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FIFA World Cup in Australia....When?


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Australia looked at bidding for 2010 - they got full state support, but no federal support.  There were also very early plans to host 1994.

I doubt Aust will bid until 2022 at the earliest.  With 2010 in Sth Africa, 2014 dedicated to Sth America and 2018 probably going back to Europe, it will be 2022 before this part of the world gets a look in.  I doubt FIFA will dedicate a WC to the Ocenia region, so it may end up being Australia bidding against other Asian hosts - China, etc.

As for which cities could host WC matches, Sydney has 3 40,000+ stadiums, Melbourne has 2, Adelaide has one, Perth has 1, Brisbane has 2.  Canberra, Adelaide, Melbourne and Perth could upgrade existing stadiums to be 40,000 capacity.

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Australia looked at bidding for 2010 - they got full state support, but no federal support.  There were also very early plans to host 1994.

I doubt Aust will bid until 2022 at the earliest.  With 2010 in Sth Africa, 2014 dedicated to Sth America and 2018 probably going back to Europe, it will be 2022 before this part of the world gets a look in.  I doubt FIFA will dedicate a WC to the Ocenia region, so it may end up being Australia bidding against other Asian hosts - China, etc.

As for which cities could host WC matches, Sydney has 3 40,000+ stadiums, Melbourne has 2, Adelaide has one, Perth has 1, Brisbane has 2.  Canberra, Adelaide, Melbourne and Perth could upgrade existing stadiums to be 40,000 capacity.

FIFA stabbed Australia and Oceana in the back when it gave its support to Germany 2006 instead of South Africa and then didn't give Oceana its own place to qualify for the world Cup Finals.

I really doubt that with no Oceana country in the World Cup in many years that FIFA will give it a chance to host one. :verysad:

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Ah, but you're forgetting one thing _ Australia is no longer part of the Oceania Confederation _ it left to join up with the Asian Confederation earlier this year (which will take effect after the 2006 WC).

That means that when it comes to Asia's rotation turn again, Australia will almost certainly be up against China _ that would be a tough battle but I'd imagine it would be hard for FIFA to pass up the lure of the Chinese market. Australia would probably have to wait until the rotation after that (and hopefully make a few more WC final appearances in the meantime).

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But do you think that Australia could pull the crowds? The average turn out to an A-League match so far is only 7,000 spectators.

Domestically the A- League hasn't even really started, in that so far only WCC qualifiers in Australia were held. Come the start of the A-league later this year hopefully crowds will be up.

And let's not forget the crowds at the last two knock-out qualifying rounds for the Socceroos, against Iran for 98 and Uruguay for 2002. 85,000 turned up at the MCG for the Iran game, and similar numbers returned for the Uruguay game. When Australia has a significant match or tournament with top flight opposition, then there are big crowds ready to come out. And the World Cup has been a ratings winner on Australian TV since at least 1990.

As for hosting a future World Cup, here's what current FFA boss John O'Neill said:

Australia 2018: O'Neill bids long hello to World Cup coup

By Michael Cockerill

June 3, 2005

 

Australia will bid to host the 2007 FIFA Congress and use it as a launching pad for a future World Cup bid.

Despite the imminent move to Asia, Football Federation Australia remains optimistic it can mount a convincing argument to host the 2018 World Cup under the new FIFA rotation system, and wants to use the 2007 congress to begin the lobbying process.

"I think we have the credentials, and that's why we're so keen to have the congress," said FFA chief executive John O'Neill. "You've got 500 or 600 people at a congress - all the decision-makers of world football - and it's the right place to start our World Cup pitch."

Two years ago FIFA announced it would rotate future world cups by confederation. Europe (Germany 2006) and Africa (South Africa 2010) have already been rewarded, while South America is due to stage the 2014 World Cup, with Brazil virtually confirmed as host nation.

That leaves 2018 as the next available opportunity, and with Asia (Japan/Korea 2002) and North/Central America (USA 1994) having hosted the tournament relatively recently, Oceania's claims for the 2018 tournament are, in theory, strong.

But Australia is the only Oceania nation capable of staging the tournament alone, and is poised to switch to Asia at the end of the year. O'Neill does not believe that means the door is closed. "I'm not as educated as others about the rotation system, but it is my impression that the 2018 World Cup will be available to Asia-Pacific, rather than simply Oceania," O'Neill said. "Anyway, who knows what the status of the OFC [Oceania Football Confederation]will be by then? I believe staging the World Cup in 2018 is a real possibility for us, and strange as it might sound coming from me, we could even stage some of the group games in New Zealand.

"The thing about the World Cup is that we have had every state government in the country expressing an interest in it. Right across the nation, event corporations, Ministers, government officials have indicated a willingness to get together and make this happen.

"We have the stadia, which obviously we would need to upgrade, and we have the expertise from things like the Olympics and the Rugby World Cup. I've got no doubt Australia would be a fantastic host of the World Cup."

FFA's ambitions do not stop there. Over the next 12 months it intends to start the bidding process for both the 2010 Women's World Cup and the 2011 Asian Cup. FFA is also looking at staging a mini-tournament in September 2007 as an addendum to the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Leaders' Meeting which is being held in Sydney at the same time.

Football is the national sport in most APEC countries, and it is believed that Prime Minister John Howard supports the concept of a tournament being played in parallel with the meeting

If 2018 is the next option, either for an Asian or Oceania bid, then Australia has every chance (perhaps combined with NZ). There could be stadia like the Telstra Dome and MCG in Melbourne, Lang Park in Brisbane, Telstra Stadium and Aussie Stadium in Sydney, Football Park in Adelaide, Subiaco or the WACA for Perth and Bruce Stadium in Canberra used as venues, and of course with relatively recent experience with the Sydney 2000 Olympics, 2003 Rugby World Champs and 2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne, Australia would have the big sporting event experience.

I say...go for it Aussie! And here's hoping the Socceroos exceed expectations tomorrow morning local time when we take on Germany in Frankfurt (first time since the 74 World Cup..ahhh, I remember it well!)

soc-australia1973.jpg

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With the way it is going to me, I think it will be a Europe-South America World Cup "rotation" before the likes of Australia and the like gets its chance to host one.
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Australia won't co-host with NZ, for starters it doesn't need to as we have all the stadia required, secondly we aren't even in the same confederation anymore and thirdly, as hosts automatically qualify for the cup the Europeans won't look too kindly on another "minnow" taking one of their spots.

Australia will bid for 2022 but will most likely lose to China. So sometime in the 2040's, though by that time we'll probably have some new stadiums and old ones will need to be upgraded.

For say 2006 the stadia would be;

Sydney - Olympic Stadium (83,000), Aussie Stadium (41,000)

Melbourne - MCG (100,000), Telstra Dome (53,000)

Brisbane - Lang Park (53,000), Gabba (42,000)

Adelaide - AAMI Stadium (55,000)

Perth - Subiaco Oval (43,000)

Canberra - Bruce Stadium (25,000 upgrade to 40,000)

Newcastle - Energy Australia Stadium (28,000 upgrade to 40,000)

Townsville - Dairy Farmers Stadium (20,000 upgrade to 40,000)

Gold Coast - Robina Stadium (25,000 upgrade to 40,000)

12 stadiums.

For 2040 the stadia could look more like:

Sydney - Olympic & Aussie & Western Sydney Stadium

Melbourne - MCG & Telstra Dome & new rectangular stadium

Brisbane - Olympic Stadium & Lang Park & Gabba

Adelaide - AAMI Stadium - upgrade 70,000.

Perth - Subiaco upgrade to 65,000 & ME Stadium upgrade to 40,000.

Gold Coast - Robina Stadium 45,000.

Townville - Dairy Farmers 40,000.

Newcastle - Energy Australia Stadium 45,000

Canberra - Bruce Stadium - 40,000.

Darwin - Marrara Oval - 40,000.

17 stadiums.

FYI the A-League starts in August.

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But do you think that Australia could pull the crowds? The average turn out to an A-League match so far is only 7,000 spectators.

If it's a blue riband event like the WC, the crowds will come out in force. The interest and enthusiasm in Oz for the 2002 WC in Japan-Korea was amazing, helped so much that for the first time the tournament was in our time zone.

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And after this morning's great game against Germany (4-3 loss was still a positive result, considering Ballack's penalty goal was given on a bit of a dive, and the Socceroos could have fielded several better players), I'm sure that a few FIFA heads have been turned by Aussie football. I saw Die Kaiser looking particularly glum, and Sepp Blatter must have pondered his reneging on the deal to give Australia...um, Oceania, direct entry into 2006.

3016740166.jpg

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:) I agree with many that Australia would have a better chance hosting between the 20's and 40's.  They will sole host as NZ simply lacks the stadia (even by then)and enthusium for the event.
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Well, it's official now. Blatter and the Asian Foortball Confederation president Mohamed bin Hammam announced yesterday that Australia would be competing in the AFC confederation from 2006.
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Australia will have to put in place a team bigger and better that the one that won Olympics 2000.

One month of absolute mayhem is what the WC is about, and thats just the English fans!!  Still it will be soooooooo worth it.

By the By IMO it's a good thing that Australia has moved to the Asian FC as this will allow stronger representation of the Pacific region, also with NZ staying in Oceania, a better chance inthe future for both countrys to qualify will be had.

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