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Africa 2016?


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Hmmm. The old "new frontiers" argument may end up being the sleeper issue for 2016. Just found this about a new group setting up to push for an African games in 2016.

GENEVA, Jan 19 (AFP) - A group of European and African executives and sports officials on Thursday launched a campaign to bring the Olympic Games to Africa in 2016.

Vowing not favour a single country or bid, the founders of the NewSporAfrica foundation said they wanted to generate support inside Africa and in wealthy nations for bids by African countries.

``It will never be partisan by taking sides for one country,'' said Jean-Pierre Sirot, a former French industrialist who is the driving force behind the foundation.

The president of Cameroon's Olympic Committee, Hamad Kalkaba Malboum, who is supporting the move, said that after 116 years the modern Olympic movement should give Africa its turn to host the Games.

``There are five rings, one can't settle for four of them,'' he said, referring to the emblem of the Olympic movement which represents the five continents.

``What we regard as an injustice must be repaired,'' he told AFP at the launch, underlining that it would be just a return for decades of medal-winning performances by African athletes and teams.

No African country has ever hosted an Olympics, one of the costliest public events in modern times.

Only four nations outside Europe and North America -- Australia, Japan, South Korea and China -- have ever won a bid for the Games.

The Geneva-based foundation, which was presented to diplomats and businesspeople from about 50 countries, said the venture had encouragement or support from other sports officials and at International Olympic Committee headquarters.

The foundation hopes to build on the growing trend to give each continent their turn to host major events, typified by South Africa's winning bid to host football's World Cup in 2010.

However, that emerged after a concerted effort by world football governing body FIFA to limit bidding to African candidates. Malboum said there was a need for a similar ``will'' in the Olympic movement.

``That kind of logic has not yet reached the IOC,'' he added.

IOC president Jacques Rogge has been trying to rein in the size and cost of the summer Olympics, and has encouraged bids from other continents.

Kenya's sports minister Ochilo Ayacko pledged during a visit by Rogge one year ago to mount a bid to host the 2016 Olympic Games in the country.

The South African city of Cape Town, finished third in the race for the  2004 Olympics, while the Egyptian capital, Cairo, was an initial candidate for the 2008 Games.

AFP

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The way I could see it panning out is an African city or two (a laughable Nairobi bid or a more serious South African bid) throwing their hat in for 2016, but inevitably losing out to one of the biggies _ the US or Japan.

This causes a bit of an outcry, however, a la Sth Africa's losing bid for WC 2006 or Japan's losing Rugby WC 2011 bid, and the groundswell builds for Africa to get a "turn" in 2020. By the time of the vote for 2020, WC 2010 will have happened and depending on its success or not the pressure builds to a point where it would be hard for the IOC NOT to award a new frontier bidder for 2020.

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The only trouble for a Cape Town bid -- and of course, it will be the most eligible bid in the Continent, is that (1) it will have had some glory in 2010; and (2) it's from a nation that's not completely 'African.'  So Cape Town might not enjoy 100% support of the continent.

Yeah, I've read the odd mention that the rest of Africa weren't exactly happt that South Africa seemed to be hogging the big events limelight. I think that's a big reason South Africa dropped out from any 2014 Commonwealth Games bid _ to let the others have a go and curry favour for its own bigger ambitions.

It was probably a no lose proposition for it _ if it had gone for the 2014 CWGs and won, it certainly would have set back any Olympic hopes. But now, if Nigeria wins it's given the black Africans a crumb to be happy with, and if Nigeria loses the Southies can come out and point to the fact that they're the only ones up to it.

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just a few of my thoughts

1. no other country besides south africa is able to host the games in future even by 2016.

2. nairobi, cairo, mozambique, morroco...no chance...

3. the IOC will make the strategic move when they are ready

4. cape town 2020! or 2016

5. this topic is a bit over analyzed..only time will give us answers we need

6. any argument about cape town or south africa wanting to host everything????? deal with it!...if u wanna host the big events u have to host the smaller ones and prepare urself...

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I won't even go into the Nairobi issue _ I've gone over it so many times in so many threads _ but I'll just repeat again that Nairobi just can't physically host a games as it is at present.

I agree with you Mo on your last point _ yeah, South Africa may have grabbed the lion's share of events Africa has hosted, but let's be honest _ who else could do it?

And as you said, it's building up very valuable experience and working its way up gradually and sensibly to the ultimate prize _ an Olympics. The gradual way has always been the stated plan for South Afgrica, and far more sensible a way of doing it than trying to land an Olympics out of the blue with no experience, expertise or infrastructure a la Kenya.

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Why not Cairo 2016?

I mean they bid for 2008 and although that they weren't selected for the shortlist - they are able to make a better proposal this yime. And also Egypt is one of the richest countries in the African continent!

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Why not Cairo 2016?

I mean they bid for 2008 and although that they weren't selected for the shortlist - they are able to make a better proposal this yime. And also Egypt is one of the richest countries in the African continent!

Once again, from personal experience ...

At least Cairo is a metroplis rather than an overgrown shanty and squatter town like Nairobi. But it's still lacking in so much of the infrastructure and development that western cities take from granted. And yes, I do believe that the Egyptian Government is sitting on some huge cash reserves, but the average Cairene isn't exactly prosoperous.

Yet even if these were solved (and there's no reason Egypt couldn't do so over the next few decades) there is still the security problem _ Egypt still has problems with its own home grown fundamentalists which really puts a dampener on any such international hopes for the forseeable future.

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Why not Cairo 2016?

I mean they bid for 2008 and although that they weren't selected for the shortlist - they are able to make a better proposal this yime. And also Egypt is one of the richest countries in the African continent!

Ever been to Cairo? If they want to host Olympic Games in the near future, there has to be done a lot of work! Hardly any infrastructure is sufficient right now......

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Ok, I agree, but it would be interesting to see Olympics in Cairo, but... maybe in 20-30 years!

Very interesting, beachvolleyball with pyramids in the background.....One can hardly imagine a scene which is more tempting, but let's be realistic. Cairo will not be an option for the coming 50 years.....

They couldn't organise proper world championships in judo, this year...Some athletes slept in the venue for at least one night. One must not imagine what could happen with a "real"  event.....

Perhaps they should try African Games first.

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Ok, I agree, but it would be interesting to see Olympics in Cairo, but... maybe in 20-30 years!

How could Cairo become a more hospitable place in 20-30 years?  Its biggest problem is that Egypt is a moslem country; how can fundamental thinking change over 20-30 years?  Have you ever seen it change?  If anything, it becomes even more entrenched.  

Alexandria might be a better option -- and being less polluted; but again, it is in a moslem country -- the home of Mohammed Atta and a few thousand like him.  

Ain't gonna happen.

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when there will be a city from Africa, then only from South Africa.

It´s the only country which has the infrastructure and the money. All other African countries have all the same problems: no money, AIDS, poverty, hunger, a huge varity of illness etc

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when there will be a city from Africa, then only from South Africa.

It´s the only country which has the infrastructure and the money. All other African countries have all the same problems: no money, AIDS, poverty, hunger, a huge varity of illness etc

It doesn't happen often Zenica, but for once I agree with you.

:D

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Ok, I agree, but it would be interesting to see Olympics in Cairo, but... maybe in 20-30 years!

Very interesting, beachvolleyball with pyramids in the background.....One can hardly imagine a scene which is more tempting, but let's be realistic. Cairo will not be an option for the coming 50 years.....

They couldn't organise proper world championships in judo, this year...Some athletes slept in the venue for at least one night. One must not imagine what could happen with a "real"  event.....

Perhaps they should try African Games first.

Well, Egypt is hosting the African Cup of Nations at this time. However, it doesn't mean that an Olympic Games can work there, too. Too bad about what is going on over there right now.

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  • 3 weeks later...
the new 70,000 stadium completed in cape town by late 2008, including the completion of a park area around the stadium could make the bid more than just a feet wetting experience...existing new venues that actually are already there could get the IOC excited but in a different way to paris...more in a "wow cape town has facilties complete, what a big difference to 1997..."
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Cape Town to get 2010 super stadium boost

By Staff Reporter

Cape Town is to get a new 70 000-seat domed stadium in time for the 2010 World Cup on the site of the old Green Point track near the existing stadium.

This development gives the Mother City a serious claim to host glamour ties in the latter stages of the World Cup.

Bid committee chairperson Danny Jordaan said the new Green Point Stadium should be celebrated by Cape Town, as it would accommodate matches past the group stages and well into the knock-out stages of the World Cup.

Commenting on the announcement of the new stadium in parliament on Monday, Jordaan said the new stadium would definitely be on the final list to be presented to the world body Fifa.

The new stadiums would be owned by the municipalities

“Cape Town can certainly celebrate the fact that Fifa and their commercial partners viewed the city as a destination of international stature and that they would like to keep it involved in the World Cup tournament for as long as possible.

“That would only have been possible with a stadium that has a capacity greater than 40 000. The new stadium has given us as organisers a significant boost.”

Details of the new stadium were to be announced by premier Ebrahim Rasool and mayor Nomaindia Mfeketo today at noon, at a media briefing at the Green Point stadium.

Deputy sports minister Gert Oosthuizen announced the Cape Town’s venue for the 2010 World Cup during a sitting of parliament on Monday.

He said South Africa would refurbish five existing stadiums and build five new ones in time for the soccer showcase.

But can a new stadium be built in Green Point in time?

A total of R242-million had been allocated for “planning for the stadiums”. Other new stadiums would be built at Polokwane in Limpopo; Mbombela in Mpumalanga; in Port Elizabeth; and in Durban.

Oosthuizen emphasised that the new stadiums would be owned by the municipalities on behalf of the people of South Africa.

The new Green Point stadium would be roofed by a dome that could be closed in bad weather.

The announcement ends months of speculation about Cape Town’s preferred venue for the World Cup.

It also caught local football administrators completely off guard.

The City of Cape Town, the provincial government and the SA Football Association (Safa) Western Province have at various times put forward Athlone, Newlands rugby stadium and a R460-million new stadium in Delft as proposed sites for the main world cup venue.

The proposed stadium would be on par with the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff that has hosted the English FA Cup Finals in recent years, while Wembley, the traditional home of English football, undergoes a major revamp.

Shado Twala, spokesperson for Rasool, said Rasool was expected to announce specific details of the new stadium.

These would include how much would be spent on the new stadium, its capacity, how many jobs the new complex would create and what it could be used for after 2010.

The stadium would help to regenerate what was a fairly run-down area near the city centre, she added.

But can a new stadium be built in Green Point in time?

A new structure on the site of the old stadium would not be a change in existing land use so is unlikely to need rezoning. But any development which has the potential for being detrimental to the environment, which could include such problems as noise or light, has to be subject to an environmental impact assessment (EIA) in terms of national environmental legislation.

The area around the existing stadium has been city commonage for centuries, and has been used for recreation for well over a century.

For example, the Metropolitan Golf Club just opposite the stadium was established in 1895.

The common also accommodated a prisoner of war camp during the South African War.

The EIA process includes a scoping report, which is the initial step and which identifies the various potential impacts of a planned development, including heritage.

It is certain that a proposed major development like this will, at the very least, involve an EIA process that will focus specifically, but not exclusively, on such issues as heritage and traffic.

Because an EIA process includes statutory public consultation and a possible appeal process at the end before final approval is granted, it could take months – even years – before a single brick is laid.

However, the government is about to introduce revised EIA regulations that have been designed specifically to reduce the length of a EIA process and avoid delays.

Environment minister Marthinus van Schalkwyk told the Cape Argus in an interview last week that the new regulations would be published “in the foreseeable future”.

“It is important to align our development goals with our environmental objectives.”

The new regulations would simplify processes but not lower environmental standards.

Although there has been speculation over the past two weeks about plans for a mega stadium in Green Point, the city’s two Premier league clubs Ajax and Santos were taken by surprise by the announcement.

Neither Ajax boss John Comitis or his opposite number at Santos, Goolam Allie, had been told about the plan or approached for input.

Safa Western Province originally proposed a new stadium for the Delft/Blue Downs area, suggesting that the aim should be to take football to the areas where most of the game’s supporters lived.

Another proposal, put forward by the Cape Town City Council and the Western Cape Provincial Government, was that Athlone Stadium should be developed into a World Cup class stadium.

The original proposal by the SA Football Association national body was that to save great expense, Newlands should be upgraded.

This was the original plan as contained in the body’s bid book, with which Danny Jordaan’s bid committee won the right to host the World Cup.

'Central Park NY may soon come to Cape Town'

By Henri du Plessis

Green Point residents and even many of its leaders were caught by surprise when it was announced this week that a large, ultra-modern stadium would be built at Green Point, Cape Town, primarily to host matches for the soccer World Cup in 2010.

Plans are still sketchy, but roleplayers close to the development have unveiled some of the thinking behind the huge project.

The stadium will seat 68 000 and will have a closing roof. It will be designed as a multi-purpose venue and will not be solely for football, they say.

Green Point Common will remain a public space with sports and leisure facilities to be enjoyed by all residents.

'Part of the plan is to incorporate a series of sports grounds'

Affordable housing plans do not form part of the picture, planners say.

One of the guidelines to be followed will be a limit on "too much cement".

"The planning and construction of the stadium will be one big process, with public participation, integrated transport planning, heritage assessments and the involvement of all current leaseholders," said Teral Cullen, the City of Cape Town's director of the 2010 World Cup.

"We have to identify a preferred site and a viable alternative site for the stadium," she said.

"Of course we are looking at the existing stadium site, but one cannot tell at this early stage," she added.

"Part of the plan is to incorporate a series of sports grounds and we want to accommodate all current users, but to give their facilities a facelift.

"The broad principle remains to keep the area as a green zone."

Cullen said it was recognised that the residential areas around the common were of a high density nature and that residents needed an outlet for outdoor activities.

For that, walking and jogging paths and recreational areas would be incorporated.

Environmental and heritage impact assessments would be carefully done to ensure the stadium and linked developments fitted in.

"We anticipate finding a burial ground in the area.

"The old Fort Wynyard also comes into the picture and we have some exciting ideas for that," she said.

The interests of leaseholders would be considered.

Concerns about sufficient parking near the stadium, as well as potential traffic jams were being addressed by the proper planning of a public transport system, said Dr Laurine Platzky, acting head of the province's department of cultural affairs and sport.

"It is too early to discuss the design of the stadium, but this aspect has to be properly done from the outset."

Despite the surprise with which many people greeted the announcement of the stadium, Platzky insisted that wide consultation had taken place.

"Fifa suggested they would have liked Cape Town to be involved with the World Cup for much longer. With Athlone Stadium and even Newlands, this was not possible.

"By moving away from Newlands, therefore, which is a 48 000-seater stadium, we are raising the city's profile in the World Cup.

"But the benefits to the city will go on well beyond 2010, as it could be used to host a great variety of events, such as shows and music events.

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