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Opening Ceremony


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1. You may not, but Ceremony organisers certainly do when they're looking for ideas.

2. @baron-pierreIV [re Almeria's OC towers]: "No clip of the 2005 ceremony has appeared on YouTube"

shows why they were made of gauze- they were actually very tall costumes!

@JMarkSNow:

1. I am aware of that. That's their job.

2. Great find. I guess I didn't look under Spanish titles. Looks like a great show, except I don't understand the allusion to Hollywood movies.

Re the cylindrical costumes...OK, that clears that up. So it brings us back to the Vegas show, Love!, developed by Cirque du Soleil and which I posted a few weeks earlier re the first genesis of the rising chimneys/smokestacks effects of a professional show on a large scale. Thanks for finding the clip.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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It looks more like several structural rings are positioned along
the shaft to provide shape, and the fabric hangs taunt from ring to ring as the
chimney is hoisted up with rigging. But I guess there could also be some
inflation going on, I think it would be redundant however and would require an enormous
amount of air pressure to fill quickly…I just don’t think they were inflated. I
could be wrong; I’d love to see more technical details of the prop if anyone
really has them.

My favorite props at London

1.Iron flow effect to main ring (favorite moment)

2.Tor -how can anyone not liek the Tor, so cute and furry!

3.glowing rings -looked like hot iron! great effect

4.Chimneys (loved the finish/brick patterns on these!)

500.Text bubbles :blink:

Olympic-Pandemonium_Olympics_London-1024

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I don't think there was any inflation involved because: (1) too complicated to construct; and (2) these things had to be packed & squished when not in use and having some sort of inflated compartments there would hinder the quick takedown of said structures.* The globe in Beijing strung out to 24m high when fully stretched; and still measured 4.5m high when it was pancaked and parked. But it had those steel plates on which the gymnasts pranced around; and which is why they also dug a 25-foot deep pit to hold all the underground stuff.

*(I cud ask my LOCOG contact, Daniel, who worked on the texture of these; but he doesn't always answer my emails. It's a hit or miss thing; but I'll try.)

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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I don't think there was any inflation involved because: (1) too complicated to construct; and (2) these things had to be packed & squished when not in use and having some sort of inflated compartments there would hinder the quick takedown of said structures.

I'm probably going to look like a right idiot, but you're now going to tell me & everyone else that you're an expert in the inflatables business and that of their use in the entertainment industry and obviously right on top of latest developments in this field.

I'm impressed.

Unless of course, you're not.

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FGS, Rob. I'm not involved in some lengthy discourse with him. I just sought to confirm something about the foto and the info he posted. I don't think the "composed that foto" just to troll on SSC. C'mon, give me a little more credit. I can tell a destructive troll from a harmless one.

Sorry, didn't mean that post to come across as condescending as it did rereading it. I wrote it in a rush and the guy's just been getting on my tits.

:unsure:

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I'm probably going to look like a right idiot, but you're now going to tell me & everyone else that you're an expert in the inflatables business and that of their use in the entertainment industry and obviously right on top of latest developments in this field.

I'm impressed.

Unless of course, you're not.

Well, u said it; not me. Yeah, so how's about we compromise -- they were part (or some were) part inflatables and/or just hoisted by the cables & counterweights?? ;)

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From The Engineer, 23 August 2012
"With the grass removed, the stadium was transformed into a representation of industrial Britain led by Victorian engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel (played by Kenneth Branagh), complete with beam engines, textile looms and seven chimneys reaching up to 30m in height that appeared to rise from underneath the stadium. Although the chimneys were very solid in appearance and each weighed more than one tonne, they were, in fact, inflatable and were filled by fans beneath the stage. Each chimney was rolled via tracks onto a lift in the stage floor and then hooked onto the cable-net system above the stadium. ‘As they’re inflated they’re actually pulled up by the aerial system at the same time as the lift is co-ordinated, so when the chimneys are fully elevated the lift is flat with the finished floor level of the stage construction,’ explained flying technical manager James Lee. A winch with a slip clutch attached to the top of the chimneys and pneumatic dampeners at their bases kept them taught, ensuring they inflated from the top and securing the illusion that they were solid structures rising from the floor."

Remember, one of the aims of this show was to celebrate British technical ingenuity!

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Well, if they had fans for the chimneys, how come there was so much pollution in the early Industrial Revolution days when those smokestax went up? SUrely the fans would've blown away all the soot, huh? :lol:



PS: @baron-pierreIV [re the Almeria 2005 OC]: "I don't understand the allusion to Hollywood movies. "

Almeria is a famous location for "American" films, notably Sergio Leone's "Dollars" movies

Ah. That makes sense. I thought a lot of the Sergio Leone "Dollar" movies were shot in Italy.

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@baron-pierreIV: "Well, if they had fans for the chimneys, how come there was so much pollution in the early Industrial Revolution days when those smokestax went up? SUrely the fans would've blown away all the soot, huh?"

To demonstrate the remarkable effect of the fans at full throttle, I can only refer you, again, to that moment in Yellow Submarine (keep watching to see where all the soot settles, and to hear a pretty good song):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wxKoGrFmik

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@baron-pierreIV: "Well, if they had fans for the chimneys, how come there was so much pollution in the early Industrial Revolution days when those smokestax went up? SUrely the fans would've blown away all the soot, huh?"

To demonstrate the remarkable effect of the fans at full throttle, I can only refer you, again, to that moment in Yellow Submarine (keep watching to see where all the soot settles, and to hear a pretty good song):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wxKoGrFmik

Mark (& Volshy), I was messin' with your heads re my comment on the smokestax and the "fans." Don't take everything I post too seriously! As I said, I come here for a lot of fun...not all seriousity!! ;)

Here's the latest from my LOCOG source: Inflammation was also involved according to my best knowledge! (Source is not a native English speaker.)

So, yes, those were apparently infected smokestacks, so there was swelling and inflammation involved. Why didn't they show the inflamed smokestacks being lanced for pus?? I mean, Dr. Alexander Fleming after all, was British...so showing a "bleeding" of pus (and the introduction of penicillin) from the smokestacks would've been another salute to a great pioneer of British science!! :lol:

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Aha! Once again, baron-pierreIV, you have indirectly helped my analysis of the London opening. I now wonder if the Bob Haro-inspired aerial dove was meant to be seen by UK viewers as being partly a Vic and Bob reference.

Vic - and Bob :blink: ...another, obscure British reference you dropped out of the clear blue sky and expect everyone else to pick up?? :blink:

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Aha! Once again, baron-pierreIV, you have indirectly helped my analysis of the London opening. I now wonder if the Bob Haro-inspired aerial dove was meant to be seen by UK viewers as being partly a Vic and Bob reference.

Stretching things a bit there I reckon :lol: :lol:

It's quite funny that some try to decipher the "secret language" of the opening ceremony. As far as meanings are concerned, London was a really shallow OC, at least for non-british viewers...

Speak for yourself, like the rest of us are. It shows an insecurity of your own opinion that you need to couch it in such language.

Edited by RobH
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@LOUIS: "As far as meanings are concerned, London was a really shallow OC, at least for non-british viewers... "

I think you'll find quite a few viewers in China, at least, found it far from shallow. And any Olympic OC which christens one of its major segments "There is a Light That Never Goes Out" needs to be examined pretty dam' closely ...


[Nicely-chosen clip there, RobH ! ]

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Vic - and Bob :blink: ...another, obscure British reference you dropped out of the clear blue sky and expect everyone else to pick up?? :blink:

there is a new quite obscure web site called 'google.com' where you can research obscure British references :-S

It's quite funny that some try to decipher the "secret language" of the opening ceremony. As far as meanings are concerned, London was a really shallow OC, at least for non-british viewers...

it might look shallow but it's actually deeper than you think like that road scene in vicar of dibley. and as far as shallow OC, beijing takes the cake on that.

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there is a new quite obscure web site called 'google.com' where you can research obscure British references :-S

If I have to search for it...nothing doing. For that, u gotta pay me. Other ceremonies don't put on these obscure references and then assume that people will have to go on a hunt for them. If that was Danny Boyle's mantra, then indeed he failed. DON'T make your viewers work for it. That's why many foreign viewers were left scratching their heads. You make your message easy for an international audience. These "obscure" references only lead to misinterpretations as in pretentious "art" movies. . A sports event ceremony shouldn't be one of those (not unless you are Dmitris Papioannou) .

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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ti as far as shallow OC, beijing takes the cake on that.

Why should a ceremony have to be "...deep"? Where does it say that in the IOC Charter?. A Ceremony is something celebratory and merely a precursor to the main event, it should not be a PhD candidate's test. Beijing did its best to explain the 4 contributions the Chinese felt they made to human civilization -- and even if it missed in that regard, I never heard ANYONE saw that these images were puny, unimpressive or that they had seen before. All they had to be were impressive and awe-inspiring. I don't see why it had to be shallow or deep. It is merely ENTERTAINMENT...not an Oxford entrance exam.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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@illustrado: "as far as shallow OC, beijing takes the cake on that."

@baron-pierreIV: "Other ceremonies don't put on these obscure references and then assume that people will have to go on a hunt for them."

Both half-right there, I think. Beijing was meant to look shallow but spectacular to anybody unfamiliar with Chinese culture: "Give 'em the Four Great Inventions and the greatest mass-movement exercises the're ever likely to see; oh, and a modest firework display would be nice." But a Chinese audience probably paid little attention to the mass-movement etc. and focused instead on little details, particularly within the central performance area, which most Westerners ignored.

In keeping with its general policy of inverting Beijing's approach, London deliberately highlighted the little details- although you didn't need to interpret them to get the basic thread of the three main musical stories. In many cases, because British culture continues to be exported all over the world, viewers in some pretty surprising places would pick up on the references- for example, identifying Rowan Atkinson as Mr Bean the instant they saw his face, or singing along to "Satisfaction" (just not live on air please, Meredith). Bear in mind too that the London opening was intended partly as a tribute to Shakespeare, one of the all-time great creators of entertainments designed to work on multiple levels.

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If I have to search for it...nothing doing. For that, u gotta pay me. Other ceremonies don't put on these obscure references and then assume that people will have to go on a hunt for them. If that was Danny Boyle's mantra, then indeed he failed. DON'T make your viewers work for it. That's why many foreign viewers were left scratching their heads. You make your message easy for an international audience. These "obscure" references only lead to misinterpretations as in pretentious "art" movies. . A sports event ceremony shouldn't be one of those (not unless you are Dmitris Papioannou) .

never underestimate the international audience. saying that OC needs to just be people dancing in unison and a few firework is an insult to the viewing public. sports events like this is the closest thing for a host nation to showcase their culture,beliefs and tradition on this scale to a global audience. watering it down would neither benefit the host country or the IA

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