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I'm usually against boycotting, but I take exception for the 2022 World Cup.

I'm not an extremist but I agree with the idea. I silently plan to do things to punish FIFA;During 2018 WC,I will never watch any matches on TV or on internet.I won't buy any products of official sponsors. I'll save small amount of money every month from next month to Nov.? :lol: , 2018 and donate for those Nepalese people through very reliable organization.

It should be easy to "boycott" the World Cup because you can simply not qualify. Don't show up for the qualifying tournament and you won't be in the World Cup.

I myself as one of general football observers,it's easy to take actions.But how,maybe you meant team,would do that? You said not showing up qualifying is the way to do that but it sounds impossible. Deliberately paly to lose?

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We've also made it out of the knock-out round more recently.

Tony if I see you say England should be given the hosting rights one more time I will throw my computer. This is really getting old pal. There's nothing wrong with Russia hosting in 2018 and 2022 shou

Someone needs to sue FIFA over this mess. Rivals bidders, European leagues and clubs, TV networks, sponsors, players...all are being mucked about because of FIFA's inability to think properly. The bi

I myself as one of general football observers,it's easy to take actions.But how,maybe you meant team,would do that? You said not showing up qualifying is the way to do that but it sounds impossible. Deliberately paly to lose?

I don't think you have to play in the qualification tournaments at all. Bhutan and Brunei did not enter the 2014 World Cup qualifying tournaments, so it should be possible for the US, Mexican and Canadian teams to decline to participate in the 2022 qualifying tournament.

FIFA would be enraged. I imagine they would try to levy sanctions against the national teams that declined to participate. Honestly I don't see that as a problem unless FIFA ruins the careers of individual players, which seems unlikely. At this point I don't think FIFA is much of a help to the domestic leagues in North America anyway.

The far greater concern is that the Arab world would be outraged as well, which would be a massive political headache for the governments of the countries involved. Since the heads of state have indirect control over their national teams I can't see this happening.

I should have mentioned that the only reason I mentioned the North American teams specifically was because of the broadcast revenue. That's the one way fans can directly punish FIFA: by not watching the World Cup. And no Canadian, Mexican or USA team in the cup would really hurt the broadcasters.

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Team boycotts World Cup = Qatar turns off that country's oil. I doubt if anyone would dare do it.

OPEC is no longer as strong as they used to be. The rest of the world (except Japan and China) have learned not to be held hostage to an oil cut-off again. The world has learned to depend on other sources of energy; and it weakens those primitive Arab states quite a bit.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have doubts this would happen but it's interesting to note nonetheless. If FIFA did strip Qatar of the WC, the fallout would be immense. First of all, I would expect Qatar to mount some sort of judicial challenge to any decision taken by FIFA calling for a new WC host nation. Second, I would expect a boycott (probably by all the FIFA members of the Arab League) of FIFA events.

http://espnfc.com/news/story/_/id/1717697/qatar-lose-2022-world-cup-fifa-employee-claims?cc=4716

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Anyway, regardless of me not approving Fifa's choice of Qatar as Hosts for 2022, Fifa has let Qatar decrease the number of Stadium's for 2022, to 8 or 9. So these are the Venues I would use:

Lusail Iconic Stadium, Lusail (86,250 Seats) - Final, Semi-Final, Quarter-Final, Round of 16 and Group Matches (Including Opening Match). Brand New.

Khalifa International Stadium, Doha (68,030 Seats) - Semi-Final, Quarter-Final, Round of 16 and Group Matches. Renovated and Expanded.

Sports City Stadium, Doha (47,560 Seats) - Quarter-Final, Round of 16 and Group Matches. Brand New.

Al-Khor Stadium, Al Khor (45,330 Seats) - Quarter-Final, Round of 16 and Group Matches. Brand New.

Al-Shamal Stadium, Madinat ash Shamal (45,120 Seats) - 3rd/4th Place Play-Off, Round of 16 and Group Matches. Brand New.

Al-Wakrah Stadium, Al Wakhrah (45,120 Seats) - Round of 16 and Group Matches. Rebuilt.

Umm Salal Stadium, Umm Salal (45,120 Seats) - Round of 16 and Group Matches. Brand New.

Ahmed bin Ali Stadium, Al Rayyan (44,740 Seats) Round of 16 and Group Matches. Renovated and Expanded.

So, seeing as though Fifa's rule is only 1 City can have 2 Stadiums, the best out of a bad situation, Doha has 2 Stadiums, and some of the others are surrounding area's of Doha.

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Qatar World Cup labour costs to rise after revelation of construction deaths

IMF warns of danger to Qatari development model following publicity surrounding migrant construction worker deaths

Qatar is likely to face higher labour costs as a result of publicity about the deaths of migrant construction workers building the infrastructure for the 2022 World Cup football tournament, according to the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

The Guardian reported in September that dozens of Nepali workers died last summer in Qatar and that labourers were not given enough food and water.

Qatar, which has denied the Guardian's findings, has experienced a growing influx of foreigners, now estimated at 1.8 million, with its population rising 10% in 2013.

"Working conditions of some construction workers and domestic help has made global headlines and could affect the availability and cost of hiring new workers in the future," said the IMF after completing annual consultations with Qatar. "This would hinder growth, since the success of Qatar's current development model depends importantly on the ability to rapidly hire expatriate workers."

The gas-rich nation has planned to spend about $140bn (£84bn) on new infrastructure in the run-up to the World Cup, with projects including a metro, port and airport.

Such major public investments entail a possibility of overheating in the near term and low return and overcapacity in the medium term, the IMF warned. "In particular, the extent to which public investment will durably boost private sector productivity remains uncertain," it said.

Certain big-ticket projects such as the metro, port, and airport have been scaled down or divided into phases to reduce the overcapacity risk. The authorities are preparing a shortlist of critical projects, said the IMF. The relevant projects were not specified.

The large-scale nature of the programme has led to implementation delays and cost overruns, and Qatar will continue to face the risk of cost escalation given its commitment to a compressed timetable ahead of the World Cup, added the IMF.

Reuters

http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2014/mar/10/qatar-world-cup-labour-costs-construction-deaths

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Qatar World Cup timing decision put back to early 2015

A decision on the timing of the 2022 World Cup in Qatar will not be made before the start of 2015. Fifa had said an announcement could be made later this year but Sheikh Salman bin Ibrahim Al Khalifa, the head of the task force that is making the decision on the timing of the tournament, said it would be not be taken before next year.

Salman, from Bahrain, is the president of the Asian Football Confederation and a Fifa executive committee member. "There are a lot of partners that we need to sit and talk with and find the best solution and I am sure this decision will not be taken before the first quarter of 2015.

"The decision is to look at the possibilities of the timing, as we speak now it is still June/July but the aim of this task force is to look at the other options and the concerns that some will have."

Salman was speaking on a visit to London where he also signed a co-operation agreement with the Premier League, whose chief executive Richard Scudamore said lengthy talks were needed with all stakeholders about moving the time of the World Cup.

He said: "Our position is quite clear – Qatar were awarded it, Qatar should hold it. It was awarded in full knowledge of the conditions. The bid book contained how they were going to deal with those conditions and that is the current situation. Their entire campaign was about how you would cope with holding it in summer.

"If anything is going to change, all we have ever said is this is complicated and complex, all factors need looking at and weighed up, can we calm down and look at it properly?".

Salman said the fact the World Cup was being held in Qatar had acted as a catalyst to improve the rights and conditions of migrant workers. Investigations have revealed a shocking number of deaths among workers from Nepal and Salman said: "I think because of the World Cup, this issue is being addressed and looked at.

"I am sure that the government of Qatar is co-operating positively in that sense. The best thing the World Cup is doing now is trying to improve the working conditions in Qatar. If it wasn't for the World Cup I'm not sure we would have heard of this issue."

http://www.theguardian.com/football/2014/mar/17/qatar-world-cup-2022-winter-summer-decision

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BOOM!

Front page of tomorrow's Telegraph.....
Bi9dkySCYAAjyZ2.jpg


A senior Fifa official and his family were paid almost $2 million from a Qatari firm linked to the country’s successful bid for the 2022 World Cup, The Telegraph discloses.

Jack Warner, the former vice-president of Fifa, appears to have been personally paid $1.2 million (£720,000) from a company controlled by a former Qatari football official shortly after the decision to award the country the tournament.


Payments totalling almost $750,000 were made to Mr Warner’s sons, documents show. A further $400,000 was paid to one of his employees.

It is understood that the FBI is now investigating Trinidad-based Mr Warner and his alleged links to the Qatari bid, and that the former Fifa official’s eldest son, who lives in Miami, has been helping the inquiry as a co-operating witness...

The documents seen by The Daily Telegraph raise further questions about Mr Warner’s activities. One email, which appears to have been sent by one of Mr Warner’s employees, shows that the staff member personally received $412,000 from the Qatari company and that Mr Warner’s son, Daryll, was paid $432,000. Daryan, his other son, was paid $316,000 via a company called We Buy Houses.

Regarding the payments to Daryan, the email states that he was “contracted … based on his understanding, contacts and history with the regional players who make up an integral part of the defence team … pursuant to Fifa bribery allegations. As stated in our letter of June 11, 2011, the value of US $316,000, and this is an initial deposit to offset legal and other expenses related to the matter.”

In July, a different email shows that “monies in the amount of $1.2 million” were wire transferred to J&D International, another of Mr Warner’s companies, by the same Qatari firm. It states that this is to “offset legal and other related expenses associated with regard to an ongoing matter”.

Mr Warner and his family declined to comment. A spokesman for Qatar’s 2022 World Cup organising committee said: “The 2022 bid committee strictly adhered to Fifa’s bidding regulations in compliance with their code of ethics.

“The supreme committee for delivery and legacy and the individuals involved in the 2022 bid committee are unaware of any allegations surrounding business dealings between private individuals.”



More @ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/football/world-cup/10704290/Qatar-World-Cup-2022-investigation-former-Fifa-vice-president-Jack-Warner-and-family-paid-millions.html

Edited by Rob.
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Qatar World Cup timing decision put back to early 2015

A decision on the timing of the 2022 World Cup in Qatar will not be made before the start of 2015. Fifa had said an announcement could be made later this year but Sheikh Salman bin Ibrahim Al Khalifa, the head of the task force that is making the decision on the timing of the tournament, said it would be not be taken before next year.

Salman, from Bahrain, is the president of the Asian Football Confederation and a Fifa executive committee member. "There are a lot of partners that we need to sit and talk with and find the best solution and I am sure this decision will not be taken before the first quarter of 2015.

"The decision is to look at the possibilities of the timing, as we speak now it is still June/July but the aim of this task force is to look at the other options and the concerns that some will have."

Salman was speaking on a visit to London where he also signed a co-operation agreement with the Premier League, whose chief executive Richard Scudamore said lengthy talks were needed with all stakeholders about moving the time of the World Cup.

He said: "Our position is quite clear – Qatar were awarded it, Qatar should hold it. It was awarded in full knowledge of the conditions. The bid book contained how they were going to deal with those conditions and that is the current situation. Their entire campaign was about how you would cope with holding it in summer.

"If anything is going to change, all we have ever said is this is complicated and complex, all factors need looking at and weighed up, can we calm down and look at it properly?".

Salman said the fact the World Cup was being held in Qatar had acted as a catalyst to improve the rights and conditions of migrant workers. Investigations have revealed a shocking number of deaths among workers from Nepal and Salman said: "I think because of the World Cup, this issue is being addressed and looked at.

"I am sure that the government of Qatar is co-operating positively in that sense. The best thing the World Cup is doing now is trying to improve the working conditions in Qatar. If it wasn't for the World Cup I'm not sure we would have heard of this issue."

http://www.theguardian.com/football/2014/mar/17/qatar-world-cup-2022-winter-summer-decision

Yeah of course, because Russia 2018 has pre-empted the agenda. They will have to deal with 2018 now first before Qatar again. Or might as well demolish the 2 in one fell blow.

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Oh man :o. The sh*t is just a few hours from the fan...time for the entertainment! *grabs popcorn*

Never thought I'd say this, but well done to the Telegraph :lol:

For some reason, I can't get that video up...does it actually show the payments being made?

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Tut Tut Tut Blatter and the rest of Fifa. Your not helping yourselves, so no one will help you now. You made this mess, now clear it up please and save Football.

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The Qatari press release about this is just laughable... who is doing their PR? I mean by now they must be self aware enough to realise that their rep is corrupt as hell. There is no way that they should be saying anything along the lines of "private individual's transactions blah blah.." they should be saying that they are asking the Telegraph for all the information they have on this so theirs and FIFAs ethics committees can take it into consideration as part of the ongoing investigations or something similar.

Otto Bismark once said - "fools learn from their mistakes, but a wise man learns from the mistakes of others"... FIFA didn't learn from the IOC's Salt Lake scandal and haven't even learned from their catalogue of mistakes with the 2022 bid process.... they're not even in a category with fools... they're total tw@ts.

Edited by Ripley
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The FiFA press release about this is just laughable... who is doing their PR? I mean by now they must be self aware enough to realise that their rep is corrupt as hell. There is no way that they should be saying anything along the lines of "private individual's transactions blah blah.." they should be saying that they are asking the Telegraph for all the information they have on this so their ethics committee can take it into consideration as part on its ongoing investigations or something similar.

Otto Bismark once said - "fools learn from their mistakes, but a wise man learns from the mistakes of others"... FIFA didn't learn from the IOC's Salt Lake scandal and haven't even learned from their catalogue of mistakes with the 2022 bid process.... they're not even in a category with fools... they're total tw@ts.

Man, your post is really funny. You seem to imply FIFA has an ethics comitee.
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