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Cape Town 2010


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I suppose I'm a bit, meh, about the stadium itself. Not ugly, it does have a certain charm, but not iconic in its own right. It's setting, though, is simply spectacular!

I think the Cape Town Stadium is one of the most beautiful new stadiums I've seen lately. I mean the simple and clean beauty is the force of this Stadium.

I hate the Bird's Nest of Beijing due to it's heavy structure of metal. For me it's really ugly though it suited well to that polluted, gray air of Beijing.

C.T. Stadium instead seems to float above the sea, so light and white. I love it!

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Couldn't agree more lehari. Although saying that, the photos after which Rols responded weren't the best; I can kind of see his point of view looking at the two pics above his post.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Cape Town is giving the IBC in Johannesburg a run for its money.

BBC have already confirmed their glass studios as a broadcast base in Cape Town.

Another project will be the V&A Waterfront Media and Legacy Centre for broadcasters:

V&A Waterfront World Media & Legacy Centre · February 18th, 2010

Silence on the film-watching front, mainly because I’ve been flat out on developing a Media and Legacy Centre for Africa’s biggest visitor drawcard – the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town.

Green-Point-Stadium.jpg

Just a hop and a skip from the brand new Cape Town Stadium, the media centre will be offering a one-stop shop for premium media services, including:

  • Press Conference venues and dedicated interview rooms
  • Broadcast facilities including studios
  • Dedicated camera positions throughout the V&A and at prime locations across Cape Town
  • A media centre with hot desks, telephone lines, storage lockers, photocopy / fax etc.
  • Video Production services
  • Photographic Production services
  • A/V and Photo Camera Rentals
  • A/V and Photo Camera Repair
  • A/V and Photographic Consumables & Equipment
  • Photography Library
  • Video Library
  • Music Library
  • Tourism services including flight bookings, accommodation, tours and transfers
  • Concierge services
  • Office Space for temporary Corporate HQs
  • Conference and Meeting Rooms

We launch officially on March 1st, so I’ll have a purpose built website and centre registration details for you then. Phew.

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Cape reveals plans for 2010 transport network By Staff Writer

The City of Cape Town has unveiled its public transport plan to accommodate World Cup tourists and locals during the football tournament.

The plan envisages trains, buses, minibus taxis and metered taxis ferrying tourists to and from the airport, the Cape Town stadium and public viewing areas, and on an inner-city loop.

On match days, fans holding World Cup tickets will be able to travel to and from the stadium for free from more than 25 park-and-ride centres across the city, from as far afield as Strand.

Transport will be provided on other routes at regular intervals until late into the night throughout the tournament, from June 11 until July 11.

The city's public transport plan is to have at its centre main transport hubs on Hertzog Boulevard, adjacent to the Civic Centre, and Cape Town station.

A free shuttle bus for match ticket holders is to run from Hertzog Boulevard to the stadium. The service is to begin six hours before kick-off and continue until four hours after the final whistle.

On match days only, an Atlantic seaboard bus service is to run from Hout Bay through Camps Bay and Sea Point from four hours before kick-off until 2am. Prices are to be based on distance travelled.

For 24 hours a day throughout the tournament, a shuttle bus will ferry tourists from the Cape Town International Airport to the Hertzog Boulevard hub and back. With a fee of R50 for a one-way trip, the shuttles are to leave every six to 30 minutes, depending on demand.

Also running 24 hours a day - and leaving every 10 to 30 minutes - is to be a bus service, costing R8 a trip, on an inner-city route.

The buses are to travel from the Hertzog hub along DF Malan, Table Bay Boulevard, Heerengracht, Coen Steytler, Long and Loop, Buitensingel, Orange, Buitenkant, Darling, Oswald Pirow and back to Hertzog Boulevard.

The aim of the inner-city route is to give good access to city hotels and other accommodation, as well as restaurants, bars and parking areas.

Another shuttle route on which buses are to run until 2am throughout the event is to take tourists from the main hub to Queens Beach, Sea Point, by way of the V&A Waterfront.

It is intended that the Metrorail trains will be the backbone of public transport servicing the broader Cape Town area, particularly the public viewing areas at the Bellville Velodrome, Athlone Civic Centre, OR Tambo Sports Hall in Khayelitsha, and Swartklip Sport Hall in Mitchells Plain.

Twenty-five stations are to function as park-and-ride centres, as are UCT, Kronendal Primary in Hout Bay, and Camps Bay High School.

These are to provide more than 7 000 parking bays with security.

The main park-and-ride stations are Fish Hoek, Retreat, Claremont, Century City, GrandWest Casino, Oostersee, Brackenfell, Kuils River and Strand.

According to the plan, no general spectator parking is to be available at the stadium, while parking in the city centre will be severely limited.

Wheelchair users will be accommodated from the airport to the stadium and Hertzog hub. Shuttle stations are to be wheelchair-friendly.

City officials have urged people to see www.capetown.gov.za or call 0800 656 463 for more information.

  • This article was originally published on page 7 of The Cape Times on February 26, 2010

Published on the Web by IOL on 2010-02-26 07:25:00

© 1999 - 2010 Independent Online. All rights strictly reserved.

Independent Online is a wholly owned subsidiary of Independent News & Media. Reliance on the information this site contains is at your own risk.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Fan Walk: Cape Town Central Station to Cape Town stadium

2.5km pedestrianized route

2010 Fan Walk takes shape

The 2010 FIFA Football World Cup Fan Walk in Cape Town is taking shape. This is the route that creates a pedestrian-priority route from the CT Station in the CBD to the CT Stadium to be used by an estimated 18 000 fans on match days.

My 2010 colleague Carola Koblitz briefs CTP and CCID staff members at the start of our recent Fan Walk inspection tour (corner St George's Mall and Waterkant St)

IMG_0318.JPGUp the hill to Long Street. Waterkant (Waterside) Street, the main route of the Fan Walk in the CBD, marks near where the historical shoreline used to be. The whole of Waterkant street is being transformed into a pedestrian-priority route and cycle lane

IMG_0321.JPGSea Street is another reminder of where the shoreline used to be before the reclamation of the foreshore after 1939

IMG_0322.JPGGreening the city. In future years, the Fan Walk will be a shaded avenue

IMG_0337.JPGImprovements to public space often prompt the upgrade of adjacent buildings. Here, a new design-related development on Waterkant Street behind the historic Lutheran Church takes shape

IMG_0328.JPGA new pedestrian bridge under construction, corner Buitengracht and Waterkant St

IMG_0329.JPGOne of the busiest roads in the Central City is Buitengracht Street, which forms a hostile barrier for pedestrians between the CBD and Green Point. A new pedestrian bridge will begin to soften the interface between these two areas. There will also be a new at-grade pedestrian crossing

IMG_0331.JPGThe Fan Walk passes the Prestwich Memorial in St Andrew's Square, which pays tribute to the thousands of poor Capetonians, many of them slaves, who were buried over the years in unmarked graves outside the historical city boundary (buiten die Buitengracht - outside the Outer Canal). The new Truth coffee shop provides a welcome respite along the route

IMG_0336.JPGThe other half of the new pedestrian bridge under construction, against a backdrop of the old Lutheran Church and Table Mountain

IMG_0338.JPGThe old tram rails show where the trams coming from Sea Point and Green Point used to turn towards town along Waterkant Street

IMG_0339.JPG

The Fan Walk continues past the historic St Andrew's Church into Somerset Road, Green Point

IMG_0340.JPGSomerset Road is at the moment a jumble and clutter of traffic, in places very pedestrian unfriendly. The Fan Walk upgrade is an attempt to allocate addition space to pedestrians and cyclists through this busy area

IMG_0341.JPGThe Fan Walk passes by the popular Cape Quarter extension

IMG_0347.JPGThe Gallows Hill (another reminder of our conflict-ridden past) Traffic Department parking lot being converted into a temporary access road onto the Western Boulevard as part of the 2010 transport plan

IMG_0346.JPGFor sale. Another example of how the upgrade of public space can prompt potential private development

IMG_0345.JPGThe pedestrian and cycle route along Green Point Main Road is now well established, although concrete benches have been placed in awkward places, causing a potential hazard to a crowd of pedestrians and to cyclists

IMG_0358.JPGThe new Green Point Circle pedestrian underpass links the Fan Walk to the IRT station, the Waterfront, the CT Stadium and the Green Point Urban Park

IMG_0356.JPGLooking back. The Fan Walk provides a pleasant 2,6km (approximetely 30 minutes) walk from the CBD to the Stadium, and will become a means of accessing the stadium over and above the bus shuttle systems that will be provided on match days. It will also contibute to the 2010 legacy in the form of permanent cycling and pedestrian-priority routes through the city, which will no doubt lead to ongoing intensification of urban economic activities

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  • 2 weeks later...

logo.gif

Cape Town reveals plans for 2010 transport network

The City of Cape Town has unveiled its public transport plan to accommodate World Cup tourists and locals during the football tournament.

The plan envisages trains, buses, minibus taxis and metered taxis ferrying tourists to and from the airport, the Cape Town stadium and public viewing areas, and on an inner-city loop.

On match days, fans holding World Cup tickets will be able to travel to and from the stadium for free from more than 25 park-and-ride centres across the city, from as far afield as Strand.

4445323537_2b059fe31d_o.jpg

Transport will be provided on other routes at regular intervals until late into the night throughout the tournament, from June 11 until July 11.

The city's public transport plan is to have at its centre main transport hubs on Hertzog Boulevard, adjacent to the Civic Centre, and Cape Town station.

IRT_14_dec_09_f.jpg3896939302_2dcae3183b_o.jpg

A free shuttle bus for match ticket holders is to run from Hertzog Boulevard to the stadium. The service is to begin six hours before kick-off and continue until four hours after the final whistle.

4446095130_e3e63312c5_o.jpg

4445329925_62e173d6cb_b.jpg

On match days only, an Atlantic seaboard bus service is to run from Hout Bay through Camps Bay and Sea Point from four hours before kick-off until 2am. Prices are to be based on distance travelled.

4445323911_5829752b02_o.jpg

For 24 hours a day throughout the tournament, a shuttle bus will ferry tourists from the Cape Town International Airport to the Hertzog Boulevard hub and back. With a fee of R50 for a one-way trip, the shuttles are to leave every six to 30 minutes, depending on demand.

4445321933_b596a907d9_o.jpg

4441370992_b9c7b47b9c_o.jpg

Also running 24 hours a day - and leaving every 10 to 30 minutes - is to be a bus service, costing R8 a trip, on an inner-city route.

4445324485_13d5bfa944_o.jpg

The buses are to travel from the Hertzog hub along DF Malan, Table Bay Boulevard, Heerengracht, Coen Steytler, Long and Loop, Buitensingel, Orange, Buitenkant, Darling, Oswald Pirow and back to Hertzog Boulevard.

The aim of the inner-city route is to give good access to city hotels and other accommodation, as well as restaurants, bars and parking areas.

Another shuttle route on which buses are to run until 2am throughout the event is to take tourists from the main hub to Queens Beach, Sea Point, by way of the V&A Waterfront.

4445324201_399e4dedd1_o.jpg

It is intended that the Metrorail trains will be the backbone of public transport servicing the broader Cape Town area, particularly the public viewing areas at the Bellville Velodrome, Athlone Civic Centre, OR Tambo Sports Hall in Khayelitsha, and Swartklip Sport Hall in Mitchells Plain.

Twenty-five stations are to function as park-and-ride centres, as are UCT, Kronendal Primary in Hout Bay, and Camps Bay High School.

These are to provide more than 7 000 parking bays with security.

The main park-and-ride stations are Fish Hoek, Retreat, Claremont, Century City, GrandWest Casino, Oostersee, Brackenfell, Kuils River and Strand.

4446096910_d27e5be653_o.jpg

4445322775_1d3f708682_o.jpg

4446095912_dfec6284af_o.jpg

According to the plan, no general spectator parking is to be available at the stadium, while parking in the city centre will be severely limited.

Wheelchair users will be accommodated from the airport to the stadium and Hertzog hub. Shuttle stations are to be wheelchair-friendly.

City officials have urged people to see www.capetown.gov.za or call 0800 656 463 for more information.

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New pedestrian bridge in place over Lower Buitengracht

After almost two years of planning, a new pedestrian bridge was lowered into place over Lower Buitengracht in the Cape Town Central City yesterday. For many years, pedestrians walking between the V&A Waterfront and the CBD have had to take their life into their hands in trying to get across six lanes of fast moving traffic decending from the Foreshore Freeway into Lower Buitengracht. The City of Cape Town has used the preparations for the 2010 FIFA Football World Cup to improve pedestrian and cycle lanes in the city. Soon, dock workers and tourists alike will be able to avoid a potential death trap by using the new bridge. It will also open up a second pedestrian route to the CT Stadium via the V&A Waterfront.

IMG_6344.JPGThe bridge spans the incoming lanes of Lower Buitengracht. Access is via North Wharf Square between the Holiday Inn and the Cullinan Hotel

IMG_6338.JPGWorkers secure the sections of the bridge in place. The whole span was manufacturing off-site and lowered into place with a giant crane

IMG_6278.JPGThe bridge slopes down onto the wide centre island - part of the road reserve for when the Foreshore Freeway was originally planned to continue all the way up Buitengracht to Wale St

IMG_6262.JPGThe base of the bridge next to the outgoing lanes in Lower Buitengracht

IMG_6281.JPGPedestrians will still have to across the outgoing portion of Lower Buitengracht at grade (grownd level). The pedestrian bridge does not span the whole of Lower Buitengracht as this would make it difficult to complete the unfinished portion of the Foreshore Freeway, a plan still theoretically on the table

IMG_6265.JPGThe central island has been nicely landscaped, with an additional pedestrian route connecting to Hans Strydom Rd

IMG_6339.JPGVisitors to the Westin Grand Hotel and the CTICC will also benefit from improved pedestrian access

Pedestrians using the new bridge will get a good view of Cape Town's monument to the era of the concrete highway.

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  • 4 weeks later...

That Granger Bay Traffic Circle is an urban planning disaster. NO ONE is going to hang out inside that circle, NO shops are going survive under there. It will NOT be pleasant. **** like that just doesn't work. And that kind of a design is soooo mid century, and that stuff NEVER worked out. It's going to become a dark, dirty place, where no businesses will survive and no one will congregate, and will probably attract crime and vandalism. Whoever designed that, what the hell where they thinking?

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1. The BRT station exits directly into the circle, so its acts as an entrance and egress to the station

2. Its a move-through circle, not a congregation area i.e. from the Fan Walk, spectators do NOT have to dodge cars.

3. It is not large enough for more than 1 or 2 stalls and is unlikely to be a "business spot" given how small it is.

Perhaps a few markets, but even then, its a "move-through" not a congregation area.

The circle was only designed for pedestrian access to the stadium. It could have

1. been built at ground level with an even worse option i.e. spectators in a subway under the circle towards the stadium.

2. had cars move under with spectators on top, which would be less convenient for those in wheelchairs

3. no pedestrian access with spectators dodging cars

FRE_Feb_b.jpg

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