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World Athletics championships which TOOK place in Paris were a real success in matter of audience and spectactors(more than 550000 people 93% of the tickets offered).

Read that and you will see for IAAF theses championship were a real godsend.

http://www.iaaf.org/WCH03/news/Kind=2/newsId=23105.html

There were an impact on the world coverage

And we don't need any lessons from

a country which was  unable to host the WAC in 2005,thanks to Helsinki :idea:

Otherwise syndicate which demonstrate were in favour of the Olympics,they supported it and you could see when they demonstration posters and tee shirt with Paris 2012.

And you know in France we don't care about british,people have their problems;and wherever you go in continental europe Uk is criticized for the same reason:their egoism an their conservatism.

Stop doing the work of the Commission you are not here to judge and don't be stupid with your tabloids which put in your head bullshit,you are like brainless.Commission  took it in consideration.

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And you know in France we don't care about british,people have their problems;and wherever you go in continental europe Uk is criticized for the same reason:their egoism an their conservatism.

It's nice to know we annoy everyone so much, especially those on the other side of the English Channel. We wouldn't want it any other way.

:P

Nah, just kidding.

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For there is no antagonism between french and english,there are  300 000 French in England and 300 000 british in France,for me it is the media which used this antagonism,I was astonished  the way i was host in London,i waited for more racism against frenchies it was not the case...it is the same here british people which live here are hosted well.

Sometimes for rugby matches there is an antagonism but that's all,just the games.

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Interesting discussion! which leads me to post an equally interesting article from the BBC's Paris correspondent, Caroline Wyatt, on the differences between Paris and London and the British and the French!

Paris is the most beautiful city in the world, especially on a summer's evening, when a golden light seems to glow from the rooftops.

This week I walked by the River Seine and watched the Eiffel Tower begin its hourly night-time sparkle - an extravaganza of light, a spectacle that never fails to inspire in me a childish delight.

Beauty, simply for its own sake

All the more so because the illumination serves no practical purpose at all. It's done quite simply because it is beautiful.

That evening I arrived for dinner with friends, rhapsodising about my walk there, and apologising profusely for being late. It was 2200 and I'd been held up at work.

Etienne, a lawyer, was understanding about the lateness, though not about my hymn of praise to Paris.

"Paris? Yes, it's beautiful," he agreed. "But it's a museum, or maybe a mausoleum. It's dead. It hasn't changed in years. I prefer London. It's dynamic and it's vibrant."

The next day I discovered two friends were leaving Paris. Neither could find a job, so, like many young French, they decided to try London instead.

"You can make your own luck there," they told me.

Picturesque

That plaintive cry - about the lack of dynamism in France, the red tape, and high unemployment - is one I heard often as the debate about the EU Constitution split this nation, dividing Paris from the provinces, and the elite from the working class.

This week I found myself in the fishing village of Etaples, asking why three-quarters of the people there voted "No" in the referendum.

 They were afraid of your Anglo-Saxon working hours being brought here, and of French values being lost

Mayor Marcel Guerville

It was the sort of village to delight an English heart - a picturesque main square, where town-hall employees were diligently perfecting the blossoming flowerbeds.

Not a youth in a hoodie in sight. Nor the anonymous chain-stores of most English high streets.

Instead, the shops in an orderly row - the baker, the grocer, the fishmonger, a few bars and for the very last order of all, the undertakers. All family-run businesses, each handed down the generations.

Yet the Socialist mayor of the village, Marcel Guerville, told me despairingly of his failed campaign to persuade his village to vote "Yes" for Europe's future.

"They were afraid," he said. "Afraid of your Anglo-Saxon working hours being brought here, and of French values being lost. We look at your privatised railways, and we don't want that happening here."

He told me that behind the beautiful façade, 17% of people in Etaples were out of work - the young abandoning the village to seek their fortune elsewhere, giving up the fishing boats that had sustained families for centuries.

Remembrance of things past

Some blame Europe for their plight. Jean-Francois Wacogne chose to run the fishermen's co-operative restaurant, les Pecheurs d'Etaples, rather than follow his father and grandfather to sea.

The French do not want a rail system like Britain's

Not much of a future, he told me, with the EU busy banning fishing. Yet he voted "Yes" in the referendum - and said that in his heart of hearts, he knew France had to change. To become a little more dynamic, a little less reliant on the state.

As we chatted, the crustaceans I'd seen swimming happily in their tank were being piled high on silver platters, their shells expertly bisected in the hot kitchen before being delivered with a flourish to the table.

Yet all the lunchtime customers cracking open their lobsters and crabs seemed to be English - there to enjoy what we see as the gloriously French way of life.

Visiting idyllic seaside villages that remind us of Britain in the 1950s, where everyone knows their neighbour and everything stops for lunch, a post-prandial lull settling on the deserted sunlit streets.

It's a way of life that we envy and sometimes hanker after. And it struck me that the cross-channel rivalry revived by this week's bitter political insults is all about envy - niggling away beneath the surface on both sides.

The French want what we have - a dynamic economy, vibrant cities, and unemployment so low that it barely registers. A society where those who want to can succeed, and work as hard as they like in the job they choose.

But what the French don't want is to pay the price: less security, self-reliance rather than a state that provides.

Torn

And we want what they have. A society that values family and friends above work. A society in which people choose to spend time with their friends and their children, rather than at the office or travelling to work. A society in which crime is low, hospitals can cope, and trains actually work.

Yet as they look across the channel, the French are torn between envy and fear. What they fear is losing the state that takes such good care of them - even if it can no longer afford it.

And what France must now decide is whether to follow in perfidious Albion's wake - or risk becoming a museum.

A very beautiful museum, but still a place that foreigners visit to remember times past, and to admire the facades of the sleepy villages bathed in the glow of the dying sun.

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This article seems to combine two typically British press attitudes: more British self-depracation and frog-bashing all at the same time. Goodness me, the UK has some lovely corners - I'm just about to watch "A Picture of Britain" on BBC1 - a great series:

A Picture Of Britain

And France too. France has every kind of terrain needed to keep the tourists rolling in (except a desert!). That's why the French don't need to go too far on holiday, but this kind of journalism seems to exaggerate the point a little. Although it picks up on some interesting points: there are many reasons why France, especially rural France, is becoming seen as a past way of life. And maybe the French social system has helped it avoid the closure of small shops. This means, De Gaulle's remarks about the British being a nation of shopkeepers can now be applied to his own country!!

This article was a badly disguised attack on France, which is paying for this way of life through the Common Agricultural Policy, subsidised by all European countries. I think the journalist was trying to write her own parable to support the dismantling of the CAP. Just an opinion, so no hate mail, please!!!

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World Athletics championships which TOOK place in Paris were a real success in matter of audience and spectactors(more than 550000 people 93% of the tickets offered).

Read that and you will see for IAAF theses championship were a real godsend.

http://www.iaaf.org/WCH03/news/Kind=2/newsId=23105.html

There were an impact on the world coverage

And we don't need any lessons from

a country which was  unable to host the WAC in 2005,thanks to Helsinki :idea:

Otherwise syndicate which demonstrate were in favour of the Olympics,they supported it and you could see when they demonstration posters and tee shirt with Paris 2012.

And you know in France we don't care about british,people have their problems;and wherever you go in continental europe Uk is criticized for the same reason:their egoism an their conservatism.

Stop doing the work of the Commission you are not here to judge and don't be stupid with your tabloids which put in your head bullshit,you are like brainless.Commission  took it in consideration.

Oh yes, that well-known tabloid the Daily Telegraph. Don't tell me who's dealing in bullshit, because I can work that out for myself thank you very much.

The fact is that the World Championships of 2003 were not the unadulterated success you claim them to be. You're not interested in debate. You're only interested in rubbishing everyone else.

Tell me, when is the aquatics complex going to be built? 2009? 2011? Never? Paris ain't exactly squeaky clean on that score, are they? Or is that something else you're just going to ignore in an arrogant manner?

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Bow, thank you for posting that article/editorial from the BBC correspondent in Paris - as an American who unfortunately has yet to visit either Paris or London, it's fascinating to read about both cities through the eyes of others.
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At this moment i see London Bid stronger than ever..look right.

NY- can win, but it would be only if the european cities are looking 2016, they are not going to win because the quality of the bid.

I have to disgaree....NYC does in fact have a strong technical bid

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At this moment i see London Bid stronger than ever..look right.

NY- can win, but it would be only if the european cities are looking 2016, they are not going to win because the quality of the bid.

I have to disgaree....NYC does in fact have a strong technical bid

at this stage of the bid, the scandals with the stadium have made look smaller the other aspect of the bid.

im not saying that NY2012 is dead, but the stage and situations of the race have changed..

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At this moment i see London Bid stronger than ever..look right.

NY- can win, but it would be only if the european cities are looking 2016, they are not going to win because the quality of the bid.

I have to disgaree....NYC does in fact have a strong technical bid

at this stage of the bid, the scandals with the stadium have made look smaller the other aspect of the bid.

im not saying that NY2012 is dead, but the stage and situations of the race have changed..

first off there has been no "scandal" and yes I agree that the stadium issue was bad for the bid, but the way they rebounded was very good (and the best thing they could possibly do in the awkaward situation)....this will help get the city to the final rounds of voting and save their face for 2016 (which they are expressing they will in fact bid for if they lose 2012)....

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Here's the thing.  All those who have studied the existing bids are already familiar with the boring Stade de France and the equally nonexistent London Stadium.  I imagine NYC is holding back on the knockout renderings of the new Mets-Olympic stadium until Singapore so at least there is something fresh; something to take one's breath away.
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Guest ryan04
also maybe some IOC members will be impressed that NYC can keep it toegether during a crisis. Did we not come up with a new OLYMPIC stadium 72 hours after the bid was decleared "dead"
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also maybe some IOC members will be impressed that NYC can keep it toegether during a crisis. Did we not come up with a new OLYMPIC stadium 72 hours after the bid was decleared "dead"

so this is a epic history!!...the history about an ambitious team that find a solution in 72 hours when everyone else said the bid was dead.

Sounds stupid.

Ryan, no vanaglories la mediocre solucion de NY2012, si fueran tan ambiciosos y astutos, nada del estadio hubiera pasado.

NY supporters will always found a new way to vanagloriate the mediocrity of their bid.

Baron, you can understand that im not saying this in a bad mood, you are the only NY supporter who uses his mind..

im so sick of this.

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At this moment i see London Bid stronger than ever..look right.

NY- can win, but it would be only if the european cities are looking 2016, they are not going to win because the quality of the bid.

I have to disgaree....NYC does in fact have a strong technical bid

at this stage of the bid, the scandals with the stadium have made look smaller the other aspect of the bid.

im not saying that NY2012 is dead, but the stage and situations of the race have changed..

first off there has been no "scandal" and yes I agree that the stadium issue was bad for the bid, but the way they rebounded was very good (and the best thing they could possibly do in the awkaward situation)....this will help get the city to the final rounds of voting and save their face for 2016 (which they are expressing they will in fact bid for if they lose 2012)....

I'm not sure NYC will get to the final rounds. The way the bid team have dealt with the situation will certainly ensure you're not embarrassed in the first round; a situation which was predicted by some after Plan A fell through. But there are three other bids equally as strong if not stronger than the Big Apple.

I agree with you about 2016. In a way 2012 can be seen as a useful trial run for NYC. I'm sure a strong bid will follow for 2016 and I for one would love to see a NYC Olympics. In a way NYC is in a win-win situation now, which is more than can be said for the other four cities, who will have to wait a while if they to a European city.

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