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It seems Hamilton is seriously planning to grab most events in these games. More than Toronto or any other city.

Apple, do you know when they'll release a detailed bid book or at least the list of host/venues?

Thanks for all the info!

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Hamilton setting Pan-Am priorities

Four venues on the table today

January 12, 2009

John Kernaghan

The Hamilton Spectator

http://www.thespec.com/Sports/article/494726

It's getting closer to crunch time in terms of Hamilton's Pan American Games role, the point where city councillors will have to make some big financial decisions.

That will be set up by today's report to the city's committee of the whole. It identifies four venues Hamilton could submit to the Toronto 2015 bid bosses, and asks for council's direction so staff can report back next month on financial implications of winning new and improved facilities in the bid process.

The facilities are:

* A 24,000-to-27,000-seat stadium to replace decaying Ivor Wynne Stadium. It would have a 400-metre track, 400-metre training track, retail space and training space indoors, as well as perhaps house The Canadian Football Hall of Fame.

* A 50-metre pool that Toronto 2015 has earmarked for Hamilton as a training facility.

* An improved Copps Coliseum to house volleyball.

* A permanent velodrome, if the bid board decides on that option versus a temporary venue, to build on Hamilton's legacy from the 2003 world road championships.

The report, prepared by Tourism Hamilton executive director David Adames and to be presented by Tim McCabe, general manager of planning and economic development, identified four possible areas to house a stadium.

It listed the West Harbourfront, East-end Gateway at Confederation Park, downtown Hamilton and the airport lands.

If the $1.8-billion Games were won and Hamilton was awarded the four venues, 70 per cent of the capital costs would be handled by the provincial and federal governments, the remainder by Hamilton. But the city would receive credits for any land donated to house the facilities. The province has agreed to cover any cost overruns. And the Hamilton Tiger-Cats might contribute to the stadium bill.

Toronto 2015's bid book, a detailed blueprint of how a regional Games spanning the Golden Horseshoe would be staged, must be submitted by late April, in a competition that includes Lima, Peru, and Bogota, Colombia. A decision on the 40-nation showcase is expected next fall.

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This report is from Hamilton's City Hall to the council, council will review the report this evening to give approval.

New Stadium:

A new stadium in Hamilton would be used for track and field during the Pan Am Games. Track and field is one of the premier events for the Games and would attract athletes from virtually all participating countries. Planning for a stadium needs to incorporate consideration of both Games use and post-Games use of the stadium, which can present very different needs. For example, planning for Games use would entail meeting the requirements of the Pan American Sport Organization (PASO) and the Games Organizing Committee, including security considerations for an international sport event, athlete zones as well as media and spectator access. Post-Games use of the stadium would need to align with City goals as well as addressing Provincial and national sport and recreation agendas. This planning would entail multiple purposes, ranging from community recreational uses to competitive sport to entertainment uses. Sport uses would include track and field, football, soccer and rugby. The stadium would also provide the best track and field venue in Eastern Canada. The stadium would provide a new home to the Hamilton Tiger-Cats and would create new opportunities to host Provincial, national and international sport events, including the Grey Cup game.

As one of the most important Games venues, the stadium would have a primary role in shaping the image of the City that is broadcast to the world and the impression made by the City on those attending the Games. The impact of broadcasting will be felt not only during the Games but also afterwards as the stadium is used for events well into the future. Therefore the quality of the stadium as a facility is a significant consideration. However, an even greater symbolic impact could be achieved if the construction of the stadium itself were part of a larger story about the transformation of Hamilton.

A stadium worthy of hosting track and field for the Pan Am Games, as well as one that makes sense as a legacy to Hamilton and Southern Ontario would entail the following key features:

• 24,000-27,000 permanent seats

• Scaleable seating for possible additional temporary seats

• 400m track

• adjoining 400m warm up track

• media facilities

• possible new home for the Canadian Football Hall of Fame and Museum

• Adequate staging space (for events)

• Retail space

• Training facilities

As part of the planning process for the stadium, staff has re-visited the work that was undertaken in 2003 and 2005 for Hamilton’s previous bids for the Commonwealth Games. That work included the development of evaluation criteria to assess possible precincts for a new stadium and review of 20 possible sites. In 2003, Council, through Report CM03015, “City of Hamilton Support for the 2010 Commonwealth Games Bid” received and approved the report entitled, “Hamilton 2010 Commonwealth Games Stadium Land Use Review, Final Report”, attached as Appendix “A”. That report provided rationale for a short-list of three preferred precincts for a new stadium. In order of priority, the sites were:

(i) Precinct 1: West Harbourfront

(ii) Precinct 2: East End Gateway – Confederation Park

(iii) Precinct 3: Greenfield Precinct – Nash Neighbourhood/East Stoney Creek Mountain

Urban Strategies Inc. worked with staff in 2003 on the initial review and has been re-engaged to update the 2003 report. Key changes and opportunities that have arisen since the Commonwealth Games bids include Provincial initiatives such as Places to Grow, Metrolinx and Active 2010 as well as new transport infrastructure including the opening of the Red Hill Parkway. These policies, along with consideration of the City’s new Strategic Plan and the development of the new Official Plan will be taken into account in preparation of the next report to Council.

The report provides an updated evaluation criteria and short-listed possible precincts for the stadium. The evaluation criteria include:

• Size: stadium size and required footprint for a new stadium

• Land-use compatibility: between the stadium and surrounding area

• Consistency with Provincial and Municipal Planning Policy

• Legacy to the City of Hamilton and symbolic value: for sports and entertainment and associated programs

• Clustering Potential: potential to site the stadium, velodrome, and pool in close proximity

• Regeneration Impact: for the surrounding area • Servicing: water, sewer, communications

• Accessibility: access by multiple modes of transport; provision of parking

• Private Financing Potential – potential to attract partnerships

• Risk and Complexity: for developing stadium on a particular location

• Cost: site implications on cost

• Overall feasibility

Based on initial work, and the revised evaluation criteria, staff is recommending the following four precincts for Council’s consideration as possible stadium sites. For the purposes of the bid process, the City will be required to choose one preferred site for submission to the BIDCO for inclusion in the international bid book. However, these sites are being recommended with the full understanding that the final selection of a stadium site will only follow the award of the 2015 Pan American Games and that a full and thorough public consultation process and more detailed analytical work would be undertaken on Council’s approved site. This approach is consistent with complying with the Government of Canada’s hosting policy for International Sport Events. This policy requires an Environmental Assessment Plan that includes public consultation for any sport venues used as part of an international sport event. The four suggested precincts, in no particular priority order are:

(i) Precinct 1: West Harbourfront

(ii) Precinct 2: East-end Gateway: Confederation Park

(iii) Precinct 3: Downtown Hamilton

(iv) Precinct 4: Airport lands

A New Future for Ivor Wynne Stadium Precinct:

Report CM03015 provided a rationale for constructing a new stadium and not upgrading Ivor Wynne Stadium. The construction of a new stadium provides an unique community development opportunity to re-purpose and re-design the Ivor Wynne Stadium precinct. The public school board is constructing a new Prince of Wales school at the corner of Cannon Street and Melrose Avenue; the precinct is on the route for the proposed east-west “B-line” for the City’s Metrolinx plan; and the footprint of the Ivor Wynne block provides an exciting opportunity for the City to plan a new development that includes open space and recreational amenities. The development will also provide the City with revenues and tax assessment to off-set the costs of new sport venues related to the Pan Am Games.

New 50 metre pool:

Aquatics is a significant part of the Pan American Games. A new major aquatic centre will be constructed to host the Games. In addition, a number of associated pools, including 50m competitive pools will be constructed in Southern Ontario. Today, there is a lack of quality aquatic facilities in Southern Ontario. The Games provide an opportunity to rectify that situation. Hamilton has a rich tradition in aquatics, and similar to other municipalities, does not have a 50m pool. As well, a number of the City’s pools require substantial capital repair in the short-term, while some areas of the City have been identified as being under-served by pools.

The BIDCO has earmarked a 50m pool for Hamilton, to be used for training during the Games. McMaster University is assessing building the pool as part of the new David Braley Athletic Centre on the University campus. This would link athletics, high performance sport, rehabilitation as well as community recreation use. If the pool were located at the University, a community access agreement would be put in place to ensure community use of the facility.

Should McMaster University not pursue the 50m pool, staff is recommending that options, including potential locations, be brought back to Council for construction of a 50m pool facility in the city. The facility would address both community recreation uses as well as competitive aquatics and sport tourism opportunities.

Use of Copps Coliseum:

Staff has recommended that Copps Coliseum be used during the Games as the venue for court volleyball, becoming the focal point for one of the key Pan Am Games sports. Volleyball has an avid following by spectators and will draw well for television and on-line viewers. Although no capital dollars have been budgeted for volleyball at Copps by BIDCO, there will be substantial operating funds provided through the Games budget for the venue, particularly to meet venue fit-out requirements.

New Permanent Velodrome:

The BIDCO is contemplating whether to construct a permanent velodrome or a temporary facility for the Games. There is a substantial cost differential between the options. However, only a permanent velodrome would provide a sport legacy. No final determination has yet been made on the location of the velodrome as well.

Prior to the bid for the Pan Am Games, the National Cycling Centre Hamilton began the process of creating a feasibility study for a permanent, international-calibre velodrome. The Centre would like to build the velodrome in Hamilton. There are several reasons cited by the Centre for this: Hamilton’s cycling legacy from hosting the Road World Cycling Championships in 2003; the City’s cycling tradition; the Centre’s connection with the University; and the Centre being located in Hamilton. The Centre is finalizing a feasibility study now, having engaged some of the best consultants in the world for velodromes. Staff need time to review the final feasibility study to report back to Council on the venue and its opportunities and implications for the City.

Recognizing that there is no international calibre velodrome in Canada at this time and the importance of conceiving a velodrome for both high-performance sport and community recreation use, the Centre is developing a velodrome based on best practices from velodromes in the United States, Australia and Britain. In particular, the velodrome built in Manchester for the 2002 Commonwealth Games has been identified as a facility that has provided a national legacy for Britain (British track cyclists now dominate track cycling internationally because of the training at the venue) and a community legacy for Manchester for health and wellness.

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Pan Am wish list hits $220m

City's cost jumps sharply under funding formula to build facilities

January 13, 2009

John Kernaghan

The Hamilton Spectator

http://www.thespec.com/News/Local/article/495196

Hamilton's wish list for the 2015 Pan American Games bid will be $220 million covering three new facilities.

That figure was revealed to city councillors yesterday by the city's lead hand on the Games, Tourism Hamilton director David Adames.

They also learned the "informal" funding formula to build facilities, which could include a 27,000-seat stadium, a 50-metre pool and an indoor velodrome, might require 44 per cent support from the city and any private partners, up from the 30 per cent previously thought.

That would push the city's contribution to the facilities to almost $97 million from an estimated $66 million.

Adames pointed out, however, that that margin could be offset somewhat by Toronto 2015 paying for operating expenses for the duration of the Games.

While the city's cost is rising, the time frame for it to make the key decision about stadium location is shrinking.

"There is no firm deadline to identify a site but the bid book is due in April and the bid company wants a preferred stadium site (from Hamilton) by February or March," Adames said.

But when all was said and done by city councillors, much was said and only one thing done.

That's the Confederation Park site as a candidate to house a $150-million stadium as Hamilton's part in the 2015 bid.

It became toast when city councillors voted it off the list of potential sites presented in Adames' update on Hamilton's developing role in Toronto 2015.

Councillor Chad Collins argued it made no sense to take valuable greenspace out of the urban landscape.

With that site struck from the list, councillors asked city staff to again consider a revamped Ivor Wynne Stadium as an alternative.

It was unanimous that no site was perfect and Adames later pointed out there are very few open sites in Hamilton of 8 hectares, the size needed to host track and field given the need for a training track.

Adames said all 20 locations considered in past Commonwealth Games bids would be revisited and perhaps another area of the city offered for consideration next month.

More detailed reports are expected then, but time is ticking away. And at some point in that time frame city council will also have to make a call on a financial commitment.

Civic politicians did not amend the list of venues the city is seeking, led by the proposed stadium.

McMaster University is assessing the 50-metre pool for inclusion in the David Braley Athletic Centre and a feasibility study/business plan for the velodrome is expected soon.

It's being prepared by the Canadian Cycling Centre Hamilton, which is based at McMaster and is one of five high-performance centres in Canada.

Toronto 2015 must identify its venues in a bid book presented in April to the Pan American Sports Organization.

The Canadian bid, which will span the Golden Horseshoe, is up against Lima, Peru, and Bogota, Colombia, in the competition for the 2015 showcase.

A vote next fall will determine the winning host city.

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Hi Everyone.

I have a question for our International friends. What are Toronto chances of winning this bid? and what does Toronto need to do to win this bid.?Thanks you.

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Hi Everyone.

I have a question for our International friends. What are Toronto chances of winning this bid? and what does Toronto need to do to win this bid.?Thanks you.

Well, what's the competition? Is it still just Lima and Bogata? Yeah, I think Canada's chances are pretty good then!

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Bogotá and Lima are completely silent about their projects. Don't we have any peruvian or colombian members here?

Plus, it may be too early for another south american city to host the games after Rio's 2007 games. I'd say their best shot would be in 2019.

The last panamerican games in an English-speaking host was in 1999, in Winnipeg. I bet this is one of the cards the canadians are using to secure 2015 is their turn.

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This is a pretty solid bid so Toronto 2015 has an excellent chance of winning the bid.

By the way the bid book needs to be completed by April but we'll get an idea of who will host what by March or late February, so really only a few weeks.

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Council fumbling Pan-am bid: Braley

A mistake to drop Confederation Park option, he says

January 15, 2009

Rob Faulkner and John Kernaghan

The Hamilton Spectator

http://www.thespec.com/News/Local/article/496471

Hamilton city council made a bad call in rejecting the best stadium location available.

That's the view of an original architect of the Pan American Games bid, businessman David Braley.

The auto-parts magnate was shocked that council Monday deleted Confederation Park from consideration. He said that east-end gateway location presents the best chance to generate long-term revenue to cover operating costs of a $150-million facility. The 27,000-seat stadium would be home to track and field for the Games, then become a multi-use facility and home to the Ticats.

Braley, who took the Pan Am concept to council last April, said it is shortsighted to not fully examine a site identified by city staff as one of four contenders.

But no one on council yesterday showed much appetite for getting Confederation Park back onto a front-burner.

And the president of Toronto 2015, which is assembling the Golden Horseshoe-wide bid, said none of the three remaining sites presents a problem as part of a bid book to be submitted April 30.

Also, Jagoda Pike said the distance between Toronto and Hamilton isn't a drawback.

The 2015 bid company is expected to recommend an athletes village for Toronto with track and field competitors bused to and from the Hamilton stadium.

Pike said her group is waiting for a preferred site from Hamilton, the only city Toronto 2015 has been talking to about a stadium.

Braley, meantime, laid out the business plan for the Confederation site. He stressed public ownership of the land, a mere eight-hectare dent in an 83-hectare site, and the possibility of private partners bringing more attractions to a site that already has a water park.

Braley, who sits on an eight- member Hamilton Pan Am community advisory board, said parking at the site and naming rights for the stadium would be lucrative long-term revenue streams.

The proximity to the QEW would elevate the value of naming rights and enhance Hamilton's image.

The Confederation Park site could be revisited later, said businessman Ron Foxcroft, an advisory board member.

"The key is winning the bid. Then you can make changes to locations and facilities. But you have to win."

Meantime, upset with the vote to kill the possibility of Confederation Park hosting a Pan Am Games stadium, Councillor Bob Bratina wants a study of future waterfront uses.

Bratina plans to ask staff to survey Lake Ontario sites and to advise council on the potential for acceptable recreational, residential and commercial developments. He felt councillors didn't have the information they needed about the area before Monday's vote.

"Whether we can revisit the stadium proposal remains to be seen, but I am trying to get the robust kind of discussion we did not get at the Pan Am presentation."

Still on the short list are the unserviced airport lands, the cramped downtown and the complex west harbourfront area.

There doesn't seem to be a move afoot to overturn the vote, which would need a supporter to change his or her mind, with two-thirds of council support.

Confederation Park is big, undeveloped, with highway access and waterfront views; but it also has noise and odours due to the QEW, has limited "legacy" impact due to its distance from population and transit, and needs upgraded water and sewer servicing.

But Councillor Brian McHattie, who supported Collins, says all three remaining sites have problems, so the list must be expanded. Downtown likely doesn't have a site big enough, housing is planned for the west harbour, and the airport is too far away.

Terry Whitehead, who opposed the Collins motion and is on the local community advisory committee for the bid, wants more creative ideas such as building atop Bernie Arbour Stadium and relocating its current activities.

He worries about the looming deadline to put a site forward, but says site selection need not be perfected during the bidding process.

"It's a bit of a game. You can change the location after a decision has been rendered, as I understand it, but you need something to go forward," he said.

Councillor Tom Jackson, who backed Chad Collins' motion to drop Confederation Park due to the loss of greenspace, said many National Football League stadiums are in suburbs outside the city the team represents. He likes the airport, south Mountain and west harbour, but doesn't want to rule out an Ivor Wynne retrofit.

Other Collins supporters, such as Sam Merulla and Bernie Morelli, likewise have no interest in repeating the vote on Confederation Park.

Morelli is waiting on staff to report back on the three remaining options before picking his preferred site. Merulla says the list should be expanded to include Turner Park, at Rymal and Upper Wentworth.

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The article above pretty much spilled the beans......Hamilton to host the track and field event for the new stadium.

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Score one for T.O. 2015 bid

Pan Am contenders no-shows for presentations to voting delegates

January 16, 2009

John Kernaghan

The Hamilton Spectator

http://www.thespec.com/News/Local/article/497134

Toronto 2015's Pan Am bid scored a shutout last weekend.

The bid's international competitors for the 5,000-athlete showcase failed to take advantage of a prime lobbying opportunity before the Caribbean Association of National Olympic Committees (CANOC).

Bid president Jagoda Pike said Canada's delegation had exclusive time at the group's general assembly, which includes about half of the delegates who will vote for the host city later this year.

"We were the only ones to present," said Pike of the meeting of CANOC in Curacao.

Pan Am contenders Lima, Peru and Bogota, Colombia were invited to make presentations to 25 countries, about 20 of them members of the Pan American Sports Organization (PASO) which will award the 2015 Games.

"They told me they were coming," explained CANOC chairperson Steve Stoute, "but they didn't show up."

He estimated around 40 delegates, about half of the 80 PASO votes, heard the Toronto 2015 pitch on behalf of Hamilton and other Golden Horseshoe municipalities.

Stoute said the only plausible reason for the absence of the two South American contenders is that "they think everyone in the Caribbean will vote for Canada."

Pike said her delegation was able to get lots of lobbying in, noting "we were very well received."

Hamilton's Dr. Gene Sutton, who was Canada's chef de mission at the 2003 Pan Ams, called the no-shows a big surprise.

"The Caribbean vote is critical," she said.

Chris Rudge, CEO of the Canadian Olympic Committee, attended the CANOC meetings and stressed "opportunities like this to directly speak to and share ideas with voting delegates don't come around that often."

But, he pointed out, Canada's bid through Toronto 2015 can't worry about what the opposition is doing.

"We've got to focus on our own bid and I think we're in pretty good shape."

The Toronto 2015 delegation was building on Canadian strength in the Caribbean at the CANOC assembly. The Canadian Olympic Committee and Commonwealth Games Canada run sports and development programs throughout the region.

Canada will press its advantage further in July when the first Caribbean Games are held in Trinidad.

A combination of federal and provincial organizations will help with accreditation technology and volunteer programs for the inaugural competition.

The Pan Am Games have not been in North America since the 1999 showcase in Winnipeg. They will be staged in Guadalajara, Mexico, in 2011, following the 2007 Games in Rio and 2003 events in the Dominican Republic.

The competing cities must submit bid books by April 30 with site evaluations in the spring and a vote sometime next fall.

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Score one for T.O. 2015 bid

Pan Am contenders no-shows for presentations to voting delegates

January 16, 2009

John Kernaghan

The Hamilton Spectator

http://www.thespec.com/News/Local/article/497134

Toronto 2015's Pan Am bid scored a shutout last weekend.

The bid's international competitors for the 5,000-athlete showcase failed to take advantage of a prime lobbying opportunity before the Caribbean Association of National Olympic Committees (CANOC).

Bid president Jagoda Pike said Canada's delegation had exclusive time at the group's general assembly, which includes about half of the delegates who will vote for the host city later this year.

"We were the only ones to present," said Pike of the meeting of CANOC in Curacao.

Pan Am contenders Lima, Peru and Bogota, Colombia were invited to make presentations to 25 countries, about 20 of them members of the Pan American Sports Organization (PASO) which will award the 2015 Games.

"They told me they were coming," explained CANOC chairperson Steve Stoute, "but they didn't show up."

He estimated around 40 delegates, about half of the 80 PASO votes, heard the Toronto 2015 pitch on behalf of Hamilton and other Golden Horseshoe municipalities.

Stoute said the only plausible reason for the absence of the two South American contenders is that "they think everyone in the Caribbean will vote for Canada."

Pike said her delegation was able to get lots of lobbying in, noting "we were very well received."

Hamilton's Dr. Gene Sutton, who was Canada's chef de mission at the 2003 Pan Ams, called the no-shows a big surprise.

"The Caribbean vote is critical," she said.

Chris Rudge, CEO of the Canadian Olympic Committee, attended the CANOC meetings and stressed "opportunities like this to directly speak to and share ideas with voting delegates don't come around that often."

But, he pointed out, Canada's bid through Toronto 2015 can't worry about what the opposition is doing.

"We've got to focus on our own bid and I think we're in pretty good shape."

The Toronto 2015 delegation was building on Canadian strength in the Caribbean at the CANOC assembly. The Canadian Olympic Committee and Commonwealth Games Canada run sports and development programs throughout the region.

Canada will press its advantage further in July when the first Caribbean Games are held in Trinidad.

A combination of federal and provincial organizations will help with accreditation technology and volunteer programs for the inaugural competition.

The Pan Am Games have not been in North America since the 1999 showcase in Winnipeg. They will be staged in Guadalajara, Mexico, in 2011, following the 2007 Games in Rio and 2003 events in the Dominican Republic.

The competing cities must submit bid books by April 30 with site evaluations in the spring and a vote sometime next fall.

Incredible as the Bogota 2015 committee might be a two hour flight at the very most from that meeting in Curacao. Basically you can say they might have indeed conceded the Bid to Toronto considering 20 votes are in the Caribbean and there is certainly a Canada and probably an American Vote coming to Toronto 2015. That would make a majority right there as there are 42 votes . Who knows Mexico and the Central American Countries might indeed vote for Toronto as well. Could it be some signs of Financial weakness for Lima and Bogota ? I wonder if St Pierre Island has a Vote LOL.

Jim jones

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Why the hell are they allowing Hamilton to host what's considered the most prestigious event Track & Field? I don't know about this bid. Let's just use Toronto's name meanwhile, the big events aren't even hosted in the city. Pretty dumb. We should have just let Hamilton bid for the Pan Am Games themselves then, let's see if it would have been more difficult for them.

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New Ivor Wynne 2015 finalist

January 17, 2009

John Kernaghan

The Hamilton Spectator

http://www.thespec.com/Sports/article/497798

Hamilton is poised to cash in on gilt-edged Pan American Games opportunities led by a 27,000-seat stadium to replace decaying Ivor Wynne Stadium.

The new sporting jewel would stage track and field for the 2015 showcase, then deliver a legacy as home of the Tiger-Cats and elite and recreational athletes.

Despite city-hall squabbles, Hamilton is identified as a prime location for a stadium.

Toronto 2015, as the Golden Horseshoe-wide bid is called, has a mandate to engage municipalities from Oshawa to St. Catharines, points out bid president Jagoda Pike.

And bid chair David Peterson is clear that Hamilton is a vital part of the bid.

That could mean the stadium, and a 50-metre pool and velodrome valued at $220 million.

In terms of the $150-million, 27,000-seat stadium, Hamilton would have to step up with $66 million to make it happen, while the bid company would cover the remainder plus operating expenses during the Pan Am Games.

Hamilton will submit a preferred site to Toronto 2015 in early March after city council receives a detailed analysis of three short-listed sites.

It will consider financial, social and environmental aspects of the sites.

But it is paramount that the preferred site satisfy international standards and the comfort and convenience of athletes attending the Games.

SHORT LIST

These sites remain on the city's list of sites still under consideration.

* West Harbourfront

Industrial lands at the west end of Barton Street between North Queen Street and Tiffany Street.

Sports

For: Dramatic setting for sport spectacle with bay backdrop.

Against: Difficult vehicular access for 27,000 fans.

Games

For: Satisfies need for track and field centre for Golden Horseshoe, fulfills transformation mandate in Games mission.

Against: Distance and accessibility from Toronto, where athletes village will likely be based.

City

For: Chance to transform a neighbourhood and provide a link from waterfront to downtown.

Against: Expensive to service in terms of roads or new transit and upgrading of water mains and sanitary sewers.

Long term

For: Can invigorate an area of the city and increase recreational sport capacity as a multi-purpose facility.

Against: Could be expensive to operate if not enough revenue streams are developed.

* Downtown Hamilton

Vacant or under-developed lands in vicinity of intersections of York Boulevard and Bay Street or Rebecca and John streets.

Sports

For: Central location as a gathering spot for athletes and fans.

Against: Little novelty value in location to pull in fans.

Games

For: Fulfills elite and recreational sport legacy mandate.

Against: Distance for athletes to travel from athletes village.

City

For: Provides economic stimulation, sparks redevelopment.

Against: Could take up space more appropriate for other development.

Long term

For: Becomes home to pro, amateur athletes and recreational athletes for several generations.

Against: Might be seen as intrusive after glow of Games, pricey to maintain without multi-use and revenue from parking.

* Airport lands

Undeveloped lands north of John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport.

Sports

For: Access to airport, access for fans from several directions.

Against: Distance from amateur, recreational users.

Games

For: Less complicated development than other sites.

Against: Distance from athletes village.

City

For: Would spark infrastructure development to benefit local businesses and airport.

Against: Little symbolic or image factor, would limit other commercial development in area.

Long term

For: Supporting revenue from parking to cover operating costs.

Against: Little value in naming rights, limited recreational use.

SECONDARY SITES

These sites have been considered and assessed, but are not on the current preferred short list. Some might make it back into the process as Games staff have suggested they will bring a longer list back to council to look at.

* Pier 8

The site at the foot of James Street is limited by poor traffic access, and the expense of water and sewer connections, while enjoying waterfront location with high symbolic value.

Bayfront precinct - the area north of Barton Street between Wellington Street and Sherman Avenue - has good road access and water service.

But it would be hurt by the industrial contamination to be cleaned up, and would be a limiting factor in taking up key land for industrial redevelopment.

* Confederation Park

Though it has been voted off, it might return due to advantages of public land, highway access, waterfront esthetics, ongoing revenue prospects, symbolic and image value. Disadvantages are odours and dust from industrial areas and the expense of extending water and sewer service.

* West End gateway

The area around Chedoke Civic Golf Club enjoys a substantial amount of publically owned land. It would require much of the golf course to develop and would fly in the face of economic development projects in adjoining lands like the Innovation Park.

* Greenfield precincts

These include eastern Stoney Creek near Fifty Road and the QEW, the Nash neighbourhood north of Green Mountain Road and west of Centennial Parkway, Mud Street and Paramount Drive, Glanbrook Industrial Park and Clappison's Corners industrial park in Flamborough.

Various commercial, residential and park development pretty much rules out stadium development that would have little symbolic impact anyway.

* Ivor Wynne Stadium

The existing home of the Tiger-Cats, along with adjoining Brian Timmis Stadium. It covers only 5.45 hectares (13.5 acres), shy of the eight hectares (20 acres) needed for a stadium with 400-metre track and football field and adjoining 400-metre training track. The site will have greater value to the city if sold as commercial or residential real estate.

David Adames, the Tourism Hamilton executive director who is riding herd on Hamilton's Pan Am components, says the key is delivering a site that helps win the bid.

He must supply general information about the site - location, seating and transportation links etc. - with an eye to pleasing officials of the Pan American Sports Organization.

Assuming the board of Toronto 2015, which is not yet struck, approved the Steeltown location for a bid book due to PASO April 30, evaluation teams would visit Hamilton and require more detail in May or June.

It is unclear yet when Hamilton will have to make a financial commitment to its 44 per cent share.

A location for the Hammer listed in the bid book is no guarantee that site would be written in stone. It's common in the bid process for venues to change location later in the process.

The only immediate reservation Hamilton might raise is the distance from a Toronto athletes village to Hamilton.

PASO delegate Steve Stoute of Barbados, who is familiar with southern Ontario, said the drive might cause some pause, but noted venues at Rio 2007 were as much as two hours away.

Edited by Apple

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Dude, just what Toronto's gonna host anyway? Squash and Bowling? <_<

Ok, we know the whole Golden Horseshoe is bidding but it is starting to look like Toronto is just lending the name and the focus of the games will be mostly in Hamilton.

Is the city of Toronto even working on projects of venues and other facilities?

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Most of the venues for Toronto are already built, Roger's Centre (opening/closing ceremony and baseball), ACC (basketball and perhaps boxing), Direct Energy Centre (gymnastics), BMO Field (soccer), etc.

Toronto likely host:

Basketball

Baseball

Soccer

Gymnastics

Opening and Closing ceremony

Sports likely outside of Toronto:

Athletics

Cycling

Swimming

Canoeing, rowing, etc

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I just feel like we are deceiving the international community into thinking this is a Toronto bid when really its not.

Our 2008 Olympic bid had sports being hosted outside the Toronto area, but it was the lower profile sports.

This Pan Am bid is leaning differently. We are deceiving everyone with this bid and the name of it. I don't like that kind of **** to be honest.

Hamilton should have went and bid for this on their own instead of riding on Toronto's name. That's pretty sad in my books.

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If you look back you will see Hamilton was pushing for the 2015 Pan Am bid on it's own first. Than Premier Dalton thought of a Golden Horseshoe bid and Toronto jumped at it.

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If you look back you will see Hamilton was pushing for the 2015 Pan Am bid on it's own first. Than Premier Dalton thought of a Golden Horseshoe bid and Toronto jumped at it.

Yeah, I think it would have been best if Hamilton went for it on its own. I just don't like the fact that Toronto is being used right now. We're not really getting anything new out of this I think.

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Hamilton accounts for about 25% of the $1 billion total budget ($250 million). Probably another quarter or more for GTA and Niagara region so there's about $400 million or so for Toronto. I'm sure York and University of Toronto will get some goodies and renovation for Rogers Centre.

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I just feel like we are deceiving the international community into thinking this is a Toronto bid when really its not.

Our 2008 Olympic bid had sports being hosted outside the Toronto area, but it was the lower profile sports.

This Pan Am bid is leaning differently. We are deceiving everyone with this bid and the name of it. I don't like that kind of **** to be honest.

Hamilton should have went and bid for this on their own instead of riding on Toronto's name. That's pretty sad in my books.

Here is the problem thou. Hamilton does not have an internationally recognized profile in South America or the Caribbean.Hamilton 2010 certainly suffered in that department vs New Delhi India for the Commonwealth Games Bid.

Toronto is very well known in the South America and the Caribbean . You have Venues from Hamilton on past Toronto towards for Kingston . PASO does not except a region for a Title of a bid for the Host it only accepts a City. With Rogers Centre, BMO field, the ACC and the Arena the Toronto Marlees play in as probably venues there is enough there to have this titled a Toronto 2015 bid. Where would the Brazilians fly into for 2015 ? Hamilton ?

If you have Athletes housed at York University then they are in greater Toronto and certainly there are going to be more places outside of Toronto proper hosting events for this bid.

Jim jones

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Hamilton does not have an internationally recognized profile in South America or the Caribbean.Hamilton 2010 certainly suffered in that department vs New Delhi India for the Commonwealth Games Bid.

I don't believe this is a real problem for Hamilton and lots of other cities bidding for the Panams. We're talking about the 'not-so-healthy' Pan American Games. :D

Cities like, Cali (Colombia) and Mar del Plata (Argentina) aren't that famous even here in South America and neither are the largest and mos important cities in their countries. But they both hosted the games in '71 and '95 respectively.

It seems PASO isn't looking for glamour for their games, just a city where the events can take place.

I'm sure Hamilton, Halifax, Victoria, Ottawa or even Yellowknife wouldn't have problems hosting the Pan American games. Iqaluit should give a shot at the Winter Panams if they're ressurected. :lol:

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I don't believe this is a real problem for Hamilton and lots of other cities bidding for the Panams. We're talking about the 'not-so-healthy' Pan American Games. :D

Cities like, Cali (Colombia) and Mar del Plata (Argentina) aren't that famous even here in South America and neither are the largest and mos important cities in their countries. But they both hosted the games in '71 and '95 respectively.

It seems PASO isn't looking for glamour for their games, just a city where the events can take place.

I'm sure Hamilton, Halifax, Victoria, Ottawa or even Yellowknife wouldn't have problems hosting the Pan American games. Iqaluit should give a shot at the Winter Panams if they're ressurected. :lol:

Well yes you are right that Mar del Plata and Cali don't have a fame factor but I think with the Golden Horseshoe it is really a deal of putting the most known of the Golden Horseshoe Cities as the Candidate City . It would be similar to a City 60 miles down the road from Rio and all the communities including Rio in the region having venues for the games . If you had Harri Barra 2015 people first ask where is that . Oh it is in Brazil 60 miles outside of Rio. with Toronto or Rio there is not explaining where it is at. Hamilton 2015 people might think it was in the Bahamas or something .

The Games can certainly be in Smaller places still but unlike what was stated here the Pan Am Games does not need a 50000 to 100000 seat stadium . It just happened that Rio had that for 2007. Maracana was not built for the Pan Am Games JH stadium was and it only had 45000 seats for 2007 which is the largest stadium to host the games main event.

A 30000 seat athletics stadium in the golden horseshoe area would due. Toronto the city will not be building venues for this.

They have a great deal covered with the inventory at hand.

Prior to Rio 2007 30000 seats in the Dominican Republic for 2003 and less for track in Winnipeg for 1999. Winter Games well tough one LOL.

jim jones

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Here's what Toronto will get......

Toronto in line for Pan Am athletes village if Games bid successful

Last Updated: Monday, January 19, 2009 | 8:54 AM ET

CBC News

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/toronto/story/200.../19/pan-am.html

The final submission for the Golden Horseshoe 2015 Pan Am Games bid is still a few months away, but if the bid is successful the city of Toronto could be in line for one of the biggest prizes.

In anticipation of winning the Games, the organizing committee will release within the next few weeks a list of where the hundreds of millions of dollars for new athletic and housing facilities would be spent.

As many as four new swimming pools would be built, along with other facilities to accommodate track and field and other sports. The venues would be spread across the Golden Horseshoe, from Niagara to Durham.

But the biggest prize would be the athletes village, and one source has told CBC News that the village would be built in Toronto, either on the West Don Lands or at York University.

The total cost of the village would be close to $1 billion.

The president of the Pan Am bid, Jagoda Pike, said the other regions would also benefit. The new facilities would be spread across the region and mean an investment of a further $1 billion.

"I think folks understand they can't have [everything] they would like. There's a longer wish list than there is money to fund it. But so far it's been very constructive," she said.

The new sports infrastructure would also help boost the economy in the Golden Horseshoe.

The final bids are due to be submitted to the organizing committee by April.

The final decision on which city will get the 2015 Games is due this fall.

The Golden Horseshoe bid is up against three South American cities: Bogota, Colombia; Caracas, Venezuela; and Lima, Peru.

If the Ontario bid is successful construction could start in the spring of 2010.

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