen corruption scandals that have been multiplying, one after the other. The parade of disgraced public figures under investigation seems endless -- from government ministers to top lawmakers to members of President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva's family.

Meanwhile, Lula's reputation floats above the muck, rising with public opinion polls that indicate about two-thirds of Brazilians are happy with him. Close allies fall around him, but the president is protected by an increasingly popular belief: The contents of those duffel bags -- and all the dirty deals they have revealed -- might have remained unexamined if it weren't for Lula.

"People are not stupid -- they know corruption has always occurred in Brazil, and it's just that more of it is being uncovered now," said Jorge Hage, the government's auditor general. "For the first time in Brazilian history, we have a systematic effort to fight it."

Since Lula took office in 2003, the staffs of both the auditor general's office and the federal police -- the two agencies that have uncovered most of the scandals -- have grown by 50 percent.

Parts of the federal budgeting process have become more transparent, thanks in part to a Web site with detailed information about more than $1.5 trillion in federal contracts. Using such tools, Brazilians filed 6,214 allegations of wrongdoing last year, and the auditor's office analyzed 3,227 of them. A total of 1,224 government workers have been fired as a result of such investigations since 2003, according to the auditor general's office.

Some government critics have questioned whether the firings and shaming of public officials will make a lasting difference or simply allow different people to practice the same corruption. It's practically impossible to measure whether the increasing number of investigations is reducing the amount of corruption, but World Bank surveys show Brazilians don't think so: Most people perceive that there is more corruption in government now than there was 10 years ago, according to the bank's Governance 2007 report.

"I hear very frequently -- and it is said in a negative way about our work -- that it has been hard to find people now who want to accept a public job, especially one with budgetary responsibility," Hage said, sitting in front of a map covered with pushpins that mark each of the 1,223 municipalities his office has audited. "It has become a very high-risk job in Brazil."

The federal police have been leading the recent sting operations. Getulio Bezerra Santos, head of the federal police's organized crime unit, said his department now operates under a "capitalistic" reward system: The more corruption they uncover, the more resources they get. That creates incentives to target officials who control a lot of money, he said.

Bezerra Santos added that since Sept. 11, 2001, the amount of international pressure to fight terrorism has lessened the focus on drug-related crimes, freeing some police divisions to concentrate more on crimes against the public sector.

"Before, the police just went to the slums and kicked in doors, and now, we're taking panoramic elevators to air-conditioned offices," he said.

The high-profile scandals, each with a headline-ready nickname, have consistently dominated front pages in the past year. Examples include:

You want part 2

hahahahaha, really? is that your response?

Wanna any help?

Brazil have its internal problems but we don't go to other countrys and kill thousands of children

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In Brazil, a Wave of Corruption Cases

President, Seen as Architect of Cleanup, Retains Public Support Even as His Allies Fall

BRASILIA -- The paper trail ends in an unmarked office in Brazil's federal police headquarters, where duffel bags full of confiscated files are heaped on the floor, waiting to be opened and analyzed.

The bags have been piling up in recent months, byproducts of the sensationally brazen corruption scandals that have been multiplying, one after the other. The parade of disgraced public figures under investigation seems endless -- from government ministers to top lawmakers to members of President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva's family.

Meanwhile, Lula's reputation floats above the muck, rising with public opinion polls that indicate about two-thirds of Brazilians are happy with him. Close allies fall around him, but the president is protected by an increasingly popular belief: The contents of those duffel bags -- and all the dirty deals they have revealed -- might have remained unexamined if it weren't for Lula.

"People are not stupid -- they know corruption has always occurred in Brazil, and it's just that more of it is being uncovered now," said Jorge Hage, the government's auditor general. "For the first time in Brazilian history, we have a systematic effort to fight it."

Since Lula took office in 2003, the staffs of both the auditor general's office and the federal police -- the two agencies that have uncovered most of the scandals -- have grown by 50 percent.

Parts of the federal budgeting process have become more transparent, thanks in part to a Web site with detailed information about more than $1.5 trillion in federal contracts. Using such tools, Brazilians filed 6,214 allegations of wrongdoing last year, and the auditor's office analyzed 3,227 of them. A total of 1,224 government workers have been fired as a result of such investigations since 2003, according to the auditor general's office.

Some government critics have questioned whether the firings and shaming of public officials will make a lasting difference or simply allow different people to practice the same corruption. It's practically impossible to measure whether the increasing number of investigations is reducing the amount of corruption, but World Bank surveys show Brazilians don't think so: Most people perceive that there is more corruption in government now than there was 10 years ago, according to the bank's Governance 2007 report.

"I hear very frequently -- and it is said in a negative way about our work -- that it has been hard to find people now who want to accept a public job, especially one with budgetary responsibility," Hage said, sitting in front of a map covered with pushpins that mark each of the 1,223 municipalities his office has audited. "It has become a very high-risk job in Brazil."

The federal police have been leading the recent sting operations. Getulio Bezerra Santos, head of the federal police's organized crime unit, said his department now operates under a "capitalistic" reward system: The more corruption they uncover, the more resources they get. That creates incentives to target officials who control a lot of money, he said.

Bezerra Santos added that since Sept. 11, 2001, the amount of international pressure to fight terrorism has lessened the focus on drug-related crimes, freeing some police divisions to concentrate more on crimes against the public sector.

"Before, the police just went to the slums and kicked in doors, and now, we're taking panoramic elevators to air-conditioned offices," he said.

The high-profile scandals, each with a headline-ready nickname, have consistently dominated front pages in the past year. Examples include:

You want part 2

xx

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U.N. watchdog denounces police killings in Brazil

Mon Sep 15, 2008 7:18pm EDT

SAO PAULO (Reuters) - Police frequently kill criminal suspects and ordinary citizens in Brazil, driving up the homicide rate in what is already one of the world's most violent countries, the United Nations said on Monday.

In a 49-page report, the U.N. Human Rights Council also concluded that a sizable portion of the Brazilian population in high-crime areas supports extrajudicial killings and vigilante justice in the absence of an efficient criminal justice system.

While police killings are commonplace all across the South American country, the problem is most pronounced in the tourist mecca of Rio de Janeiro, according to Philip Alston, the U.N.'s special rapporteur on unlawful killings, who visited Brazil at the invitation of the government.

"In Rio de Janeiro, the police kill three people every day. They are responsible for one out of every five killings," Alston said in the report, which was based on a 10-day fact-finding mission to Brazil last November.

The report found that on-duty police officers using deadly force are only part of the problem. A large number of off-duty officers routinely moonlight as members of death squads and take part in other forms of organized crime, it said.

The report singled out the proliferation of so-called militias as especially worrisome. These groups, mostly made up of off-duty and retired police officers, originated as private security providers in Rio's violent slums but evolved into extortion rackets that frequently mete out summary justice.

"A remarkable number of police lead double lives," Alston said. "While on duty, they fight the drug gangs, but on their days off, they work as foot soldiers of organized crime."

Another hot spot for police violence is the northeastern state of Pernambuco, where Alston estimated that 70 percent of all homicides are committed by death squads made up of off-duty and retired officers.

The report identified a handful of factors that may drive police to take part in organized crime, such as poor salaries and a shift structure with long hours that is followed by several consecutive days off.

But the most important factor contributing to police killings may be Brazil's shabby criminal justice system, which seldom achieves convictions even in ordinary murder cases. The report found that, in Sao Paulo, only 10 percent of homicides ever go to trial.

Alston also offered some recommendations on how to reduce police violence. They included higher salaries for police, better forensics, an improved witness protection program and a series of measures aimed at holding officers accountable for unlawful behavior and the use of excessive force.

(Reporting by Todd Benson; Editing by Cynthia Osterman)

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Brazilian police 'execute thousands'

By Angus Stickler

BBC News, Rio de Janeiro

Hundreds, possibly thousands of people are shot by police every year in Brazil, a BBC investigation has found.

The authorities say it is mainly criminals caught in military-style raids on drug gangs but according to a former senior official, new evidence suggests that many of the shootings are cold-blooded executions conducted by the police.

Former police ombudsman Professor Julita Lemgruber has told BBC World Service's Assignment programme that, in the state of Rio alone, the police killed 983 people last year. The figure is similar for Sao Paulo.

"The federal government should be challenging the various state governments in Brazil about the hundreds of people that the police kill in this country," she says.

Victims

As a former ombudsman, Professor Lemgruber was responsible for investigating the police as part of a previous crack down on corruption.

In the past five years, the number of fatal police shootings has more than doubled. Based on her experience as a government official, Professor Lemgruber says she believes the police are free to act with impunity.

“ It's all premeditated - very cold-blooded and calculated ”

Former military policeman

"You couldn't really investigate complaints because you knew there was this curtain of silence that was always present," she says.

She adds that she had personally dealt with cases in which summary executions had happened.

The authorities in Rio dismiss these allegations. They say most people killed by the police are criminals, shot in military-style raids.

But in the spring of this year events took a sinister turn when, on 31 March, two men entered a bar and started shooting, not once or twice, but again and again. Most of the victims were shot at close range - in the chest and in the head.

In all, 29 people were shot dead, apparently not by members of a criminal drug gang - but by off-duty police officers.

Executions

A former military policeman, Gordinho (not his real name), says executions by police death squads are common.

"Everyone knows the police here in Rio de Janeiro... nearly all of them abuse their authority," he says.

"When you get excited you feel you are the law... The shooting cases you hear about, most of them are executions.

"It's all premeditated - very cold-blooded and calculated."

After the killings in March, Marcello Itagebah, Secretary of State for Public Security and the man ultimately responsible for policing in Rio, promised to take a "meat cleaver" to police corruption. Following the investigation, 11 police officers were arrested.

"That shows to the people that we can conduct a very good investigation and that we can arrest police officers that committed crime," he said.

"We already have arrested more than 500 police officers, and we have expelled about 200 since last February. That is a job that has to be done every day."

But executions by death squads appear to be a traditional feature of Rio policing. While the authorities no longer give them official backing, evidence from the city morgues suggests they continue.

"Around 60% of the bodies of people that were killed by the police had more than six shots," explains Professor Lemgruber.

"Most of them [were shot] in the head and in the back - mostly executions."

Brazil is a deeply religious nation. Leaders of the Catholic Church have spoken out against corruption in politics and in the police force.

And among the congregations in the favelas, there is growing anger. They are determined to fight for change.

"You see children playing in the streets, and the people all happy - but when the cops come here - pop pop pop - some people are killed," says one resident, Paolo Cesar.

"They kill everybody. They got bad cops - bad cops."

Another resident insists that "we are fighting really hard for justice because the guilty people have to pay".

The crucial test now for Brazil's politicians is whether they have the will and ability to overturn a longstanding and lethal police culture of justice by bullet.

Story from BBC NEWS:

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Brazilian police 'execute thousands'

By Angus Stickler

BBC News, Rio de Janeiro

Hundreds, possibly thousands of people are shot by police every year in Brazil, a BBC investigation has found.

The authorities say it is mainly criminals caught in military-style raids on drug gangs but according to a former senior official, new evidence suggests that many of the shootings are cold-blooded executions conducted by the police.

Former police ombudsman Professor Julita Lemgruber has told BBC World Service's Assignment programme that, in the state of Rio alone, the police killed 983 people last year. The figure is similar for Sao Paulo.

"The federal government should be challenging the various state governments in Brazil about the hundreds of people that the police kill in this country," she says.

Victims

As a former ombudsman, Professor Lemgruber was responsible for investigating the police as part of a previous crack down on corruption.

In the past five years, the number of fatal police shootings has more than doubled. Based on her experience as a government official, Professor Lemgruber says she believes the police are free to act with impunity.

“ It's all premeditated - very cold-blooded and calculated ”

Former military policeman

"You couldn't really investigate complaints because you knew there was this curtain of silence that was always present," she says.

She adds that she had personally dealt with cases in which summary executions had happened.

The authorities in Rio dismiss these allegations. They say most people killed by the police are criminals, shot in military-style raids.

But in the spring of this year events took a sinister turn when, on 31 March, two men entered a bar and started shooting, not once or twice, but again and again. Most of the victims were shot at close range - in the chest and in the head.

In all, 29 people were shot dead, apparently not by members of a criminal drug gang - but by off-duty police officers.

Executions

A former military policeman, Gordinho (not his real name), says executions by police death squads are common.

"Everyone knows the police here in Rio de Janeiro... nearly all of them abuse their authority," he says.

"When you get excited you feel you are the law... The shooting cases you hear about, most of them are executions.

"It's all premeditated - very cold-blooded and calculated."

After the killings in March, Marcello Itagebah, Secretary of State for Public Security and the man ultimately responsible for policing in Rio, promised to take a "meat cleaver" to police corruption. Following the investigation, 11 police officers were arrested.

"That shows to the people that we can conduct a very good investigation and that we can arrest police officers that committed crime," he said.

"We already have arrested more than 500 police officers, and we have expelled about 200 since last February. That is a job that has to be done every day."

But executions by death squads appear to be a traditional feature of Rio policing. While the authorities no longer give them official backing, evidence from the city morgues suggests they continue.

"Around 60% of the bodies of people that were killed by the police had more than six shots," explains Professor Lemgruber.

"Most of them [were shot] in the head and in the back - mostly executions."

Brazil is a deeply religious nation. Leaders of the Catholic Church have spoken out against corruption in politics and in the police force.

And among the congregations in the favelas, there is growing anger. They are determined to fight for change.

"You see children playing in the streets, and the people all happy - but when the cops come here - pop pop pop - some people are killed," says one resident, Paolo Cesar.

"They kill everybody. They got bad cops - bad cops."

Another resident insists that "we are fighting really hard for justice because the guilty people have to pay".

The crucial test now for Brazil's politicians is whether they have the will and ability to overturn a longstanding and lethal police culture of justice by bullet.

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