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Ideas For The Opening/closing Ceremony?


Lord David
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I know that this will sound really lame... but I really hope Stompin Tom shows up to sing The Hockey Song. It would be kind of reminiscent of Waltzing Matilda in Sydney. It's one of those truly iconic songs that really has a relevance at a Winter Olympics in Canada :rolleyes:

And on the whole topic of 'multi-culturalism' aspect - have a segment where different cultural groups come on at intervals, playing or dancing for like 30 seconds, and each group combine together to form say, the flag, the maple leaf etc. An excellent way to show the fabric of the nation - and very particularly, the host city. I don't think having a large proportion of the ceremonies dedicated to this, but it is a component to what we are today, and should be included in the storytelling of Canada.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Uh, people have lived here for at least that long. And the First Peoples of coastal BC had a sophisticated system of intercultural commerce. You mean no white people. Which is more than a little bit racist.

^ I fully applaud that idea. Canada's vastness has long defined who we are as a people. Canada is not a 5000 year old nation like China or Greece. But there is great beauty in the 5000 mile journey from Atlantic to Pacific shores.

And you clearly aren't from Vancouver, where the idea that Canadian=European is neither true or widely embraced. But instead of a multi-culti p*ss*ng match, the obvious solution is to celebrate it all. I expect there will be a combination of the Coast Salish creation stories and the modern history of Canada from the Vikings to today's migrants. And that's what should be included: our story.

I like the idea of Sea-to-Sea-to-Sea myself. Atlantic (icebergs, Celtic culture, Acadia, Québec) to sea (Nunavut, Churchill, Santa! H0H 0H0) to sea (railroad, European settlers, Chinese and Punjabi railroad builders). And then all of us together.

Agreed

And as for the cultures that should be represented, only Irish, Scottish, French, English and German culture have any place in producing the collective culture of Canada. Who I am as a Canada has not been shaped by Chinese, Indian, Punjubi, Pakistani, Korean or whoever else's culture because they don't blend themselves into Canadian culture but remain distinct and that has no place in a ceremony that's mission should be to present a collective, unifying Canadian culture to the world.

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Little do you guys know it but I think this discussion has opened a really interesting question about Canada and it's culture. What defines canadian culture? What is at the heart of it? Is it definable? Is it even there? Does it exist?

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Someone has a politically correct rod up their arse.

Canada as a nation and civilization has only existed for roughly 400 years, so its not racist to say that we don't have a 5000 year history. The aboriginal nations don't consider themselves Canadian but define themselves based on ancestral nations that do date back some time but are a part from the Canadian identity, culture and the modern civilization that is Canada.

Why should be celebrate multi-culturalism at all? Its a cancerous policy that has destroyed every attempt to unify the Canadian identity. I fully support my statement, culture's that have had no place in producing the Canadian identity have no place in the opening ceremony from something that is suppose to be 'Canada's Games'.

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Why should be celebrate multi-culturalism at all? Its a cancerous policy that has destroyed every attempt to unify the Canadian identity. I fully support my statement, culture's that have had no place in producing the Canadian identity have no place in the opening ceremony from something that is suppose to be 'Canada's Games'.

Well, if we don't celebrate where we come 'from', then there really isn't much to our identity is there? I guess that you want us to just celebrate our cliches - hockey, snow, mounties, Tim Hortons etc? No matter how you break it down, we ALL come from somewhere, even the First Nations started out somewhere else, albeit sometime ago.

Vancouver is a 'new' city, like Canada is as a nation. We are a society that is defined by where you've come from, whether it be from other parts of Canada or other areas in the world. It would be hard to have a games in Vancouver, that doesn't celebrate people from Newfoundland, Quebec, Ontario as much as China, Mexico, India, Brazil, France, or the UK.

I'm born and raised in this city (yes, there ARE some of us that actually have the name 'Vancouver' on their birth certificate) and have seen first hand it change before my eyes. It has brought about some challenges, but when you stop and look around, you realize how all of these mixing cultures is what is defining us. And maybe, a celebration like this is what can define us together, as culture is somewhat defined by it's shared experiences...

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yeah..... but that's just it. here in america, we all came from somewhere but the culture and identity we have forged here is dominant over the culture we brough with us. I can't say or see that for Canada. a significant part of American culture is what the land gave us. I don't know what the land called Canada has given to you guys, but it doesn't seem like much.

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The bricks came from different quarries, but the wall is all Canadian.

Canada is a young nation comprised of different elements. What came before were different nations, none of which were called or identified with what is now known Canada. I referred to Canada the nation. Not Canada the land. There are big differences.

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hummmmmmmm............that's very intteresting Kendegra, but in the end what makes this so called "wall" Canadian? That is the gist of the question. Is there something special in the way that the " bricks" have been put together that makes the way canadian? D

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It is a diverse country. Does it need an identity? I mean, when you look at most countries under the microscope, their so-called national identity doesn't necessarily translate into the DNA of the country. Culture is localized, not nationalized. A person from Paris has a much different life than someone from Provence. A Californian is different from a Texan. And Wales is not England. So called national identity is mostly just stereotypes. People are fundamentally individuals, not nationalities. They may identify with something or rally behind a symbol, but they make their own definition of who they are.

So on the surface, Canada does have a national identity...beavers and Mounties and maple leafs and hockey players and igloos and mountains and forests and big wide open spaces. And a value system of inclusiveness and individuality and personal freedom and community connectedness and respect for others and for nature. People just choose not to see it because they think identity is served on a plate or worn in a costume. It is subtle, but I have no doubt that a Canadian identity exists and it runs deep in the people that love this land.

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Hello! I'm back, and now I'm happy to hear from you again!

Oh, okay, let me help...

I've shared some of my ideas and hopes before. I don't think the individual provinces should be specifically represented, but perhaps in allegory. I want to see the story of Vancouver, of BC, and of Canada and the things that tie us together. Symbols such as the exploration, the natural landscape, the railroad, the maple leaf, multiculturalism, hockey, art from the Group of 7 and Emily Carr, first nations stories, and old and new national treasures.

Some inspirations...

Leonard Cohen recites "Anthem".

"The winters of my childhood were long, long seasons. We lived in three places - the school, the church and the skating rink - but our life was on the skating rink."

I have inspirations too... Look at these videos! Maybe these can be modified or done for the Vancouver opening ceremony.

Here we see the geese that fly over Winnipeg every summer. I wonder which animals are common in Vancouver every winter?

Also mind the placards. For Vancouver it could be an resemblance of a First Nations object, like the logo. Winnipeg's logo depicts agricultura fields and has wheat on the placards' sides, to represent its agribusiness economy.

Bad trip, the part where Roméo LeBlanc (Governor General of Canada at that time) entered the stadium was not shown! He greeted with the Vice Regal Salute, of course. Let's hope that Michelle Jean or her succesor in office will be given the same treatment.

The Vice Regal Salute that was given to LeBlanc (and some of what's missing from the videos!)

Here we see a big Canadian flag (I think like the one the Canadian athletes show off at Olympic Games), carried by those people from I think the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. I liked the children standing before the main stand, and that lovely version of the national anthem. Beat that for Vancouver, the flypast at the end will be impossible, however. (The children can be skaters.)

From this clip we can get that a band of drums and bagpipes can play the flag entrance music and then play a wordless version of the Olympic Hymn (like Torino)! Let the band play as it exits. There's also the torch update, why not do that like Atlanta and SLC? The speeches were cut out.

Here we can see a nice performance featuring a presentation with hoops and oars. Maybe Vancouver would go for winter sports stuff? Also there would be skating (including that Maria von Trapp kind of singer) and some stars like Johnny Crishna (if I spelled him right, but that's what the commentator said). At te end of the equivalent performance for Vancouver, the official song, in case of one, would be performed. The song here is called "Reach Out For The Gold". Can you identify the singer in the second part? Also flashlights, instead of foil, are acceptable.

This clip's right! Vancouver's multiculturalism should be celebrated! How about a bilingual song? There are Filipinos living in Vancouver, so why not acknowledge them in the OC like Winnipeg did? Can anyone identify the singers in this clip?

For the finale, yes, its the Olympic Flame! They should have a video about the Calgary 1988 torch relay. The torchbearers at BC Place must be Calgary veterans, but it may be impossible because there was no gold for Canada there. Then try reprising the official song for the finale. Fireworks outside BC Place, perhaps? (This happened at the closing ceremony of the 1972 winter Olympics in Sapporo where there were fireworks outside the indoor venue at the end.) Maybe flashlights should be lit during it. And as for the lighting of the cauldron, it should be better than the one in the clip.

To listen to the background music of the flame's approach to the cauldron and its lighting, use the link to the sound files above. You may hear Brian Williams at the end. He went to Winnipeg for this event 10 years ago that all Canadians should be proud of?! That (the sound-only clip) was take from the host nation's coverage done by - where else - the CBC.

Now, what do you think?

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I have inspirations too... Look at these videos! Maybe these can be modified or done for the Vancouver opening ceremony.

Here we see the geese that fly over Winnipeg every summer. I wonder which animals are common in Vancouver every winter?

Also mind the placards. For Vancouver it could be an resemblance of a First Nations object, like the logo. Winnipeg's logo depicts agricultura fields and has wheat on the placards' sides, to represent its agribusiness economy.

I highly doubt they'd spend so much time on the placards, a nice looking sign will do.

We see geese here too, they mess up the field across from my house every year.

Bad trip, the part where Roméo LeBlanc (Governor General of Canada at that time) entered the stadium was not shown! He greeted with the Vice Regal Salute, of course. Let's hope that Michelle Jean or her succesor in office will be given the same treatment.

The Vice Regal Salute that was given to LeBlanc (and some of what's missing from the videos!)

I hope Jean gets the same treatment Athens gave the Greek President in the opening.

Here we see a big Canadian flag (I think like the one the Canadian athletes show off at Olympic Games), carried by those people from I think the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. I liked the children standing before the main stand, and that lovely version of the national anthem. Beat that for Vancouver, the flypast at the end will be impossible, however. (The children can be skaters.)

We should just copy that lol.....a flypast would still be possible, it just wouldn't be seen by the spectators.

I really like that rendition of O Canada, the choir....and how they add the second verse of the anthem.

From this clip we can get that a band of drums and bagpipes can play the flag entrance music and then play a wordless version of the Olympic Hymn (like Torino)! Let the band play as it exits. There's also the torch update, why not do that like Atlanta and SLC? The speeches were cut out.

They play the Olympic Hymn in the PanAmerican Games??? Why???

I don't like the torch update, it's awkward and interrupts the theatrical mood of the ceremony. Atlanta and SLC's were just weird.

For the finale, yes, its the Olympic Flame! They should have a video about the Calgary 1988 torch relay. The torchbearers at BC Place must be Calgary veterans, but it may be impossible because there was no gold for Canada there.

Worst ideas ever.

Seeing how Beijing used one of the nation's famed songs for the national flag entrance, I'd like to see an instrumental version of "Maple Leaf Forever" played:

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Well, whatever ideas are shared here, they won't make a difference. The creative development and scripting of the ceremonies is complete.

Ceremonies FAQ - Last question...

But I think repeating the 1999 Winnipeg ceremonies would be a waste of David Atkins' talents.

Edited by Kendegra
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Well, Kendegra, if canada is a country, it needs an identity. I don't think you are fully accurate in saying that culture is localized and not nationalized. sure, as you mentioned, a californian is different from a texan. BUT THERE IS AN ESSENTIAL UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT IT MEANS TO BE AN AMERICAN!

That's why I'm very interested in hearing how you, in your analogy of likening Canada to a wall, will explain what exactly is this "mortar" that holds these bricks together. What is the "shared identity" in all this dynamic diversity? It must be an ideology that can be translated or embedded into distinctively Canadian things. what say you? For example. The fundamental ideology of american culture is change. This is celebrated in the dynamism of everything we do and everything we make. Remember, a lack of a shared identity is why Quebec wants independence! And they'll be at it again.

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Quebec does not want independence. Some Quebeckers want it. And if they really and truly wanted it, they'd get it. Separation is just a political tool they use to scare Ottawa.

Just because Canada doesn't subscribe to the American brand of Nationalism doesn't mean we're some basket case of a country that is barely holding together. Screams of separatism make headlines, but don't read the headlines, read the full story. It is a value system. Peace, order, and good government. Not as sexy as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, but that's Canada's constitutional purpose.

Frankly, I think Canada has more commonalities from coast to coast than the United States does. Newfoundlanders and British Columbians and Quebecois may all sound different, but they have the commonality of hockey, love of outdoors, a profound connection to winter, and an expectation that government will be responsible, health care will be provided, and peace is assured. In the USA? Well, while all of you rally around your flag and apple pie and George Washington, your states and people constantly bicker about social values, politics, immigration, language, culture, and your role in the world. America may have have a powerful unified brand, but that is all symbolism. Look around. The United States is not the melting pot it thinks it is.

And you can't convince me that culture isn't local. Every place in this world that I've ever visited has a unique culture. You certainly can't suggest that a flag and a motto and a few symbols and some history stories are all that you need? National identities exist. No doubt. But true culture is experienced in the streets and homes and village squares, not in the mass media or in government houses.

Edited by Kendegra
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Ruling Czar> As has been pointed out already, Canada is a 'young' country. A country, like anything, requires time to define itself and build on it's history. We were born out of the British North American Act, which established our right to self rule, and which was used by the UK for establishing 'independence' for other commonwealth countries. As we are a constitutional monarchy, we have many similarities to them. As being your neighbour, we feel like we know you as well as we know ourselves, we see you all the time, we often have family that lives on both sides of the border. We share a language, we share some of your ideals. We see your media. I've often heard we are considered America lite - referring to the fact that we share your ideals for laissez faire capitalism, but tempered with the European 'socialism', in that we feel the need to have cradle to grave protection to it's citizens (sidebar comment - this 'socialism' that Americans fear right now really isn't all that bad... I don't get why everyone is so up in arms about people getting help when they need it.).

We have only had a constitution for 25 + years, our flag only came around in the 60's or so. We are devleoping our national 'identity' - your 'identity' has been in place for many more years as your constitution was born out of a war of independence. You patriotism is awesome, and many Canadians wish we showed more pride outwardly like you do. But don't confuse the fact that we don't all have flags in our yard we don't have as much pride in who we are - and love our country.

I agree with Kendegra that culture, customs and practises are much more local. You can't tell me that the 'culture' of Miami is the same as New York, Boston, Chicago or Seattle?

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eloquently said fisher and its good to see that you are aware of your position in the system of things where the US is concerned. I think you did justice in defining your youth. That being said, embracing all that you have said, what do you think vancouver's oc should be like?

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Ruling Czar> As has been pointed out already, Canada is a 'young' country. A country, like anything, requires time to define itself and build on it's history. We were born out of the British North American Act, which established our right to self rule, and which was used by the UK for establishing 'independence' for other commonwealth countries. As we are a constitutional monarchy, we have many similarities to them. As being your neighbour, we feel like we know you as well as we know ourselves, we see you all the time, we often have family that lives on both sides of the border. We share a language, we share some of your ideals. We see your media. I've often heard we are considered America lite - referring to the fact that we share your ideals for laissez faire capitalism, but tempered with the European 'socialism', in that we feel the need to have cradle to grave protection to it's citizens (sidebar comment - this 'socialism' that Americans fear right now really isn't all that bad... I don't get why everyone is so up in arms about people getting help when they need it.).

We have only had a constitution for 25 + years, our flag only came around in the 60's or so. We are devleoping our national 'identity' - your 'identity' has been in place for many more years as your constitution was born out of a war of independence. You patriotism is awesome, and many Canadians wish we showed more pride outwardly like you do. But don't confuse the fact that we don't all have flags in our yard we don't have as much pride in who we are - and love our country.

I agree with Kendegra that culture, customs and practises are much more local. You can't tell me that the 'culture' of Miami is the same as New York, Boston, Chicago or Seattle?

Americanization really didn't occur until the end of the Civil War with the reconstruction and the desire to promote one unified 'culture' to prevent another civil war.

A constitution can't define a country and in practice it had like affect on our governance and political system. A flag doesn't either, Australia doesn't have a unique flag, yet they have a very strong cultural identity.

We definitely don't have laissez faire capitalism, we are a middle-path nation, our banks are a perfect example of that and the strict regulations of many aspects of finance and commerce.

Our biggest problem is that major Canadian history and the earliest forging of the Canadian identity happened in war, something the government curriculum glosses over. Passchendaele, the Sommes, Ypres, Vimy Ridge, Canada's Hundred Days, the invasion of Normandy and Italy, the liberation of the Netherlands, the invasion of Newfoundland, all things that have shaped Canada in the last 100 years, all not known by the vast majority of Canadians.

Edited by Faster
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Americanization really didn't occur until the end of the Civil War with the reconstruction and the desire to promote one unified 'culture' to prevent another civil war.

A constitution can't define a country and in practice it had like affect on our governance and political system. A flag doesn't either, Australia doesn't have a unique flag, yet they have a very strong cultural identity.

We definitely don't have laissez faire capitalism, we are a middle-path nation, our banks are a perfect example of that and the strict regulations of many aspects of finance and commerce.

Our biggest problem is that major Canadian history and the earliest forging of the Canadian identity happened in war, something the government curriculum glosses over. Passchendaele, the Sommes, Ypres, Vimy Ridge, Canada's Hundred Days, the invasion of Normandy and Italy, the liberation of the Netherlands, the invasion of Newfoundland, all things that have shaped Canada in the last 100 years, all not known by the vast majority of Canadians.

That's exactly to my point - a country requires time to define itself. The American Civil War was a defining moment in their history. It's rebirth after is now part of the fabric of the country. The war changed the society. As the US has a 100 year head start on us, they have had more time to define who they are today. Canada has been 'settled' for the same length of time as the US has, but the fact that we have not had the same amount of time to govern ourselves means that we are still developing our own identity. The signing of our constitution (including the Charter of Rights and Freedoms) in 1982 was a BIG defining moment in Canadian History. It greatly changed the judicial powers and has a fundamental effect of the laws of the nation. Our flag, is a BIG part of us - it is what unifies us, the maple leaf is a symbol of our nation. Culture is about what defines a group, and these 2 things are what defines a part of us. I believe what will be our next big defining moment as a society, would be the Quebec question finally being resolved. Hopefully, cool heads will prevail and we will find a way to come together, and out of it will propel us forward as a culture.

I agree with you about our education. I believe that one of the biggest problems that we have is that education is a provincial jurisdiction. Because of that, the federal government really doesn't have much say in what is taught (if there are any teachers - i'm not sure if the federal government has at least a baseline of what needs to be taught?). I think if the federal government had at least some say in subjects of national interest, such as history, that we would learn more about ourselves, and thus, become more self aware. Of course, Quebec would really not be all for this.

I work at a bank (manage a branch actually) and am VERY familiar with the legislation that governs our lending policies. They are in place for a reason and have managed to keep us very well positioned in the world stage. However, that was slowly being erroded and the sub prime lending that has hit the US so hard, was on our doorstep. Most banks began easing up on their lending practises as we fought against eachother for business. CMHC allowed 100% financing. We do ultimately feel that business should be allowed to govern itself accordingly, but when is deemed necessary government must ensure regulation for the protection of it's citizens, which is where our European 'socialism' side kicks in. Our health system is a perfect example of that. Our banks have strong governace, but all countries do regulate their financial system. We just didn't budge as much.

eloquently said fisher and its good to see that you are aware of your position in the system of things where the US is concerned. I think you did justice in defining your youth. That being said, embracing all that you have said, what do you think vancouver's oc should be like?

I agree with many of the comments here in this thread about what should be in them. Give some history of where we came from, show who we are today, showing everyday Canadian lifestyles from coast to coast to coast. Throw in some cliches and I think time would be up.

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But you know.........that argument of "not having enough time to define yourself" is essentially crap! There are countries that are wayyyyyyy younger than Canada that have a profound sense of culture and identity. Try the Caribbean. Barbados is a phenomenal example of this. The culture there is an outstanding. I've been several times and it just amazes me how ppl who basically exist on a grain of sand are able to be so proud of their country. I think you have made a point in outlining canada's youth but it isn't THE POINT!

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