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I HOPE they don't take 2022 away from Qatar. That would be so unfair ... considering I already have made alternate plans to go to Antartica during that time period.

It would be very unfair.. to deprive us all from watching and enjoying this slowly developing train wreck of a decision.

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He also alluded, during the interview, to political pressures from both France and Germany prior to the votes .

He mentions a meeting Platini had with Sarkozy, then French president, at the Elysée palace where the the emir of Qatar was also present.

Seems to me 'Splatter' is trying to get rid of a possible rival prior to next year's election at FIFA whilst trying to distance himself from those who voted for Qatar.

Very devious!

But then again, what do you expect?

It is well known Platini voted for Qatar. Beckenbauer is thought to have voted for the USA though.

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Qatar World Cup: '$5m payments to officials' corruption claim

Fifa is facing fresh allegations of corruption over its controversial decision to award the 2022 World Cup to Qatar.

The Sunday Times has obtained millions of secret documents - emails, letters and bank transfers - which it alleges are proof that the disgraced Qatari football official Mohamed Bin Hammam made payments totalling $5m to football officials in return for their support for the Qatar bid.

Qatar 2022 and Bin Hammam have always strenuously denied the former Fifa vice president actively lobbied on their behalf in the run up to the vote in December 2010.

But, according to emails obtained by the Sunday Times and seen by the BBC, it is now clear that Bin Hammam, 65, was lobbying on his country's behalf at least a year before the decision.

The documents also show how Bin Hammam was making payments direct to football officials in Africa to allegedly buy their support for Qatar in the contest.

Qatar strongly deny any wrongdoing and insist that Bin Hammam never had any official role supporting the bid and always acted independently from the Qatar 2022 campaign.

When approached by the Sunday Times to respond to their claims, Bin Hammam's son Hamad Al Abdulla declined to comment on his behalf.

Although the vast majority of the officials did not have a vote, the Sunday Times alleges Bin Hammam's strategy was to win a groundswell of support for the Qatari bid which would then influence the four African Fifa executive committee members who were able to take part in the election.

The Sunday Times also alleges that it has documents which prove Bin Hammam paid 305,000 Euros (£250,000) to cover the legal expenses of another former Fifa executive committee member from Oceania, Reynald Temari.

Temarii, from Tahiti, was unable to vote in the contest as he had already been suspended by Fifa after he was caught out by a Sunday Times sting asking bogus American bid officials for money in return for his support.

But the paper now alleges that Bin Hammam provided him with financial assistance to allow him to appeal against the Fifa suspension, delaying his removal from the executive committee and blocking his deputy David Chung from voting in the 2022 election.

The paper claims that had Chung been allowed to vote he would have supported Qatar's rivals Australia. Instead there was no representative from Oceania allowed to vote, a decision which may have influenced the outcome in Qatar's favour.

The paper also makes fresh allegations about the relationship between Bin Hammam and his disgraced Fifa ally Jack Warner, from Trinidad.

Although Warner was forced to resign as a Fifa vice president in 2011, after it was proved he helped Bin Hammam bribe Caribbean football officials in return for their support in his bid to oust the long standing Fifa president Sepp Blatter, the paper says it has evidence which shows more than $1.6m was paid by Bin Hammam to Warner, including $450,000 in the period before the vote.

The new allegations will place Fifa under fresh pressure to re-run the vote for the 2022 World Cup, which was held in conjunction with the vote for the 2018 tournament, in which England were eliminated in the first round with just two votes.

Fifa's chief investigator Michael Garcia is already conducting a long-running inquiry into allegations of corruption and wrongdoing during the 2018/22 decisions. He is due to meet senior officials from the Qatar 2022 organising committee in Oman on Monday.

But that meeting may now have to be postponed in light of the Sunday Times revelations which have raised important new questions about the link between Bin Hammam and the successful Qatari World Cup campaign.

Source

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Just seen this on the Beeb. I know the Telegraph had 'revelations' a while back but this looks a million times more serious - looks like they've got the first cold, hard EVIDENCE of corruption if true. Could be the beginning of the end for that little farce.

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So, to get this clear, the most serious revelation is that Qatar essentially paid $400k to block a vote that would have gone to Australia 2022.

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Not just once - Multiple times!

http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/football/27652181

Qatar World Cup: '$5m payments to officials' corruption claim

Fifa is facing fresh allegations of corruption over its controversial decision to award the 2022 World Cup to Qatar.

The Sunday Times has obtained millions of secret documents - emails, letters and bank transfers - which it alleges are proof that the disgraced Qatari football official Mohamed Bin Hammam made payments totalling $5m to football officials in return for their support for the Qatar bid.

Qatar 2022 and Bin Hammam have always strenuously denied the former Fifa vice-president actively lobbied on their behalf in the run-up to the vote in December 2010.

But, according to emails obtained by the Sunday Times and seen by the BBC, it is now clear that Bin Hammam, 65, was lobbying on his country's behalf at least a year before the decision.

The documents also show how Bin Hammam was making payments direct to football officials in Africa to allegedly buy their support for Qatar in the contest.

Qatar strongly deny any wrongdoing and insist that Bin Hammam never had any official role supporting the bid and always acted independently from the Qatar 2022 campaign.

When approached by the Sunday Times to respond to their claims, Bin Hammam's son Hamad Al Abdulla declined to comment on his behalf.

Although the vast majority of the officials did not have a vote, the Sunday Times alleges Bin Hammam's strategy was to win a groundswell of support for the Qatari bid which would then influence the four African Fifa executive committee members who were able to take part in the election.

The Sunday Times also alleges that it has documents which prove Bin Hammam paid 305,000 Euros (£250,000) to cover the legal expenses of another former Fifa executive committee member from Oceania, Reynald Temarii.

Temarii, from Tahiti, was unable to vote in the contest as he had already been suspended by Fifa after he was caught out by a Sunday Times sting asking bogus American bid officials for money in return for his support.

But the paper now alleges that Bin Hammam provided him with financial assistance to allow him to appeal against the Fifa suspension, delaying his removal from the executive committee and blocking his deputy David Chung from voting in the 2022 election.

The paper claims that had Chung been allowed to vote he would have supported Qatar's rivals Australia. Instead there was no representative from Oceania allowed to vote, a decision which may have influenced the outcome in Qatar's favour.

The paper also makes fresh allegations about the relationship between Bin Hammam and his disgraced Fifa ally Jack Warner, from Trinidad.

Although Warner was forced to resign as a Fifa vice-president in 2011, after it was proved he helped Bin Hammam bribe Caribbean football officials in return for their support in his bid to oust the long-standing Fifa president Sepp Blatter, the paper says it has evidence which shows more than $1.6m was paid by Bin Hammam to Warner, including $450,000 in the period before the vote.

The new allegations will place Fifa under fresh pressure to re-run the vote for the 2022 World Cup, which was held in conjunction with the vote for the 2018 tournament, in which England were eliminated in the first round with just two votes.

Fifa's chief investigator Michael Garcia is already conducting a long-running inquiry into allegations of corruption and wrongdoing during the 2018/22 decisions. He is due to meet senior officials from the Qatar 2022 organising committee in Oman on Monday.

But that meeting may now have to be postponed in light of the Sunday Times revelations which have raised important new questions about the link between Bin Hammam and the successful Qatari World Cup campaign.

http://www.foxsports.com.au/football/former-fifa-official-accused-of-buying-support-for-qatars-2022-world-cup-bid-says-report/story-e6frf423-1226938817199

A FORMER member of FIFA's executive committee was accused of making payments totalling $5 million to senior football officials in return for support for Qatar's successful bid for the 2022 World Cup.

British newspaper The Sunday Times said it has obtained millions of secret documents proving that Mohamed Bin Hammam, a Qatari who used to be FIFA vice president, was lobbying on his country's behalf ahead of the vote in December 2010.

Under a front-page headline of “Plot to buy the World Cup,” the newspaper alleged that Bin Hammam made dozens of payments to top football officials in Africa as well as Reynald Temarii and Jack Warner, the former FIFA executive committee members for Oceania and CONCACAF.

The allegations come less than two weeks before the start of the World Cup in Brazil and bring fresh scrutiny on the 2010 vote, which awarded football's biggest tournament to the tiny desert state and currently is under investigation by FIFA's independent ethics prosecutor.

The Sunday Times said that Bin Hamman declined to respond to the allegations and that members of Qatar's bid committee denied any link to the former FIFA official, saying he played no secret role in their campaign.

Qatari organisers did not immediately respond to The Associated Press' request for comment.

Bin Hammam, one of the most controversial figures in FIFA's recent history, is no longer a committee member of world football's governing body after being caught up in a corruption scandal surrounding his failed campaign for its presidency in 2011.

The Sunday Times is alleging, however, that he exploited his position at the heart of FIFA when he was an executive committee member to help to secure votes from key members of its 24-man ruling committee that helped Qatar win the right to host the World Cup. Qatar defeated bids from the United States, Japan, South Korea and Australia.

According to the newspaper, Bin Hammam used 10 slush funds controlled by his private company and cash handouts to make dozens of payments of up to $200,000 into accounts controlled by the presidents of 30 African football associations who influenced how the continent's four executive members would vote. He also allegedly hosted lavish junkets for these African officials at which he handed out almost $400,000 in cash.

The newspaper says the documents show that Bin Hammam paid out at least 305,000 euros ($415,000) in legal and private detective fees for Temarii after he was suspended for telling undercover reporters that he had been offered $12 million for his vote. Bin Hammam's help allowed him to appeal the suspension and prevent his planned replacement from voting for Australia in the vote, the Sunday Times claimed.

Bin Hammam is also accused of funnelling more than $1.6 million directly into bank accounts controlled by Warner, including $450,000 before the vote. Warner resigned from football duties, including his 28-year membership of FIFA's committee, in June 2011 to avoid investigation in a bribery scandal linked to Bin Hammam's campaign for FIFA president.

The Sunday Times also said Bin Hammam paid $800,000 to the Ivory Coast FA, whose executive committee member Jacques Anouma agreed to “push very hard the bid of Qatar,” and signed off on two payments of $400,000 each to the federations of two other voters.

If true - give it to America (as the runner up) or if need be re-run the vote.

I'm not sure Australia would want to bid again - we only got 1 vote.

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It won't be. For bad or worse, this clusterfock is going to be in the Qatari desert and it will mutilate 2 years+ of the footballing calender.

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FIFA vice-president Jim Boyce say he would support a re-vote according to the BBC.

Would love that. But a such process would have to start quite soon to give candidates time for preparations.

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Sept Blatter is a man with no shame. While he seeks another term, Fifa's credibility is in complete tatters. If this was any other body, he'd have been forced out long ago. Yet, he stays in post, and is able to seek re-election.

When I type Sepp Blatter into Google, a list of suggestions appears. It's no great surprise 'Sepp Blatter corrupt' is the first suggestion. You couldn't make it up. Then again, it's Fifa, so you probably can.

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It won't be. For bad or worse, this clusterfock is going to be in the Qatari desert and it will mutilate 2 years+ of the footballing calender.

I fully expect Qatar to be stripped of the staging of the 2022 world cup. When you hear 'it was a mistake' to go to Qatar, and the establishment of a major ethics inquiry, it seems to me the momentum is building for a revote. A senior vice president of fifa, James Boyce, has told the BBC if the ethics inquiry finds wrong doing, which now seems likely, he will support a revote. As I say, momentum building. It is quite clear if fifa can get out of this crisis it will do so - with Qatar being the fall guy, while Fifa's top brass live on.

Edited by Michelle

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So, to get this clear, the most serious revelation is that Qatar essentially paid $400k to block a vote that would have gone to Australia 2022.

Which ultimately would not have changed the vote. But any wrong doing will be jumped upon. Fifa no longer want Qatar hosting. Any infraction will be enough. Popcorn on standby, while this car crash plays out.

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Just heard that the Times have obtained documentation of bank transfers. Evidence of wrongdoing doesn't come much more concrete if true :o

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I wouldn't be surprised if this evidence is coming right from the Blatter team to

a) create an immediate smokescreen to cover any problems with this year's WC,

B) discredit Platini as Qatar supporter and possible Blatter opponent

c) find an excuse to strip Qatar off hosting eventually and claiming public pressure and ethics for that turnaround

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I fully expect Qatar to be stripped of the staging of the 2022 world cup. When you hear 'it was a mistake' to go to Qatar, and the establishment of a major ethics inquiry, it seems to me the momentum is building for a revote. A senior vice president of fifa, James Boyce, has told the BBC if the ethics inquiry finds wrong doing, which now seems likely, he will support a revote. As I say, momentum building. It is quite clear if fifa can get out of this crisis it will do so - with Qatar being the fall guy, while Fifa's top brass live on.

The consequences of this would be immense. Including probably having to payoff Qatar. I would love to see France, Germany, the USA or Japan step in and host a proper World Cup. But I just cannot see a legal scenario where this wouldn't cost FIFA 9 figures and enormous legal costs.

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Well, they have a price to pay for their dumbness. Could start by collecting money from the corrupt officials....

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Including probably having to payoff Qatar.

If Qatar is found guilty of buying votes, FIFA would in no way have to payoff Qatar should they strip them of the World Cup.

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If Qatar is found guilty of buying votes, FIFA would in no way have to payoff Qatar should they strip them of the World Cup.

If there is no mechanism for the removal of a World Cup due to corruption, than yes FIFA would be in a very delicate legal position. SLC wasn't removed as a host when bribery was found, its hard to imagine, unless written into either the bidding or hosting agreements. Unless it specifically states that allegations of bribery/corruption will lead to removal of competition/hosting, FIFA has very little to stand on. And if it does, than Qatar's corruption will directly implicate Spain/Portugal because of the much rumored 7 vote bloc swap that was in the air before the vote. Meaning that 2018 wasn't above board either and would have to be revoted. But its only 4 years out. There is so many, legal, political and financial implications that any decision will be costly and involve the courts.

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If there is no mechanism for the removal of a World Cup due to corruption, than yes FIFA would be in a very delicate legal position. SLC wasn't removed as a host when bribery was found, its hard to imagine, unless written into either the bidding or hosting agreements. Unless it specifically states that allegations of bribery/corruption will lead to removal of competition/hosting, FIFA has very little to stand on. And if it does, than Qatar's corruption will directly implicate Spain/Portugal because of the much rumored 7 vote bloc swap that was in the air before the vote. Meaning that 2018 wasn't above board either and would have to be revoted. But its only 4 years out. There is so many, legal, political and financial implications that any decision will be costly and involve the courts.

FIFA does of course have clauses giving them the right to terminate the agreement with the LOC. Though it's not included in the document. It is covered by Part O section 37 in the 2010 South Africa Organising association agreement. I would be very surprised if the 2022 document didn't include the same section.

The SLC-scandal came out in the open in November 1998. Only 3 years and 3 months before the Winter Olympics. Unless they were to give it to one of the three previous host in 98, 94 or 92. It wasn't enough time to find a new host. It's still 8 years until Qatar is supposed to host the World Cup. More than enough time to find another host. Hell, both the 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006 and 2010 were awarded only 6 years ahead of the tournament. While Brazil was awarded it 7 years ahead.

Unlike the 2022 selection, no evidence has yet to come to say that Russia bought the 2018 World Cup. Even though it would be no big surprise if they did.

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Oooh, de ja vu, I think I've just read that post 5 minutes ago somewhere else :lol:

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I can't wait to see how this develops. FIFA is going to be finally exposed as the liars they are (as if they didn't got exposed enough already) and end this farce. Although I agree this might be smokescreen to divert media attention from the obvious issues Brazil 2014 is suffering.

Too bad that spineless Blatter is going to probably win once again, since FIFA is infested by many corrupt people besides him which only care for money instead of the game.

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If there is no mechanism for the removal of a World Cup due to corruption, than yes FIFA would be in a very delicate legal position. SLC wasn't removed as a host when bribery was found, its hard to imagine, unless written into either the bidding or hosting agreements. Unless it specifically states that allegations of bribery/corruption will lead to removal of competition/hosting, FIFA has very little to stand on. And if it does, than Qatar's corruption will directly implicate Spain/Portugal because of the much rumored 7 vote bloc swap that was in the air before the vote. Meaning that 2018 wasn't above board either and would have to be revoted. But its only 4 years out. There is so many, legal, political and financial implications that any decision will be costly and involve the courts.

it's cute when you play at international lawyer, but your logic leaps -- like implicating 2018 -- are much more far fetched than a face-saving revote at this point.

as for a costly legal battle? yes, it's possible. they could always strip qatar of the games and go from there. besides, you don't even know what these hosting contracts say. nobody does.

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Take it off them now! Here's an idea, give 2022 to the USA (2022 runner up) and give 2026 to Asia (Qatar's Federation) and the let the 2022 bidders Australia/Japan/Korea and China fight it out.

Not the worst idea in the world!

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Take it off them now! Here's an idea, give 2022 to the USA (2022 runner up) and give 2026 to Asia (Qatar's Federation) and the let the 2022 bidders Australia/Japan/Korea and China fight it out.

Not the worst idea in the world!

it isn't, but to be fair you'd have to have a pretty twisted mind to come up with an idea worse than what we've got now.

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