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Brazil 2014 World Cup...


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Are any of you guys following what's going on at FIFA at the moment? The organisation is collapsing in on itself, with infighting, accusations of corruption (some proven, others under investigation), four suspended members and now claims the 2022 World Cup was "bought" from their General Secretary

Would be interested on your thoughts in this thread since your country is having to work with them to host the world cup...

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Lately, specially about World Cup 2014 and Rio 2016 we see the differences between FIFA and IOC and how IOC is waysssssssssssssssssssssssssss better in terms of planning, cheking and delivering the games.

Rio is doing nice with the preparations for the Olympic Games... Sambadrome already under construction of new stands, BRTs and subway under way, renovation of Port a little bit delayed but working...

Meanwhile, also in Rio, Maracana is a bit delayed and Brazilian Federation of Football new venue for training is very delayed.

Good idea on just jackhammering the Brasilia stadium - I love the failed implosion footage though.

Even more funny was the engineer on TV saying that the implosion failed because the old stadium was very well built, more than he thought.

Which 2014 host city has the most killer bee incidents?

Cuiaba is the one.

A match nearby (well, not that near, but Cuiaba is the nearest host city) last weekend had an attack of killer bees...

http://g1.globo.com/mato-grosso-do-sul/noticia/2011/05/ataque-de-abelhas-jogadores-repercute-mais-que-futebol-em-ms.html

Footage for you guys.

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The project of Fortaleza was really beautiful. But it is very difficult to choose the "most beautiful". All 2014 stadium projects (except the actual of São Paulo) are beautiful, but I put Brasilia, Manaus, Recife, Natal and Fortaleza above the others.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Montserrat to kick off preliminary competition for 2014 FIFA World Cup

The preliminary competition of the 2014 FIFA World Cup™ will start in Malabar, Trinidad, on 15 June 2011, with Montserrat welcoming Belize to the Larry Gomes Stadium. This encounter kicks off the lengthiest football tournament in the world, with no fewer than 832 matches expected to be played across the six confederations to determine which 31 of the 203 participating countries will be battling for Planet Football’s most coveted crown alongside automatically qualified hosts Brazil in June/July 2014. Bhutan, Guam, Mauritania and Brunei Darrussalam have not registered for the competition.

Preliminary qualification rounds will be held in the North, Central America and Caribbean region and in the Asian Zone in June and July. 180 associations will then be drawn by lots in the Preliminary Draw on 30 July (15h00 local time/20h00 CET) in Rio de Janeiro in five of the confederations, namely AFC, CAF, CONCACAF; OFC and UEFA. No lots will be drawn for South America, where the qualifying round will be played in a league system according to CONMEBOL’s match schedule. Please visit FIFA.com for the detailed draw formats, direct link: http://www.fifa.com/worldcup/preliminaries/index.html. The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking of 27 July 2011 will be used for the continental draws, with the exception of CONCACAF, who have already used the March 2011 rankings for the first round of the preliminary competition in that region.

There had been no changes with regard to the allocation of places at Brazil 2014. As the FIFA Executive Committee confirmed at the beginning of March, Europe will receive 13 places, Africa 5, South America 4.5, Asia 4.5, North, Central America and the Caribbean 3.5 and Oceania 0.5. There will however be a change in the determination of the opponents for the play-offs between confederations. A draw will take place at a press conference following the meeting of the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Organizing Committee on 29 July 2011 in Rio.

For the 2010 FIFA World Cup preliminaries some 20 million fans – an average of almost 23,000 per match – flocked to the stadiums, creating a new attendance record in the history of the FIFA World Cup preliminary competition. The undisputed leaders in this respect were Mexico, whose home matches attracted a total attendance of almost 735,000 fans, or almost 82,000 per match. England's triumphant campaign, meanwhile, was watched live by an impressive 80,000 fans per match. 5602 players took part in total. Also involved were 310 referees and 650 assistants.

So as not to miss any of the action, FIFA.com will supply global coverage of the entire competition, from preliminary matches through to the Final in July 2014 in Brazil, offering football fans a one-stop shop website with real-time coverage. Live match coverage will be available for every game and will range from basic information to full MatchCast coverage with editorial commentaries, statistics and photos.

Source: FIFA.com

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  • 2 weeks later...

Yes, we don't have stadiums, that's why we are BUILDING them. About the airports, some are in works, others in the tender phase and others in the design phase. Sao Paulo is really the biggest concern. The LOC admitted yesterday. But they have started construction of the stadium. They still have to submit the financial guarantees.

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A huge mass media company from a developed country detracting the works for some sports competion to be held in a developing country.

It's already a classic cliché of journalism in the 21st century.

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Cape Town offers World Cup expertise \

Shaun Benton

Cape Town has been teaching the Brazilians a few off-the-field tricks ahead of the South American giant's hosting of the Fifa World Cup in 2014.

At a "networking breakfast" on Friday organised by Wesgro, senior federal, state and local government officials from across Brazil met their local counterparts who were directly involved in the World Cup last year.

Cape Town's 2010 provincial coordinator, Dr Laurine Platzky, the City of Cape Town's 2010 director Dave Hugo, and chief project manager of the Cape Town stadium, Dr Andre Lambrechts, were among the leading officials who gave presentations on the lessons Brazil could learn from their experiences.

They were joined by Cape Town Tourism CEO Mariette du Toit-Helmbold and Nils Flaatten, the chief executive of Wesgro, the Western Cape Investment and Trade Promotion Agency.

Platzky told the Brazilians that the organisers of the Western Cape leg of the World Cup focused on a few key priorities, including taking a sustainable development approach to the building of infrastructure, local skills and related entrepreneurial development, as well as ecologically friendly "green goal" practices.

Part of the green goals experience, which was presented by the city's green goal manager, Lorraine Gerrants, was the mitigation of 95% of the carbon emissions of the World Cup, according to a Wesgro statement.

These included the electricity used at the Cape Town Stadium and Fifa Fan Fest that Gerrants said came from renewable sources, along with 65% of the waste in the stadium that was recycled, while 53% of fans used public or non-motorised transport, instead of cars.

Platzky told the Brazilian delegation that it was important for the operational teams in each host city to work closely together.

The relationships that were built during the event between the national, provincial and city authorities, the police, Metro police, traffic services and emergency services created a strong security legacy for Cape Town

"If we have any major crisis in Cape Town now, we can mobilise a response team within hours with a strategic plan to address the problem," Platzky said.

Other long-term benefits come from extra rescue helicopters, ambulances and emergency personnel that were brought in, along with the development of sports facilities and sports development programmes across the province and the opening of township community centres.

Then there was the integrated rapid transport system, which is still being rolled out across the city, and Cape Town's revamped airport.

A-big.gif | A-small.gif

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A huge mass media company from a developed country detracting the works for some sports competion to be held in a developing country.

Fact is, it's not the media making this stuff up; FIFA have come out in no uncertain terms and said they're not happy. This is the second time in as many months. They may be corrupt, but they do know how to organise a successful world cup.

The media got most of their criticisms of South Africa 2010 wrong, but on the other hand it got most of the criticisms of Delhi 2010 right. And thank God the media were there to report on and put pressure on the Indian organisers.

The media will write what they write. The best way to shut them up is not to whine about them, but to make sure everything runs smoothly. That's what South Africa did and their critics soon hushed up.

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Fact is, it's not the media making this stuff up; FIFA have come out in no uncertain terms and said they're not happy. This is the second time in as many months. They may be corrupt, but they do know how to organise a successful world cup.

The media got most of their criticisms of South Africa 2010 wrong, but on the other hand it got most of the criticisms of Delhi 2010 right. And thank God the media were there to report on and put pressure on the Indian organisers.

The media will write what they write. The best way to shut them up is not to whine about them, but to make sure everything runs smoothly. That's what South Africa did and their critics soon hushed up.

But this is strange because the same FIFA praised the progress in Brazil recently. What could have changed within one month? I think we progress this month, especially in the most critical point that is the stadium in São Paulo, which started its works. infrastructure works and airports have already begun in several cities.

Blatter statement in May:

http://www.copa2014.org.br/en/news/6969/MR+BLATTER+SAYS+HE+IS+SATISFIED+WITH+PROGRESS+OF+WORLD+CUP+PROJECTS.html

Valcke statement in June (portuguese link):

http://www1.folha.uol.com.br/esporte/923705-em-meio-a-crise-fifa-elogia-brasil-2014.shtml

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Who would be so kind to provide a summary of the progress of all the World Cup stadia?

e.g.

- 1 image

- Project Name

- Construction Start

- Construction End

- Challenges

- Other:

I did something of this in May (page 52). I will prepare an update soon.

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FIFA aims to keep politics out of 2014 World Cup, separates former warring foes in qualifiers

ZURICH — FIFA is trying to limit political clashes in the 2014 World Cup qualifiers by separating Russia-Georgia and Armenia-Azerbaijan in the European draw.

The governing body says it honored a request by European soccer authorities to keep the former warring neighbors apart when qualifying groups are drawn July 30 in Rio de Janeiro. The teams were also kept separate in the 2012 European Championship qualifiers.

Armenia and Azerbaijan have no diplomatic relations. They were drawn together in Euro 2008 qualifying but the matches were never played. Russia and Georgia were briefly at war in August 2008.

FIFA says UEFA was the only one of its six continental confederations to make special requests.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/dcunited/fifa-aims-to-keep-politics-out-of-2014-world-cup-separates-former-warring-foes-in-qualifiers/2011/06/27/AGT3dbnH_story.html

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Sixteen hopefuls embark on Brazil path

The lengthy Asian Zone qualifying campaign for the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™ begins tomorrow (29), with 16 of the continent’s lowest-ranked teams playing first round, first-leg ties. The second legs will unfold on 3 July.

These may be the continent’s developing footballing nations, but they are by no means lacking in motivation as they seek breakthrough on the international scene. The eight aggregate winners will advance to join 22 higher-ranked sides in the next stage.

And the upcoming match-ups are full of intrigue themselves. Bangladesh play host to Pakistan in an all-south Asian affair, while Laos resume their rivalry with Cambodia. The enigmatic Timor-Leste enter only their second Asian Zone qualification campaign and in west Asia, Afghanistan cross swords with Palestine in their first-ever meeting.

Asian Zone qualifying, first round, first-leg fixtures:

29 June

Malaysia-Chinese Taipei

Bangladesh-Pakistan

Cambodia-Laos

Sri Lanka-Philippines

Afghanistan-Palestine

Vietnam-Macau

Nepal-Timor-Leste

Mongolia-Myanmar

Source: FIFA.com

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Work continuing on Brazil 2014 stadiums

Work is progressing on the stadiums that will host matches at the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™. The latest pictures released by Arena, the company providing technical support services to the Local Organising Committee’s stadiums project, were taken this month and show how the match venues are shaping up.

As the new images reveal, some of the new stadiums being built for the tournament are starting to take shape, with work on the foundations now complete. Meanwhile, refurbishments at existing stadiums are also moving along.

The 12 stadiums to be used at Brazil 2014 are as follows: Mineirao (Belo Horizonte), Estadio Nacional (Brasilia), Arena Pantanal (Cuiaba), Arena da Baixada (Curitiba), Castelao (Fortaleza), Arena Amazonia (Manaus), Arena das Dunas (Natal), Beira-Rio (Porto Alegre), Arena Pernambuco (Recife), Maracana (Rio de Janeiro), Arena Fonte Nova (Salvador) and Itaquerao (Sao Paulo).

Rio de Janeiro

rioh.jpg

Brasília

braslia.jpg

Belo Horizonte

belohorizonte.jpg

Cuiabá

cuiab.jpg

Fortaleza

fortalezat.jpg

Manaus

manaus.jpg

Porto Alegre

portoalegrej.jpg

Recife

recife.jpg

Salvador

salvador.jpg

São Paulo

itaquera_Sao+Paulo.jpg

Source: FIFA.com

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Fact is, it's not the media making this stuff up; FIFA have come out in no uncertain terms and said they're not happy. This is the second time in as many months. They may be corrupt, but they do know how to organise a successful world cup.

The media got most of their criticisms of South Africa 2010 wrong, but on the other hand it got most of the criticisms of Delhi 2010 right. And thank God the media were there to report on and put pressure on the Indian organisers.

The media will write what they write. The best way to shut them up is not to whine about them, but to make sure everything runs smoothly. That's what South Africa did and their critics soon hushed up.

My point is about how the media puts this on big letters:

"Concerns over Brazil World Cup" - what you think when you read this?

Probably Brazil won't be able to deliver everything in time. And FIFA will replace Brazil as host country.

At this very moment no stadium is expected to be delivered after the deadline FIFA asked (December 2013).

Fifa asked 5 stadiums to be ready to Confederations Cup. At this moment 9 will be ready before Confederations Cup. The problem is Sao Paulo, expected to be in this tournament, and will be not - because the city is late.

So, I think, we are not concerned about stadiums in Brazil, as the media abroad wants to scream around.

I agree somethigs are delayed, specially airports (my huge concern about infra-structure, specially in Sao Paulo and some smaller host cities), but still there are plenty time to solve this.

Mass media, unfortunatelly, is making the strom in the teacup too early.

And Jérome Valcke seems to be a real idiot. When he come to Brazil he said everything was in time and right. When he got back to Switzerland said a lot of **** of us...

Decide yourself Mr. Valcke and then make a statement.

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