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Japanese Government Supports

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Guest TOKYO 2016

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2016 Olympic Games Bid Promotion Japanese lawmakers federation launch.

President Yoshiro MORI Former Prime minister.

Japanese government will financial guarantee.

First time the government's financial guarantee about the international games bid.

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The strange thing about Tokyo's bid is that it is probably one of the best technical bid ever conceived, it has the complete support of all public authorities and has a decent support from the Japanese people and, for me at least, it's still missing a Wow factor...

Well I guess Tokyo has still 8 months or so to convince us.

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well, it's because of the 4 finalists, they have already put on the show!!

And Japanese architectural design is very austere and understated -- NOTHING flashy -- so there is really nothing to keel one over.

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I think it's perhaps more to do with the fact that we've just had an Asian Games. We've all got a post-Beijing hangover and we don't want to touch that stuff again for a while. A big British fry-up and a cup of tea the next morning will go some way to curing it, but whether we want to drink again the evening after such a night is not something we want to think about right now.

How to kill a metaphor in one easy lesson ^

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Guest TOKYO 2016
Japan to launch project to enhance competitiveness of Olympians

Tuesday 06th January, 07:12 AM JST

TOKYO — A national project to enhance the competitiveness of Japan’s Olympic athletes is poised to kick off in April with the aim of boosting the country’s medal count toward the 2016 Summer Games, which Tokyo is bidding to host.

The project, the first of its kind sponsored by the sports ministry, is designed to provide intensive support for athletes considered to be Olympic medal contenders. Its first goal is to double the medal count that Japan achieved at last year’s Beijing Olympics at the next Games.

The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology has earmarked 600 million yen for the project in its fiscal 2009 draft budget, in addition to the money distributed to individual sports federations for their programs to develop athletes.

Under the ministry’s project, eight teams of experts, including doctors, counselors, physical trainers and scouting staff, will be created with each doling out support for top-level athletes, particularly those capable of winning gold medals.

National coaches will also be named for around 17 sporting events in which Japan is believed to have strong medal chances. People familiar with the project said the list would likely include judo and swimming, Japan’s traditional sources of medals, as well as canoeing, in which the country missed out on its first-ever Olympic medal in the sport in Beijing.

‘‘As a national strategy, we are looking to increase the number of medals our athletes win,’’ a senior ministry official said.

Japan won 25 medals in Beijing, including nine golds. The number does not include a bronze due to be awarded to hammer thrower Koji Murofushi after two Belarusian medalists tested positive for banned drugs.

Besides doubling the number of medals at the 2012 London Games, the project envisions lifting Japan from 11th at Beijing to fifth or higher in the total medals standings.

Tokyo is bidding for the 2016 Games and the host city will be named by the International Olympic Committee on Oct. 2 from among the Japanese capital, Chicago, Madrid and Rio de Janeiro.

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I think it's perhaps more to do with the fact that we've just had an Asian Games. We've all got a post-Beijing hangover and we don't want to touch that stuff again for a while. A big British fry-up and a cup of tea the next morning will go some way to curing it, but whether we want to drink again the evening after such a night is not something we want to think about right now.

How to kill a metaphor in one easy lesson ^

See I feel differently. I think a Japanese games has the potential to be just as interesting as China, but then again, I'd be happy to have the games in the U.S. again, and if Madrid won, I wouldn't be upset. It's Rio I don't like.

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What's your reasons?

I'd just prefer Tokyo, the U.S. or even Madrid. I don't have a lot of confidence in Brazil in general, and I hate their two stadium plan (that should just invalidate their bid right there, or has it changed?).

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I'd just prefer Tokyo, the U.S. or even Madrid. I don't have a lot of confidence in Brazil in general, and I hate their two stadium plan (that should just invalidate their bid right there, or has it changed?).

Meh, fair enough. We all have our reasons and preferences.

Personally, I love Japan, but I'm not a fan of repeat city hosts. Rio appeals to me for sentiment reasons. The two stadium plan doesn't bug me one way or the other _ I don't see how it affects the running of the games themselves and the concept already has a precedent in the winter and commonwealth games. Chicago I have no beef with either. Madrid? Well, I'm one of the "too soon since Barcelona" brigade, though have nothing against the city itself.

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Meh, fair enough. We all have our reasons and preferences.

Personally, I love Japan, but I'm not a fan of repeat city hosts. Rio appeals to me for sentiment reasons. The two stadium plan doesn't bug me one way or the other _ I don't see how it affects the running of the games themselves and the concept already has a precedent in the winter and commonwealth games. Chicago I have no beef with either. Madrid? Well, I'm one of the "too soon since Barcelona" brigade, though have nothing against the city itself.

Regarding the two stadium issue, you cannot compare the winter games with the summer as they are two different animals. Athletics belongs in the Olympic Stadium, even if it's not required by the Olympic Charter.

You say you're not a fan of "repeat" hosts, but by the time 2016 rolls around it will have been 52 years since they last hosted and as we all know, 2012 is London's third time, and if Paris had been selected it would have been their third time.

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Regarding the two stadium issue, you cannot compare the winter games with the summer as they are two different animals. Athletics belongs in the Olympic Stadium, even if it's not required by the Olympic Charter.

It just doesn't bother me. I know others like yourself don't like it, but to me it's a non-issue. It's not like the athletics is held at the same time in the same place as the ceremonies. To me, it's just what works best for the host - if that's what best suits them, it doesn't affect me.

You say you're not a fan of "repeat" hosts, but by the time 2016 rolls around it will have been 52 years since they last hosted and as we all know, 2012 is London's third time, and if Paris had been selected it would have been their third time.

True, of course. Which is why I preferred NYC for 2012 until it became clear it wasn't going to happen for them. After that, I was happy enough for London, though I still would have preferred a "new" host. I'd love Japan to host again some day, but my preference would be with Osaka or elsewhere before Tokyo.

That said, I understand that repeat city hosts are always going to come up again in future. I'll probably still support the newbies more in the bid races, though.

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Guest TOKYO 2016
Japanese Prime Minister Taro Aso Pledges Support to Tokyo 2016

TOKYO, Japan, January 28. JAPANESE Prime Minister Taro Aso delivered a major policy speech to the lower house of parliament today in which he officially pledged his support for bringing the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games to Tokyo.

The move provides resounding affirmation that the nation's administration is fully behind the effort to inspire both Japan and the world in times of economic uncertainty by organizing a unique celebration of human achievement and cultural interaction in the heart of dynamic Tokyo.

The news adds further momentum to Tokyo 2016's groundswell of support spanning every echelon of Japanese society, from elite athletes to private enterprise and from government to citizens of all ages.

Dr Ichiro Kono, Chairman and CEO of Tokyo 2016, said:

"We are extremely grateful for the ardent support of our Olympian Prime Minister on behalf of the citizens of Japan. The backing of Prime Minister Aso's administration is further proof that Japanese society is solidly in favor of our 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games Bid.

"The Japanese business community is also enthusiastically behind Tokyo 2016, and the passionate support of the general public continues to intensify day by day. As we near the deadline for submitting our unique Candidature File to the IOC, we are extremely proud to enjoy such strong support and deep financial backing."

The Tokyo Metropolitan Government recently announced the allocation of an additional 100 billion yen (US$1.1 billion) for Tokyo 2016 in its proposed 2009 fiscal budget, bringing its ring-fenced contingency fund for Games preparation, including construction and maintenance of city-owned venues and infrastructure, to 400 billion yen (US$4.4 billion).

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