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Walter Cronkite Dies At 92


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Although he certainly reached a proud age, it's very sad that he's gone. He was a journalistic role model -- his seriousness, sincerity and humbleness are qualities which are too rarely found in today's journalism. This moment (starting at 5:00) was truly symbolic for his human qualities, although he later said that it was the only time he almost lost his composure while on air:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2K8Q3cqGs7I...feature=related

The most amazing thing was: Walter Cronkite was so convincingly trustworthy that he worked his charms immediately. I remember that I first saw him in 1998 on CNN as commentator on John Glenn's second launch into space and I was impressed by his style right away.

Farewell, Walter. You'll be truly missed.

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The Kennedy announcement will always go down as one of those, well, memorable moments of emotion mixed with a world shattering event. Sad to see one of the great icons of journalism depart.

RIP

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I've just finished reading Cronkite's obituary (today's Independent) and was struck by this passage that illustrated just what a hold he must have had over the American public:

With his coverage of the war in Vietnam, Cronkite may have changed history. He had grown increasingly sceptical about President Johnson's repeated assertions that America was winning the war, and in 1968 went to see for himself. His verdict was that the conflict had become a bloody stalemate and victory was not on the cards. The only rational way out, he declared, "will be to negotiate, not as victors, but as an honourable people who lived up to their pledge to defend democracy, and did the best they could."

Cronkite was Johnson's favourite newsman, and on hearing that judgement, the President turned to his aides and said, "It's all over." Cronkite, he knew, had more authority with the American people than any other broadcaster, and if Cronkite thought that the war was hopeless the American people would think so too. A few weeks later Johnson announced an end to the air and naval bombardment of most of Vietnam and that he would not seek another term. David Halberstam, the American media watcher, commented, "It was the first time in history that a war had been declared over by an anchorman."

I doubt that any newsman today could wield such power over public opinion! B)

RIP Walter

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituari...le-1753042.html

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I'm surprised that there are only two answers in this thread -- and that they come from people from countries outside the US.

I'm surprised and I'm not, if that makes sense. Walter Cronkite is more of an icon for older people in the US, I think. Myself, I don't remember him being on TV too much, being that when I was growing up, my family regularly watched the ABC evening news (Walter Cronkite was on CBS). And, Cronkite retired in 1981 (the year I turned 11 years old) so many young people today wouldn't really be familiar with him except for maybe hearing of him in history lessons or whatever.

He was able to retire at 65 and enjoy the rest of his long retirement. RIP Walter Cronkite.

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