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Vancouver's Gangster Olympics


SkiFreak
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It seems that over the last bunch of weeks there has been a number of shootings in and around Vancouver. Much more than anyone can pretty much remember happening previously. Yesterday was the girl that got shot and killed with the four year-old kid in the car. Today there was another according to CTV BC. This had better come to an end before the games arrive.

One dead, one injured in E. Vancouver shooting

But it's not just in the lower mainland. Here in Kelowna, we've been having an increase in shootings/murders as well, but nowhere near as bad as in the lower mainland.

For those of you that are local (provincially), what are your thoughts on this gang warfare and increase in shootings?

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It really is getting ridiculous, someone innocent is going to get killed at this rate.

There have been like one gang shooting every 1-2 days for the past few weeks, and every single time it has ended with deaths.

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Here's a Google map from CTV BC's website that shows the various shootings. On the news last night they said there was 15 over the last month, the map only shows 13. I guess today's is #16. :unsure:

For those attending the games, don't forget to bring your Kevlar. :blink:

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I was just watching Global BC's news coverage of today's shooting, and then they interrupted with breaking news that there is a shooting going on in Surrey. :o

Gregor Robertson said that the police force is understaffed. They better fix this quick. I wonder how things will be when most of the police forces will be providing security for the games, I wonder who will be watching the streets. :unsure:

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  • 3 weeks later...

Blame it on the Mexicans:

Gang violence in Canada directly linked to Mexico drug wars

21 hours ago

OTTAWA — The increase in gang violence on the streets of Vancouver and other Canadian cities has direct ties to the grisly drug-cartel wars that have terrorized Mexico and some American border towns, say Canadian and U.S. police.

Violence has reached a fever pitch in parts of Mexico where the government of President Felipe Calderon has sent in 45,000 soldiers and 5,000 federal police to try to curb cartel activity. More than 7,000 have died in the last two years, with 1,000 deaths this January alone.

The United States has felt the impact, with the cartels sending assassins across the border and more and more cells springing up across the country to distribute cocaine from the south.

Those distribution lines ultimately lead to Canada, making this country far from immune to what's going on in Mexico, says RCMP Superintendent Pat Fogarty with the combined forces special enforcement unit.

Recent gang-related violence in British Columbia and elsewhere is "directly related to this Mexican war," he said in an interview Tuesday.

Almost all cocaine in Canada comes via Mexico, the hub for South American producers. Canadian-based organized crime groups buy the drug either directly from the cartels in Mexico, or from middlemen in Los Angeles and other American cities.

When the supply of cocaine is hampered by crackdowns in Mexico or in the United States and the price goes up, says Fogarty, competition for the remaining kilos gets tense in Canada. The bigger players with good lines into the south prevail, leaving the smaller ones scrambling.

"People are running around trying to find other sources of cocaine. The price goes up and the guns come out," said Fogarty.

"It's really about power. The people up here want the nice car, the money and the flashy girl beside them, and if they lose that they lose that status and the power."

Canada came up several times at a high-profile U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration news conference last week. The agency announced it had arrested 750 people linked to the notorious Sinaloa cartel, and had seized more than 23 tonnes of drugs.

"From Washington to Maine, we have disrupted this cartel's domestic operations - arresting U.S. cell heads ... and seriously impacting their Canadian drug operations as well," acting administrator Michele Leonhart told reporters.

The U.S. drug agency wouldn't point to a specific case where Canadian police assisted with so-called Operation Xcellerator, although Fogarty says the RCMP is constantly collaborating with American colleagues on trafficking cases.

Special Agent Jeffrey Wagner of the agency's global enforcement unit says the cartels have established cells or distribution points close to the Canadian border. Those cells will help funnel the cocaine to points north. They use flatbed trucks covered with commercial merchandise, or even cars.

Although Mexicans aren't generally at the helm of Canadian gangs, organized crime here does have contact with the Sinaloa and Gulf cartels in Mexico.

"I don't think it's a stretch to see there might be emissaries or people associated with those organizations, making trips for negotiations or to see operations or to be treated by the people they're selling to," said Wagner.

"It's a business, you have people coming from one sector of the world to see what's going on in another sector."

The gangs don't always deal with cash. Often, the Canadians will trade the coke for readily available ecstasy or pot.

Said Wagner: "What happens is the organizations, instead of smuggling currency over the border to pay for cocaine to bring up and then again smuggling ecstasy or marijuana over the border, they look at it as a way to pay their debt."

The U.S. drug agency is trying to raise awareness of the cartel situation in Mexico and its impact on the United States, with some success. Major American newspapers have splashed details of the cartel wars on their front pages.

The Washington Times quoted senior U.S . military officials Tuesday who warned that if Mexico's two main cartels joined forces, they would have the equivalent power of an army of 100,000.

Other senior figures in Washington have named Mexico as one of the top domestic security threats, just behind Pakistan and Iran.

Violence around the cartels has been characterized by the most gruesome kinds of killings. Victims have been decapitated and even disposed of in vats of acid. Civilians have been caught in the crossfire - at a recent festival in Morelia, drug figures threw a grenade into a crowded marketplace.

Canada's Foreign Affairs Department last week revised its travel report for Mexico, warning Canadian tourists to avoid areas around the U.S. border, especially Ciudad Juarez and Tijuana.

Popular tourist destinations such as Puerto Vallarta, the Mayan Riviera and Hualtuco have not been singled out, although the resort towns of Cabo San Lucas and Acapulco are located the affected states of Baja California and Guerrero.

Peter Kent, Minister of State for the Americas, said the Canadian government is collaborating with Mexico on several levels to help it tackle the drug problem, including cooperation at political, military and police levels.

He said the issue of security throughout the region will be a dominant issue at the upcoming Summit of the Americas.

"Canada recognizes and encourages Mexico's crackdown on drug gangs and organized crime, but the side effect of success has been the displacement of some of that to Guatemala and (other countries)," Kent said in an interview.

Copyright © 2009 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianp...e9dUv2Jb1GWM3-Q

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The drug cartel activity has MANY connections all over the Americas that are collapsing financially like dominoes, even as far as Yellowknife. Vancouverites shouldn't be too worried. For there to be more crime in times of decreasing spending power is just a normal effect of people having last resorts. There is no way to stop crime altogether because the social and mental links are far from explainable in a scientific pattern. Be happy that there was less crime in economic expansion, because if it was expanding AND there was more crime, that's a recipe for disaster!

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Gun violence continues with targeted shooting Thursday morning

METRO VANCOUVER — There was another targeted shooting at 2 a.m. Thursday morning in the 3300 block Anzio, near 22nd and Rupert in east Vancouver.

One man was taken to hospital with gunshot wounds, according to police.

The shooting was the seven th in Metro Vancouver in just two days.

Also, Abbotsford Police say they arrested Jonathan Bacon Wednesday night for minor charges that are not gang-related.

The eldest Bacon brother will appear in Abbotsford court later this morning. The warrant for his arrest was issued in Coquitlam.

Meanwhile, Surrey RCMP are looking for one man after a gas station shooting sent two men to hospital Wednesday, the latest in a spree of violence that left two people dead the night before.

Police responded to reports of shots fired at about 7 p.m. at the Chevron station at 72nd Avenue and 122nd Street.

Two men in a red Chevy Malibu stopped to fuel up at a bay at the station. While one man filled the tank, a man approached on foot and shot him in the leg, according to Insp. Dave Walsh.

The gunman then shot the second man, who was in the car, in the head.

Both men were sent to hospital and both are expected to survive the attack, Walsh said.

He said the gunman was seen running away from the scene southbound and police suspect he was picked up by a nearby vehicle.

The shooting comes after homicide investigators in Burnaby and Vancouver were poring over crime scenes Wednesday, searching for clues in the region’s two latest shooting deaths Tuesday night.

Surrey RCMP were investigating three additional shootings that left two wounded, all within hours of each other in another round of gun violence.

Vancouver police identified a man gunned down at Third and Kaslo as 27-year-old Sunil Mall, a convicted drug trafficker who had repeated incidents with police dating back to 2001.

Mall was shot to death as he sat in the driver’s seat of a Toyota in a quiet neighbourhood.

The shooting was not believed to be related to a double shooting in Burnaby less than two hours earlier that left a young woman dead and a man in hospital in critical condition.

Cpl. Dale Carr of the integrated homicide investigation team said it may take a while to confirm the identity of a woman killed on the 25th floor of the highrise, since no photo identification has been located. He said investigators may need to travel to China to prove who she is.

“At this point, we have a piece of identification that doesn’t provide us a positive identification of the deceased,” he said.

A man in his 30s who was also shot remained in hospital in critical condition and was unable to be interviewed by police.

Carr said investigators had a few working theories about the double shooting that “range from criminality to domestic, and a few in between.”

He said that based on the man’s injuries, it was clearly not a murder-attempted suicide. He said the building has surveillance and an electronic entry system that should aid the probe.

“We are getting that downloaded,” he said of the video. “The other nice thing is that the building is on a fob system [a radio-frequency ID chip in a key fob] so it identifies the [movement] of individuals. So we will analyse that. There is a great deal more work. There are at least 200 homes in that building,” Carr said.

Homicide detectives and forensic identification officers worked through the night where Mall was killed. Search and canvass teams were expected to be back on the scene today.

Insp. Bob Chapman said residents near the slaying called 911 to report several shots fired at about 9:50 p.m. When police arrived they saw the silver car with a shattered window, shell casings and blood.

The victim was slumped at the wheel with blood on his face.

“Right now it has all the marks of another gangland-style hit,” Chapman said at the scene.

At least 20 police cruisers were blocking streets around the shooting.

Chapman said witnesses saw two men in dark clothing fleeing on foot.

In Surrey, investigators were called to three separate shooting incidents overnight Tuesday to Wednesday, with two people being treated in hospital for gunshot wounds.

The first occurred at 8:04 p.m. in the area of 130th Street and 68A Avenue, where residents reported hearing a number of shots. The gunman was believed to have fled in a white Infiniti SUV and police later learned a 22-year-old Somali male had been taken to a hospital with a gunshot wound to his buttocks. RCMP Sgt. Roger Morrow said the victim was known to police and was involved in the drug trade. His condition was listed as critical but he was expected to survive, Morrow said.

The second incident took place just before midnight, when a series of shots was fired into a residence in the area of 154th Street and 110th Avenue. No one was hurt but Morrow said the house was known to police as a “crack shack.”

At 2:47 a.m. Wednesday, police were called to a hospital after a second male appeared in the emergency department suffering from a gunshot wound to the leg. The victim was described as an Indo-Canadian male, 22, known to police and involved in the drug trade. Police believe he was shot in the vicinity of 180th Street and 32nd Avenue in south Surrey.

kbolan@vancouversun.com

gbellett@vancouversun.com

With files from Katya Holloway, Catherine Rolfsen and Mary Frances Hill

© Copyright © The Vancouver Sun

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  • 1 month later...

Seems like Vancouver is getting international recognition now, for the violence that is happening.

From CTV BC:

http://www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/C...ishColumbiaHome

UK paper bemoans Vancouver's 'blood-spattered streets'

Updated: Tue Apr. 07 2009 09:36:25

ctvbc.ca

The very public violence that's plaguing the Vancouver region is now getting international attention.

A scathing article published by a prominent London newspaper is being condemned by Vancouver's mayor as a cheap shot to our reputation as he seeks to defend the Vancouver brand.

Gang-style murders like the one Saturday night are the kind of images people have been seeing of the city since the latest spate of shootings began in January. When you map it out -- there are very few areas untouched by the bloodshed -- and 24 murders since January 1st alone.

The headline in Britain's Sunday Independent newspaper on April 5 read: "From heaven to hell: 18 die as drugs war rages on streets of Vancouver."

The story was a scathing look at Vancouver's slide from the best place to live to "blood-spattered streets littered with shell casings and corpses."

One tourist said they believed Vancouver to be a safe city since they arrived.

"From what we've read we would assume [Vancouver would] be quite a safe city. That's why we're here..."

But she added they might have thought twice if confronted with such a story.

Marketing experts say politicians and tourism officials should take this very seriously.

"Reality doesn't matter a damn, perception is everything," says Lindsay Meredith, a Simon Fraser University marketing expert.

"This kind of coverage can blow away a lot of very hard work in advertising, in developing those overseas connections, in presenting Vancouver as a brand that is a very desirable end market."

Vancouver's mayor, Gregor Robertson, was a little plainer with his language.

"I think it's a bit of a cheap shot," he said.

But while he might not like the article, Robertson doesn't dispute its message or its potential impact.

"We have to stop the current violence and get back to what people know Vancouver as which is a peaceful, safe city. That has to be our goal urgently working towards that has to be top priority."

So it seems officials have their work cut out to keep Vancouver's image from becoming the latest victim of metro Vancouver's raging gang war.

To read the Sunday Independent's story click here.

With a report CTV British Columbia's Stephen Smart.

Here is the original article from The Independent in the UK

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/am...er-1663008.html

From heaven to hell: 18 die as drugs war rages on streets of Vancouver

The Canadian city has been named the best place in the world to live. But those halcyon days are over

By Paul Rodgers

Sunday, 5 April 2009

Once upon a very recent time, Vancouver had a clean, safe image. Nestled between a spectacular bay and snow-capped mountains, this Canadian city, which is twice the size of Birmingham, was described by The Economist as the most liveable in the world. Not any more. As it prepares to host the 2010 Winter Olympics, what it's got now is not cuddly, eco-friendly publicity, but blood-spattered streets littered with shell casings and corpses.

Vancouver is the battlefield in a war between myriad drug gangs, which include Hell's Angels, Big Circle Boys, United Nations, Red Scorpions, Independent Soldiers and the 14K Triad. Guns – often machineguns – are fired almost daily. "We've always been told by media experts to never admit that there is a gang war," the chief of police, Jim Chu, said last month. "Let's get serious. There is a gang war and it's brutal." Vancouver's Mayor, Gregor Robertson, confessed that the police are fighting a losing battle. Since mid-January, the city has recorded 50 gang-related shootings, 18 of them fatal. And the violence is not confined to seedy neighbourhoods. The cross-fire is happening in quiet, residential cul-de-sacs and the car parks of up-scale shopping centres. It's a suburban civil war.

Nor are hardened criminals the only victims. An attack on one gangster's car killed a 24-year-old man hired to fit it with a new stereo. In February, Nicole Alemy, 23, the wife of another gangster, was gunned down in her white Cadillac – with her four-year-old son in the back seat. On Friday, police arrested James Bacon – one of three brothers who left the United Nations gang to join the Red Scorpions, intensifying the rivalry between the two – for conspiring in the deaths of four gangsters in their flat in Surrey, south-east of Vancouver. Two innocent men were forced from the hallway into the flat and also killed. Police said they intend to make more arrests over the weekend.

As Vancouver has boomed over the past two decades, attracting wealthy immigrants from across Canada and the Pacific, so too has the illegal drugs trade. It is now the third largest industry in the province, generating between C$7bn (£3.8bn) and C$8bn a year. A young, party-loving population with liberal attitudes to drugs has created strong domestic demand, while the province's mild climate and a ready supply of well-educated horticulturalists has led to supply of a premium brand of cannabis called "BC bud", produced mostly in hydroponic "grow-ops".

The drug's superior quality – "one puff and you're anaesthetised," reported one academic – also found favour with customers in the US, encouraging an imaginative corps of smugglers. Customs agents have found shipments in church vans, hollow logs and even kayaks. One enterprising crew emulated the prisoners of Stalag Luft III, digging a 110m tunnel "under the wire". The bigger problem for Canada, though, was the return trade. The US drug distributors preferred to pay in kind, with cocaine and guns.

Many commentators think Vancouver's violence is just a skirmish on the fringe of the much larger war in Mexico, where 6,000 were murdered last year as the state tried to reassert control over territories seized by drug lords. The result has been a 50 per cent rise in the price of cocaine in Canada, and correspondingly higher profits to fight over. But not everyone is convinced. Experts at Simon Fraser University argue that the problem is home-grown, and that it's exacerbated by police efforts to bang up mob leaders. "All you do is create vacancies as you put people in jail," said Ehor Boyanowsky, an associate professor of criminology. "Suddenly there's an opportunity."

In the short term, say the academics, Vancouver's problem is one of unco-ordinated enforcement. By one count, as many as 11 different agencies, including the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and local police forces, were responsible for suppressing the drugs trade. The courts are almost as confused. Canadian justice is more tolerant than America's. No one has been successfully prosecuted for simple possession of marijuana in years, and Amsterdam-style hash cafés operate in a grey zone, only occasionally being shut down. Because of judicial leniency, officers prefer to see their targets collared in the US. The "Great Escape" gang were under surveillance on both sides of the border, but were arrested in Washington.

In the long run, many British Columbians, on both left and right, accept that legalisation and regulation are the answer. Just the sales tax on C$7bn of drugs would pay for several hospitals and schools, policing costs could be reduced, property crime by addicts to pay for their drug habits would be slashed, and the gang wars could be quickly reined in. "But the international politics are unbelievable," said Dr Rob Gordon, director of Simon Fraser's school of criminology. "The DEA [uS Drug Enforcement Administration] starts to foam at the mouth at the idea of there being a huge, legal marijuana farm just north of the border. Under George Bush, the concensus was that if Canada ever moved to exercise its economic sovereignty, they would shut the border down by searching every vehicle."

Until then, the best hope may be that one gang or another comes out on top, allowing it to impose stability, much as the Hell's Angel's bike gang used to do up to 15 or 20 years ago. Professor Boyanowsky said: "Those were the good old days."

I see there was another shooting and killing last night. :o

Also From CTV BC:

http://www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/C...ishColumbiaHome

Police name man killed in gas station shooting

Updated: Tue Apr. 07 2009 12:46:47

ctvbc.ca

Police named 24-year-old Lionel Yisheng Tan as the man shot dead in front of a gas station in southwest Vancouver on Monday night.

Tan was known to police and it appears to have been a targeted shooting related to drug activity, but police said this had not been confirmed.

His body could be seen lying on the pavement next to a silver BMW in front of a Husky gas station and convenience store on 70th Avenue near SW Marine Drive.

Witnesses reported up to 12 shots being fired in rapid succession at around 9:30 p.m. followed by a woman's screams.

Yisheng is Vancouver's 12th murder of 2009.

Almost 50 people have now been shot since the beginning of January in the Lower Mainland and Fraser Valley, and 20 have died.

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I don't understand why there is gang violence in Canada of all places.

British Columbia has a multi-billion dollar drug industry (the pot industry alone is something like $10-billion, equivalent to the entire B.C. tourism industry) focused in the Vancouver region, and naturally that comes along with gangs. As well, the ship Port of Vancouver is by far the largest port in Canada and one of the largest in the west coast of the continent. Port activity also supports and encourages gangs to grow and expand, gangs are heavily supplied with what they need through the port and by bribing port operators.

This is evident with all major port cities around the world. Just look at Hong Kong, Los Angeles, New York, etc.

With all that said, the whole Vancouver crime spur is overblown by the media. It'll end, eventually....when the situation in Mexico calms down. And just for reference, there are many cities in the United States with a much higher shooting and murder rate than Vancouver.

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I have a little list of reasons why Canada is such a hotbed for crime.

- The country is urban, and violent crime is more significant in urban areas. Therefore, the ratios will be high.

- Canada's stable economy and stable society means that small time crime can easily grow due to government maintaining the status quo.

- Canada's loose immigration policies bring in a high immigration rate, the downside of which is fast compartmentalization of people into specific groups based on habits. While somewhat egalitarian, having a closed set of distinct types in society inevitably results in the "haves vs. have nots", and gang activity flourishes with this mentality. Domestic citizens become another game-playing compartment themselves.

- Canada heavily relies on shipping, and areas of ports are very lucrative to organized crime.

- Canada is big and wide, and hiding any growing/production operations of narcotics is as simple as simple pie.

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I have a little list of reasons why Canada is such a hotbed for crime.

That's quite incorrect. Our national crime rate is quite low. But the Vancouver crime rate is higher than the national average.

- The country is urban, and violent crime is more significant in urban areas. Therefore, the ratios will be high.

The nations is far from being urban. I mean, we may have urban centres but they are just like any other urban area in the world.

- Canada's stable economy and stable society means that small time crime can easily grow due to government maintaining the status quo.

.......

- Canada's loose immigration policies bring in a high immigration rate, the downside of which is fast compartmentalization of people into specific groups based on habits. While somewhat egalitarian, having a closed set of distinct types in society inevitably results in the "haves vs. have nots", and gang activity flourishes with this mentality. Domestic citizens become another game-playing compartment themselves.

Somewhat true.

- Canada heavily relies on shipping, and areas of ports are very lucrative to organized crime.

Vancouver does, not the entire nation.

- Canada is big and wide, and hiding any growing/production operations of narcotics is as simple as simple pie.

Mostly true.

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Well I hope it ends.

The whole world is unsafe(sort of), I just hope the sensationalism of crime does not affect the global image of Canada, which is extremely good. South Africans can't stop talking about moving to a perfect life in Canada.

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Well I hope it ends.

The whole world is unsafe(sort of), I just hope the sensationalism of crime does not affect the global image of Canada, which is extremely good. South Africans can't stop talking about moving to a perfect life in Canada.

Yea and I've said before that I know of a lot of South Africans here and they are one of the few groups of immigrants that don't also complain about Canada. I am friends with one (we are in the same program at school) and he laughs when we talk about crime and safety. He's from Jo'Burg so...

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With all that said, the whole Vancouver crime spur is overblown by the media. It'll end, eventually....when the situation in Mexico calms down. And just for reference, there are many cities in the United States with a much higher shooting and murder rate than Vancouver.

Everybody's just trying to be like Ricky, Julian, and Bubbles. ;) Now somebody hand me a rum and coke. :lol:

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The news has hit Cape Town.

Bloody suburban gang war shatters Vancouver's squeaky-clean image

11 April 2009

Cape Argus

Once upon a very recent time, Vancouver had a clean, safe image. Nestled between a spectacular bay and snow-capped mountains, this Canadian city was described by The Economist as the most liveable in the world.

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The image is overblown both ways. Canada's 5 million+ cities (Vancouver, Toronto, Calgary, Edmonton and Montreal) have crime rates that are comparable to European and Australian million+ cities and considerably less than cities that are a million + in the Americas (especially Brazil, Mexico and USA). But there is crime, there are gangs and other problems.

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