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Maybe, the Football world needs to get together and start a new Fifa.

You do realize that this essentially what others, including myself, have already said on this thread. Any original insights from you?

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We've also made it out of the knock-out round more recently.

Tony if I see you say England should be given the hosting rights one more time I will throw my computer. This is really getting old pal. There's nothing wrong with Russia hosting in 2018 and 2022 shou

Someone needs to sue FIFA over this mess. Rivals bidders, European leagues and clubs, TV networks, sponsors, players...all are being mucked about because of FIFA's inability to think properly. The bi

Well, the farce is finally over! FIFA has officially stripped Qatar of... the 2021 Confederation Cup. Because they finally realized it's too bloody hot during the summer and that moving the tournament to the winter is impractical. Now if only they had thought of that a couple of years earlier.

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Fifa don't care. As long as Fifa gets the money, nothing else matters in Fifa's mind. We either live with it, or the Football world does something about it.

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Well, the farce is finally over! FIFA has officially stripped Qatar of... the 2021 Confederation Cup. Because they finally realized it's too bloody hot during the summer and that moving the tournament to the winter is impractical. Now if only they had thought of that a couple of years earlier.

The thing was, no one really took the Khatar bid seriously. That was the tragedy of it. And what's even worse, most of the 14 yutzes who voted for Khatar won't even be around in 7 years to "enjoy" the mess they created. Blame it all on Mike Lee for creating a winning campaign for those Bedouins.

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Exactly, which makes Qatar's bid even more corrupt. No one in their right mind gave Qatar any chance, then they host? Fifa keep digging a deeper and deeper hole.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Qatar World Cup: Final on December 18, 2022

(CNN)The 2022 World Cup final in Qatar will be held on December 18 -- the Gulf state's national day.

The decision was made by FIFA at an executive meeting in Zurich, Switzerland on Thursday.

FIFA, world football's global governing body, decided to move the tournament to the Qatari winter following fears over the intense summer temperatures.

CNN

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They managed to piss off both North American and European broadcasters, and yet this is still probably the most reasonable timeframe to hold the tournament in such an unreasonable venue. I'm almost tempted to say "well done, FIFA". Almost.

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Slaves Forced to Run Marathon Shoeless in Qatar

In an effort to break a Guinness World Record, a Qatari sports club reportedly bused in migrant workers and forced them to run in a state-sponsored “megamarathon” in Doha last Friday.

Many of the workers were said to have run the race in flip-flops and jeans and, according to Doha News, some laborers “tried to leave but were turned back and were yelled at that they need to stay and cross the line.”

According to the race’s official site, the marathon was created to illustrate a “decisive response to the campaign waged by the sector of envious haters on the success of Qatar to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, and to their false allegations of persecution of workers and residents in our beloved country.”

.http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/04/02/slaves-to-run-shoeless-in-qatar.html

Edited by Rob.
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Slaves Forced to Run Marathon Shoeless in Qatar

In an effort to break a Guinness World Record, a Qatari sports club reportedly bused in migrant workers and forced them to run in a state-sponsored “megamarathon” in Doha last Friday.

Many of the workers were said to have run the race in flip-flops and jeans and, according to Doha News, some laborers “tried to leave but were turned back and were yelled at that they need to stay and cross the line.”

According to the race’s official site, the marathon was created to illustrate a “decisive response to the campaign waged by the sector of envious haters on the success of Qatar to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, and to their false allegations of persecution of workers and residents in our beloved country.”

.http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/04/02/slaves-to-run-shoeless-in-qatar.html

Vile, despicable place. I don't even like the idea of flying via Doha.

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Report: Sepp Blatter Too Afraid Of The FBI To Enter The United States

Slavery-enabler Sepp Blatter might actually be facing consequences for how FIFA awarded the 2018 and 2022 World Cup bids to Russia and Qatar. ESPN’s investigative newsmagazine show, E:60, debuted an hour-long documentary on Blatter tonight, and reports that he is so fearful of an FBI investigation into bribery and corruption during the bidding process that he has decided not to step foot on U.S. soil:

http://screamer.deadspin.com/report-sepp-blatter-too-afraid-of-the-fbi-to-enter-the-1704086341

absolutely delicious.

(even better was the commenter who said "Luckily for Blatter, all he needs to do to avoid U.S. surveillance is stay out of the country.")

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Fifa to investigate arrest of BBC news team in Qatar

Team was on official visit to inspect migrant workers’ accommodation after outcry over conditions for those building 2022 World Cup stadiums.

Football’s governing body, Fifa, has launched an investigation after a BBC news team was arrested in Qatar while reporting on the plight of migrant workers building stadiums for the 2022 World Cup.

The four-strong crew had been invited by the Qatari’s prime minister’s office on an official tour of new accommodation for construction workers. It was part of a public relations drive in the wake of an international outcry over the slave-like conditions for workers exposed by a Guardian investigation.

But despite official permission to report in Qatar, the crew were arrested by the security services, interrogated and jailed for two days before being released without charge.

The Qatari government defended the arrests and accused the BBC crew of trespassing.

Fifa, which has been repeatedly criticised for the way Qatar won the bid to host the 2022 World Cup, was helping to run the tour. It said it was investigating the arrests. “Any instance relating to an apparent restriction of press freedom is of concern to Fifa and will be looked into with the seriousness it deserves,” it said in a statement.

The BBC’s Middle East correspondent, Mark Lobel, was one of those detained, along with his cameraman, a driver and translator.

Speaking about his ordeal, Lobel said his interrogators never explained why he had been detained but showed him surveillance photographs of his movements in Qatar. “They had actually photographed my every move since I arrived,” Lobel told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme.

After their release, members of the team were allowed to take part in the official tour of a migrant accommodation block but their equipment remained confiscated and Qatar has offered no explanation or apology for the arrests.

“We are fine,” Lobel said. “The worrying sign of this is that it might be a crackdown on the media to deal with the problem at the same time that other parts of the government are trying to change their image.”

In an article for BBC News, he added: “Whatever the explanation, Qatar’s Jekyll-and-Hyde approach to journalism has been exposed by the spotlight that has been thrown on it after winning the World Cup bid.”

Qatar’s head of communications, Saif al-Thani, said the BBC crew were arrested after departing from an official tour. He said: “We gave the reporters free rein to interview whomever they chose and to roam unaccompanied in the labour villages.

“Perhaps anticipating that the government would not provide this sort of access, the BBC crew decided to do their own site visits and interviews in the days leading up to the planned tour. In doing so, they trespassed on private property, which is against the law in Qatar just as it is in most countries. Security forces were called and the BBC crew was detained.”

No apology was issued, but Thani added: “The problems that the BBC reporter and his crew experienced could have been avoided if they had chosen to join the other journalists on the press tour. They would have been able to visit – in broad daylight – the very camps they tried to break into at night. Reporters from the Associated Press, AFP, the Guardian and Le Monde have filed stories on what they saw and heard in Qatar, and we invite interested readers to review their reports, which are available online.”

“By trespassing on private property and running afoul of Qatari laws, the BBC reporter made himself the story. We sincerely hope that this was not his intention. Moreover, we deeply regret that he was unable to report the real story, which is that the government and the private sector are making significant progress in efforts to improve the lives and the labour conditions of guest workers in Qatar.”

Human Rights Watch, which has highlighted Qatar’s poor record on labour conditions, described the arrests as “jaw-droppingly awful PR”. It pointed out that last week a German television crew was also arrested on a tour of Qatar.

HRW Gulf researcher Nicholas McGeehan said: “Qatar put itself in the harshest of spotlights when it won the right to host 2022 and this is not the way to deal with the inevitable press attention. If it wants to put an end to media criticism, it needs to make some serious reforms to its labour system. Claiming that the arrest and intimidation of BBC journalists was legitimate on account of their “trespassing” is probably the lowest point so far in a dismal series of PR disasters.”

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/may/18/fifa-to-investigate-arrest-of-bbc-news-team-in-qatar

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Once you've been accused of killing more people than the 9/11 attacks, does arresting a few reporters really harm your reputation?

Very much so, actually. We all have a pretty good idea how these migrant workers from other countries get treated when they come to Qatar, even if it's false pretenses that get them there. If the Qataris are now going out and arresting and detaining journalists, how's that going to look for other journalists that might visit the country. Or fans who would attend the World Cup. Not good.

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I normally try and defend developing countries over huan rights and environmental issues because western societies tend to compare developing countries to modern first world countries as opposed to where they were at a similar period in their own histories. China is currently a smoggy mess, but the USA and the UK were also polluted and miserable when they were the factories of the world.

The Qatari worker issue really is indefensible, though. Something like a dozen to two dozen people died digging the Thames Tunnel (the world's first underwater tunnel) in the 1860's. About a half dozen people died building the Empire State Building. Twenty seven people died building the Brooklyn Bridge, in part due to a lack of awareness about decompression sickness.

But for thousands of workers to be dying building stadiums and housing is inexplicable, and not even comparable to the projects of a century (or two) ago in western societies. 3,500 deaths is likely more than the total number of Chinese deaths building all of the western railroads in the United States with similarly racially-stigmatized Asian workers in the 1860's and 1870's. When you compare the scope of construction between the two and safety equipment available today vs back then, that's astounding. It can't even be defended on the basis of heat: the western USA is full of deserts too, and it was much harder to get fresh water into Death Valley in the 1860's than it is to Qatar today.

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I cannot find the link anymore but there was an article about two months or so ago that offered a solution to the whole Qatar World Cup mess, especially with the tournament being moved to the winter months. It centered on two points.

First, while FIFA can mandate clubs release players for their national teams, FIFA cannot mandate which players get chosen. In protest, European powerhouses along with the likes of Mexico, Brazil, and the U.S. should select "B teams" most likely under 20 squads to send to the World Cup.

Second, get a number of big time billionaire sports team owners such as Mark Cuban, Jerry Jones, Paul Allen, to organize a one-time rival tournament with the top players promising them nice paychecks, more than they could receive even as a member of a World Cup championship team. FIFA and Blatter would go insane, but really what could they do, ban powerful UEFA team from competition. Like I said before, it's a lot easier to suspend a federation such as Myanmar than it is to go after one of the big boys.

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There's no need to send a U-21 team to the World Cup at all, since teams have to qualify for the tournament. If Germany does not want to take part in the World Cup, they can simply field a terrible team in the qualification matches and thus fail to qualify.

The problem is that the players, coaches, FA officials, etc have their livelihoods based on the performance of the team in the World Cup, so they don't want to skip the tournament. And if the politicians of a country order the coaches and officials to tank the tournament, then FIFA can suspend them on the grounds of political interference in football.

The only way for FIFA to really be hurt by a boycott is for fans and sponsors to do the boycotting.

Edited by Nacre
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There's no need to send a U-21 team to the World Cup at all, since teams have to qualify for the tournament. If Germany does not want to take part in the World Cup, they can simply field a terrible team in the qualification matches and thus fail to qualify.

The problem is that the players, coaches, FA officials, etc have their livelihoods based on the performance of the team in the World Cup, so they don't want to skip the tournament. And if the politicians of a country order the coaches and officials to tank the tournament, then FIFA can suspend them on the grounds of political interference in football.

The only way for FIFA to really be hurt by a boycott is for fans and sponsors to do the boycotting.

FIFA would not suspend the likes of Germany, England, Brazil, etc. on political grounds. Maybe a public scolding and a fine, but FIFA knows where the bread and butter comes from.

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