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Oscar Nominations


ejaycat

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Here's the list:

Picture of the year

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), A Kennedy/Marshall Production, Kathleen Kennedy, Frank Marshall and Ceán Chaffin, Producers

“Frost/Nixon” (Universal), A Universal Pictures, Imagine Entertainment and Working Title Production,Brian Grazer, Ron Howard and Eric Fellner, Producers

“Milk” (Focus Features), A Groundswell and Jinks/Cohen Company Production, Dan Jinks and Bruce Cohen, Producers

“The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), A Mirage Enterprises and Neunte Babelsberg Film GmbH Production, Nominees to be determined

“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), A Celador Films Production,Christian Colson, Producer

Directing

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), David Fincher

“Frost/Nixon” (Universal), Ron Howard

“Milk” (Focus Features), Gus Van Sant

“The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), Stephen Daldry

“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Danny Boyle

Actor in a leading role

Richard Jenkins in “The Visitor” (Overture Films)

Frank Langella in “Frost/Nixon” (Universal)

Sean Penn in “Milk” (Focus Features)

Brad Pitt in “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.)

Mickey Rourke in “The Wrestler” (Fox Searchlight)

Actor in a supporting role

Josh Brolin in “Milk” (Focus Features)

Robert Downey Jr. in “Tropic Thunder” (DreamWorks, Distributed by DreamWorks/Paramount)

Philip Seymour Hoffman in “Doubt” (Miramax)

Heath Ledger in “The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.)

Michael Shannon in “Revolutionary Road” (DreamWorks, Distributed by Paramount Vantage)

Actress in a leading role

Anne Hathaway in “Rachel Getting Married” (Sony Pictures Classics)

Angelina Jolie in “Changeling” (Universal)

Melissa Leo in “Frozen River” (Sony Pictures Classics)

Meryl Streep in “Doubt” (Miramax)

Kate Winslet in “The Reader” (The Weinstein Company)

Actress in a supporting role

Amy Adams in “Doubt” (Miramax)

Penélope Cruz in “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” (The Weinstein Company)

Viola Davis in “Doubt” (Miramax)

Taraji P. Henson in “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.)

Marisa Tomei in “The Wrestler” (Fox Searchlight)

Animated feature film of the year

“Bolt” (Walt Disney), Chris Williams and Byron Howard

“Kung Fu Panda” (DreamWorks Animation, Distributed by Paramount), John Stevenson and Mark Osborne

“WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Andrew Stanton

Art direction

“Changeling” (Universal), Art Direction: James J. Murakami, Set Decoration: Gary Fettis

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Art Direction: Donald Graham Burt, Set Decoration: Victor J. Zolfo

“The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Art Direction: Nathan Crowley, Set Decoration: Peter Lando

“The Duchess” (Paramount Vantage, Pathé and BBC Films), Art Direction: Michael Carlin, Set Decoration: Rebecca Alleway

“Revolutionary Road” (DreamWorks, Distributed by Paramount Vantage), Art Direction: Kristi Zea, Set Decoration: Debra Schutt

Cinematography

“Changeling” (Universal), Tom Stern

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Claudio Miranda

“The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Wally Pfister

“The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), Chris Menges and Roger Deakins

“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Anthony Dod Mantle

Costume design

“Australia” (20th Century Fox), Catherine Martin

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Jacqueline West

“The Duchess” (Paramount Vantage, Pathé and BBC Films), Michael O’Connor

“Milk” (Focus Features), Danny Glicker

“Revolutionary Road” (DreamWorks, Distributed by Paramount Vantage), Albert Wolsky

Documentary feature

“The Betrayal (Nerakhoon)” (Cinema Guild), A Pandinlao Films Production, Ellen Kuras and Thavisouk Phrasavath

“Encounters at the End of the World” (THINKFilm and Image Entertainment), A Creative Differences Production, Werner Herzog and Henry Kaiser

“The Garden” A Black Valley Films Production, Scott Hamilton Kennedy

“Man on Wire” (Magnolia Pictures), A Wall to Wall Production, James Marsh and Simon Chinn

“Trouble the Water” (Zeitgeist Films), An Elsewhere Films Production, Tia Lessin and Carl Deal

Documentary short subject

“The Conscience of Nhem En” A Farallon Films Production, Steven Okazaki

“The Final Inch” A Vermilion Films Production, Irene Taylor Brodsky and Tom Grant

“Smile Pinki” A Principe Production, Megan Mylan

“The Witness - From the Balcony of Room 306” A Rock Paper Scissors Production, Adam Pertofsky and Margaret Hyde

Film editing

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Kirk Baxter and Angus Wall

“The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Lee Smith

“Frost/Nixon” (Universal), Mike Hill and Dan Hanley

“Milk” (Focus Features), Elliot Graham

“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Chris Dickens

Foreign language film of the year

“The Baader Meinhof Complex” A Constantin Film Production, Germany

“The Class” (Sony Pictures Classics), A Haut et Court Production, France

“Departures” (Regent Releasing), A Departures Film Partners Production, Japan

“Revanche” (Janus Films), A Prisma Film/Fernseh Production, Austria

“Waltz with Bashir” (Sony Pictures Classics), A Bridgit Folman Film Gang Production, Israel

Makeup

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Greg Cannom

“The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), John Caglione, Jr. and Conor O’Sullivan

“Hellboy II: The Golden Army” (Universal), Mike Elizalde and Thom Floutz

Original score

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.),Alexandre Desplat

“Defiance” (Paramount Vantage), James Newton Howard

“Milk” (Focus Features), Danny Elfman

“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), A.R. Rahman

“WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Thomas Newman

Original song

“Down to Earth” from “WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Music by Peter Gabriel and Thomas Newman, Lyric by Peter Gabriel

“Jai Ho” from “Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Music by A.R. Rahman, Lyric by Gulzar

“O Saya” from “Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Music and Lyric by A.R. Rahman andMaya Arulpragasam

Animated short film

“La Maison en Petits Cubes” A Robot Communications Production, Kunio Kato

“Lavatory - Lovestory” A Melnitsa Animation Studio and CTB Film Company Production, Konstantin Bronzit

“Oktapodi” (Talantis Films) A Gobelins, L’école de l’image Production, Emud Mokhberi and Thierry Marchand

“Presto” (Walt Disney) A Pixar Animation Studios Production, Doug Sweetland

“This Way Up”, A Nexus Production, Alan Smith and Adam Foulkes

Live action short film

“Auf der Strecke (On the Line)” (Hamburg Shortfilmagency), An Academy of Media Arts Cologne Production, Reto Caffi

“Manon on the Asphalt” (La Luna Productions), A La Luna Production, Elizabeth Marre and Olivier Pont

“New Boy” (Network Ireland Television), A Zanzibar Films Production, Steph Green and Tamara Anghie

“The Pig” An M & M Production, Tivi Magnusson and Dorte Høgh

“Spielzeugland (Toyland)” A Mephisto Film Production, Jochen Alexander Freydank

Sound editing

“The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Richard King

“Iron Man” (Paramount and Marvel Entertainment), Frank Eulner and Christopher Boyes

“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Tom Sayers

“WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Ben Burtt and Matthew Wood

“Wanted” (Universal),Wylie Stateman

Sound mixing

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), David Parker, Michael Semanick, Ren Klyce and Mark Weingarten

“The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Lora Hirschberg, Gary Rizzo and Ed Novick

“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Ian Tapp, Richard Pryke and Resul Pookutty

“WALL-E” (Walt Disney),Tom Myers, Michael Semanick and Ben Burtt

“Wanted” (Universal), Chris Jenkins, Frank A. Montaño and Petr Forejt

Visual effects

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Eric Barba, Steve Preeg, Burt Dalton and Craig Barron

“The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Nick Davis, Chris Corbould, Tim Webber and Paul Franklin

“Iron Man” (Paramount and Marvel Entertainment), John Nelson, Ben Snow, Dan Sudick and Shane Mahan

Adapted screenplay

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Screenplay by Eric Roth, Screen story by Eric Roth and Robin Swicord

“Doubt” (Miramax), Written by John Patrick Shanley

“Frost/Nixon” (Universal), Screenplay by Peter Morgan

“The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), Screenplay by David Hare

“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Screenplay by Simon Beaufoy

Original screenplay

“Frozen River” (Sony Pictures Classics), Written by Courtney Hunt

“Happy-Go-Lucky” (Miramax), Written by Mike Leigh

“In Bruges” (Focus Features), Written by Martin McDonagh

“Milk” (Focus Features), Written by Dustin Lance Black

“WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Screenplay by Andrew Stanton, Jim Reardon, Original story by Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter

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My choices for main categories, donated by '***'

Who I think will win '**'

Picture of the year

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button **

Frost/Nixon

Milk

The Reader

Slumdog Millionaire ***

Directing

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button - David Fincher **

Frost/Nixon - Ron Howard

Milk - Gus Van Sant

The Reader - Stephen Daldry

Slumdog Millionaire - Danny Boyle ***

Actor in a leading role

Richard Jenkins in The Visitor

Frank Langellain in Frost/Nixon

Sean Penn in Milk

Brad Pitt in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Mickey Rourke in The Wrestler ***, **

Actor in a supporting role

Josh Brolin in Milk

Robert Downey Jr. in Tropic Thunder

Philip Seymour Hoffman in Doubt

Heath Ledger in The Dark Knight **

Michael Shannon in Revolutionary Road ***

Actress in a leading role

Anne Hathaway in Rachel Getting Married

Angelina Jolie in Changeling

Melissa Leo in Frozen River

Meryl Streep in Doubt **

Kate Winslet in The Reader ***

Actress in a supporting role

Amy Adams in Doubt

Penélope Cruz in Vicky Cristina Barcelona ***, **

Viola Davis in Doubt

Taraji P. Henson in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Marisa Tomei in The Wrestler

---'

Revolutionary Road seems to have been lost with Oscar Voters. I don't see Kate Winslet carrying the Oscar for 'The Reader', unfortunately. I think the Oscars are in love with the 'Curious Case of Benjamin Button', up for 13 awards; so I see it taking Best Picture, though want 'Slumdog' to win. Best Direction is a tough field, I could see it going to Boyle, Van Sant or Fincher.

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My guess is, that Best Picture is between "Slumdog" and "Benjamin Button." Slumdog got 10 nominations, pretty good! Of the Best Picture nominations, I've only so far seen "Slumdog" and "Milk." I think Slumdog should win.

I'm experiencing some Schadenfreude that "Gran Torino" didn't get ANY nominations, haha!

Looking at the Best Costume category, it's funny to me that more movies set anywhere in the last half of the 20th Century are now getting recognized for their "costumes." To think "Milk," a movie set in the 1970s, the decade of my childhood, is a "period" film. God I'm getting old!

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Just now noticed that the Best Picture nominees and Best Director nominees match up. That usually doesn't happen, there's usually one or 2 films that don't match up. But this did happen a few years ago also.

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  • 1 month later...

I am very glad that the short movie "Spielzeugland" (Toyland) won.

The movie is about two german small boys in 1942 - one jew the other one not a jew - one day the jewish boy and his family get the order to get deported - the mother of the non jewish boy don't want to tell her son the truth and therewith she tells him a white lie: his friend and his family are going to Toyland...

Her boy wants to go to Toyland, too and runs with his small suitcase to the railway station, where his friends family should have go to to get deported - when his mother recognises that he dissappeared she runs in panic to this station and tells the SS-men that her boy is among the people in the cattle rail car - the waggons are open - she can't find her boy in one of the waggons, but the family of her sons friend - in this situation she and the parents of her sons friend make a decision...

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Wow, all good news at the top of the BBC News site this morning! British Oscar successes top the bill, UK man flying back from Guantanamo, and one of our banks is going to start lending again. Is the recession finally over? :lol:

I still, shamefully, haven't seen Slumdog yet.

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I liked the show, it went really fast (for an Oscar show). It was smart to group the categories together and have one presenter or group of presenters present more than one category; it saved time by not having to introduce yet another presenter and have them walk onto the stage. I don't know why they hadn't thought of this before. I thought the set looked cool too.

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I haven't seen it yet but Mark Kermode, the film critic for the BBC, said he found having a number of presenters each presenting their case for the best actor (or whatever) pretty cringeworthy!

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Well,I thought Hugh Jackman was made to work a bit harder at hosting than some of his more recent predecessors with all that singing,dancing and leaping about he had to do but I think he managed to pull it off (although his singing left a bit to be desired)! :lol:

Plusses:

1.Beyonce in the opening sequence tribute to classic Hollywood musicals.I thought she was spot on and amazingly verstile.

2. Kate Winslet's acceptance speech which just about managed to show her excitement and emotion without going into cringeworthy meltdown as she did at the Globes.

3. Sophia Loren...74 years old and still looking fantastic!

Minusses (just one):

1. The presenters who mispronounced 'SpielzeugLand' and then giggled.Showed disrespect to Jochen Alexander Freydank and his film IMO! :angry:

Surprises:

Sean Penn's award for 'Milk'. All the other awards seemed to go with prediction!

Noteworthy Record:

Heath Ledger's award for the Dark Knight.I think this is only the 2nd time in Oscar history that an award has been presented posthumously.(The first time being Peter Finch's award in 1978). B)

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Surprises:

Sean Penn's award for 'Milk'. All the other awards seemed to go with prediction!

Noteworthy Record:

Heath Ledger's award for the Dark Knight.I think this is only the 2nd time in Oscar history that an award has been presented posthumously.(The first time being Peter Finch's award in 1978). B)

Glad to see Sean Penn get it - I thought he was just simply outstanding in Milk - he caught all the nuances right.

It's interesting, that both posthumous awards went to Aussies. Hmmmm.

:huh:

I only watched the opening parts - thought Jackman did pretty well in his opening sequence. He's a great showman!

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I'm happy that Kate Winslet finally won an Oscar. She was way overdue.

I wanted Rourke to win Best Actor but Penn was a good winner as well but he had already won an Oscar so I wanted the wealth to be spread out.

And I hated Beyonce's peformance. Why the hell does she have to be involved in everything? This isn't the Grammy Awards and she's very delusional claiming she'll win an Oscar in the future. LOL!! Isn't anyone else damn sick of her yet?

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Glad to see Sean Penn get it - I thought he was just simply outstanding in Milk - he caught all the nuances right.

I don't know if Penn's award marks any significant turnaround towards gay issues by Hollywood following the snub to 'Brokeback Mountain' a couple of years ago.I'm reminded that Tom Hanks received an award for playing a gay character in 'Philadelphia' back in the 90s but it didn't result in any real change in attitudes.I guess that will probably only be confirmed when a film like 'Brokeback Mountain' or 'Milk' receives the Best Film award??

It's interesting, that both posthumous awards went to Aussies. Hmmmm.:huh:

Yes,Aussie actors seem to have cornered the market in receiving posthumous awards.I'm sure it's just coincidence? ;)

I only watched the opening parts - thought Jackman did pretty well in his opening sequence. He's a great showman!

Didn't realise he could sing and dance.He came across to me as quite a nice guy!

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The "Oscars" or the "Academy Awards" are the biggest waste of time in the cinematic world. If you really want to know what the best pictures or performances or screenplays were, pay attention to the critics circles and the like. The Academy Awards are nothing but a giant industry backslapping from themselves to themselves. A big advertisement for "Hollywood", the corporation. It's nauseating. It's one giant act of Hollywood collectively kissing each others asses and sucking each others dicks. A huge popularity contest. 2006's award of "Best Picture" going to "Crash" over "Brokeback Mountain" should be proof enough. As a matter of fact, the "AMPAS" was a joke to begin with, founded by Louis B Mayer who said:

"I found that the best way to handle [moviemakers] was to hang medals all over them, If I got them cups and awards they'd kill themselves to produce what I wanted. That's why the Academy Award was created."

Jackman was horrible. I thought this guy could sing? He could have fooled me. And the new format of having five ex-winners come out on stage and somberly praise of each of the nominees was vomit inducing. I hope every seat had a barf bag in a seat back pocket. Ratings this year were only 6% higher than last year, the lowest rated ever. People are bored. At least the Academy got it's guilt trip in gear and gave Heath Ledger the award he should have won in 2006 which instead went to Philip Seymour Hoffman's trite display of mimicry. A bit late on the uptake though, eh Hollywood? Idiots.

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The "Oscars" or the "Academy Awards" are the biggest waste of time in the cinematic world. If you really want to know what the best pictures or performances or screenplays were, pay attention to the critics circles and the like. The Academy Awards are nothing but a giant industry backslapping from themselves to themselves. A big advertisement for "Hollywood", the corporation. It's nauseating. It's one giant act of Hollywood collectively kissing each others asses and sucking each others dicks. A huge popularity contest. 2006's award of "Best Picture" going to "Crash" over "Brokeback Mountain" should be proof enough. As a matter of fact, the "AMPAS" was a joke to begin with, founded by Louis B Mayer who said:

"I found that the best way to handle [moviemakers] was to hang medals all over them, If I got them cups and awards they'd kill themselves to produce what I wanted. That's why the Academy Award was created."

Jackman was horrible. I thought this guy could sing? He could have fooled me. And the new format of having five ex-winners come out on stage and somberly praise of each of the nominees was vomit inducing. I hope every seat had a barf bag in a seat back pocket. Ratings this year were only 6% higher than last year, the lowest rated ever. People are bored. At least the Academy got it's guilt trip in gear and gave Heath Ledger the award he should have won in 2006 which instead went to Philip Seymour Hoffman's trite display of mimicry. A bit late on the uptake though, eh Hollywood? Idiots.

Well yea, there have been lots of bad awards, many have been very political. Along with Brokeback Mountain, they also refuse to honour Palestinian/Israeli movies, over the past couple of years there has been 2 that should have won best foreign language and both came up empty.

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It's all about opinions. :P And aren't all award ceremonies backslapping fests?

No. It's one thing to have Hollywood backslap itself, it's another to have a critics circle or other similar disinterested organization make their picks.

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Well that's the thing; EVERYONE'S a critic. But the Oscars are about different branches of the "Hollywood" film industry honoring every branch of the Hollywood film industry. It's about peers honoring their peers. But I also do believe that often, politics and sentiment rule the Oscars.

Going back to the Oscars, although I thought Kate Winslet was good in "The Reader," I still wanted Meryl Streep to win for "Doubt." I thought she was excellent in that film and thought it was a better film.

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I don't know if Penn's award marks any significant turnaround towards gay issues by Hollywood following the snub to 'Brokeback Mountain' a couple of years ago.I'm reminded that Tom Hanks received an award for playing a gay character in 'Philadelphia' back in the 90s but it didn't result in any real change in attitudes.I guess that will probably only be confirmed when a film like 'Brokeback Mountain' or 'Milk' receives the Best Film award??

I actually didn't think Hanks' Oscar for "Philadelphia" was ground-breaking; in the 1980s, William Hurt won Best Actor for playing a gay character in "Kiss of the Spider Woman." But both those characters were stereotypical; William Hurt's character was effeminate and Tom Hanks' character was dying of AIDS, and there were no sex scenes, as I recall.

I'm gay and I thought "Brokeback Mountain" was BORING. If anything that movie seems to have appealed more to straight women, and I'm not surprised, considering the novella it's based on was written by a straight woman.

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