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The New American Race


LA84

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 I used to live in Wrigleyville and Edgewater before moving out here.

Were either of those sundown towns?

No - they are sections of Chicago

Ah, OK.  I'm not familiar with the names of Chicago's neighborhoods.  

I only ask because recently I learned that Illinois was famous (or infamous) for having a large number of sundown towns.  I learned that an upscale suburb of Chicago, Kenilworth, was a sundown town and to this day, has practically no black residents.

True - I think Kenilworth, Winnetka and Lake Forrest were at some point "officially" sundown towns.  Today they are still mostly lily white, mostly because it is the most expensive real estate around Chicago and is all old money.  

Anything south of Chicago is still extremely racists.  I grew up in a little town near Champaign and I remember when I was a kid, the cops in our town would pull over black drivers if they happened to drive through to check them out.  So I wouldn't be surprised to learn the Illinois had a lot of sundown towns.  .

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Also, I don't know if this was mentioned earlier...Doctoroff was also in Torino (even though it is unlikely he would lead the next bid if there is one)....there are definately signs that NYC is at the very least keeping the option for 2016 "open" at this moment

It's probably just as well he won't be heading any future bid - some of the accents and voices in the New York 2012 presentation were so harsh on the ear for a full 40 minutes, it was like being spoken to by an alarm clock first thing in the morning (I realise it's only a small point and perhaps I'm alone with this judgment!).  

:kungfu:  :unclesam:  :kungfu:

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Representing the proud city of Houston, Texas :)

Comon, Houston can get the games. It's not all about NYC and Chicago.

^_^

(Posted reasoning why Houston in other thread, but will post it here just to yeah)

I'm here to tout Houston, Texas for 2016! Woohoo.

Anyway, I've been to Chicago and New Yok City and I am impressed and amazed by both cities for their culture, their governments and in general, the state of their cities in this time of growing possibilities.

However, not to detract from the previous two cities mentioned, but Houston can possibily match them and offer an exciting Olympics that would be one that can be discussed for the ages.

A little background on Houston based on Wikipedia:

Houston is the largest city in the state of Texas and the fourth-largest in the United States. The city is also large in geographic area; it covers more than 600 square miles (1,558.4 km²) and is the county seat of Harris County—the third most populous in the country. Houston is one of 11 U.S. global cities as it is ranked "Gamma World City" by the Globalization and World Cities Study Group & Network.

As of the 2000 U.S. Census, Houston had a total population of 1.9 million (though a July 1, 2004 U.S. Census estimate placed the city's population at more than 2 million). The city is the heart of the Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown metropolitan area, which is the largest cultural and economic center of the Gulf Coast region and is the seventh-largest metropolitan area in the U.S. with a population of 5.2 million in ten counties.

Houston is world renowned for its energy (particularly oil) and aeronautics industries and for its ship channel. The Port of Houston is the sixth-largest port in the world. It is the busiest port in the United States in foreign tonnage and second in overall tonnage. Second only to New York City in Fortune 500 headquarters, Houston is the seat of the internationally-renowned Texas Medical Center, which contains the world's largest concentration of research and healthcare institutions.

Known for the vibrancy of its visual and performing arts, Houston's Theater District is ranked second in the country in the number of theatre seats in a concentrated downtown area per capita and has world-class visual and performing arts organizations. The city is also close to sunny beaches as well as one of the United States' largest concentrations of pleasure boats and tourist attractions.

Officially, Houston is nicknamed the "Space City" as it is home to NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, where Mission Control Center is located (because of this, "Houston" was the first word spoken on the moon).

A cosmopolitan city

Williams Waterwall in Uptown Houston.

Houston is a diverse and international city, in part because of its many academic institutions and strong biomedical, energy, manufacturing and aerospace industries. A port city, Houston also has large populations of immigrants from China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, India, Pakistan and Vietnam. This influx of immigrants is partially responsible for Houston having a population younger than the national average.

The fountain at night.

Houston has two Chinatowns, as well as the third largest Vietnamese American population in the United States. Recent redevelopment of Midtown from run-down to upscale has increased property values and property taxes, but has also forced some Vietnamese Americans into other areas of the city. The older Downtown Chinatown is also disappearing.

About 90 languages are frequently spoken in the area. Some neighborhoods with high populations of Vietnamese and Chinese residents have Chinese and Vietnamese street signs in addition to English ones. Houston has the second highest South African population in the United States, after Miami, Florida. The city is also noted for its large Nigerian population, counting about 100,000 native Nigerians as residents[7].

The Hispanic population in Houston is increasing as more and more people from countries of Latin America try to find work in Houston — Houston has the third largest Hispanic population in the United States.

Houston has the largest concentration of gay and lesbian (or LGBT) population in Texas—one of the largest in the country. The annual gay pride parade—one of the largest events in Houston—is held in June commemorating the struggle for gay liberation, gay rights, gay pride, and the Stonewall riots of the late 1960s in New York City. The event is held along Westheimer Road in the Montrose area. This area is also home to many gay establishments, such as restaurants, bars, nightclubs, and coffeehouses.

Aided by the popularity of the late hip-hop artist DJ Screw, Houston is known among youth, primarily in the South, as having its own distinctive style of hip-hop commonly known as screw music (referred to locally as simply "screw.") Many young Houstonians of all ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds in touch with local hip-hop culture may remember the advent of this form of Southern rap which began to take place around 1993, helping the city earn an appropriate nickname given by artists and fans: 'Screwston'

One of the world's economic power houses, a city with a vibrant cultural center waiting to be explored and discovered, it's a city that should desire and make a serious bid for the Olympics.

It's a Gamma World City, as explaine above, and is dabbling into entering the ranks of Beta with its growing geographic and international importance.

Furthermore, an Olympics here would bring a great cross-cultural appeal: The USOC and the IOC would be making a direct appeal to Latin American and South America, with masses of immigrants from those nations present in Southern Texas and Northern Mexico, close in comparison to the far off metros of New York, Chicago, and European nations.

In addition to that, the greater Houston Area encompasses areas with plenty of water to allow for beautiful scenery, and with certain satallite locations avaliable in Galveston Island (a beautiful city only 40 miles away on the Gulf of Mexico) it can be a tourist splendor when one's favorite event isn't being held.

Infastructural issues are vitally important to deal with as well, particularly in terms of Transportation.

With highways being constantly upgraded and new ones being built, Houston is a city always seeking to be able to maintain the needs of whatever it requires.

Furthermore, light rail lines are being expanded from the first section that connected Downtown Houston, the Texas Medical Center and Reliant Stadium.

Two international airports serve Houston, William P. Hobby and George Bush Intercontinental.

And of course, the stadiums.

Downtown Houston is served by Minute Maid Park and the Toyota Center, two start of the art facilities.

In terms of bigger stadirums, Rice University's is avaliable as well as Reliant Stadium.

Other stadium's include U of H's, and Robertson Stadium.

However, the greatest asset of Houston is the people. A vast array of different ethnicities and cultures live in Houston, including major groups of Nigerians, Vietnamese, Chinese, Japanese and the third-largest concentration of Hispanics in the nation.

The people are warm and inviting, a tribute to the laid-back nature of Texas and its star, Houston.

I'd like to extend an invitation to all visit this world-class city and see for yourself why Houston, Texas could serve as a great host for the 2016 Summer Olympics.

Shooting for the Stars, Houston 2016

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Hmmmm _ multiple postings of the same manifesto across a few different threads.

Just a word of advice _ that's not exactly gonna win you many converts to the Houston cause. Wait until a few rebuttals come (and believe me, they're sure to come) and then try to answer those back.

  :)

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2 - I feel in 2003 we were passed over for the intagibles, that,as we saw, New York apparently didn't have enough of.

The plan was solid and well thought out, and with one bid attempt under their wing, I believe Houston can pull of a very solid to impressive second bid.

3. Uggh, Atlanta. It was a nice olympics, but, comon. Houston!

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Which 'burb are you from?  I used to live in Wrigleyville and Edgewater before moving out here.

I am originally from Rockford but my grandparents lived in Blue Island before moving to the suburbs. My husband grew up somewhere on Cortez Street (southside not sure) and we lived in Niles before going out of state. Right now we are living in Arizona but my husband and I plan on moving back home in about a year or so.

Thanks for the suggestions on the graphic. I doubt my little personal graphic will hurt Chicago's chances, since it's only been posted here and on my personal journal, but when I make the smaller avatar version I'll be sure to take out the rings.

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Seems like we're being invaded by "New York had it's chance, let other cities bid" newbies in here...  :;):

Although it really sounds annoying to hear the same talking point presented in 10,000 different ways, welcome to the board anyway...  :unclesam:

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Where is the money coming from for all these new venues?

From the teams...

=> New York Yankees will shoulder their $800 million Yankee stadium

=> New York Mets will shoulder their $800 million Shea Stadium

=> The new Madison Square Garden will be shouldered fully by the Dolans, the owner of MSG. All $550million.

=> The Brooklyn Arena where the NJ Nets will move will be shouldered by the Forest Ratner Group of Companies

=> The Giants/Jets Stadium in the Meadowlands will be shared by the two teams, all $900 million of it.

=> The Newark Arena for the NJ Devils is a little different. The NJ Devils put in $100 million of the $300 million cost of the arena.

=> The new Nassau Coliseum is still in the works, but most likely, it will be the same. Wang shouldering most of the cost of the new arena.

Aside from the cost of the arenas and stadium, there are infrastructure incuded in it. Like exit ramps, parking spaces etc, those are going to be shouldered by the city or state, depending on which government entity controls the land.

Gone are the days of the near bankruptcy in the 70's. We've experienced an economic boom, so does the whole country, in the 90's. Although 9/11 brought the city and the country down to our knees, the city has rebounded very well. Tax rebates for NYC homeowners. The economy just keeps getting better.

The city had a $4 Billion surplus last fiscal year and expecting more this fiscal year. The State had a $2 Billion surplus last year, although it is expecting a deficit this year, first quarter for this fiscal year reported a $50 million surplus for the State because of the economic boom NYC is experiencing right now. We don't need to increase taxes to fund these projects. Although some of the infrastructure needed will be raised by city bonds, it will be an investment that will bear a lot fruits in the future.

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I've been perusing these threads and I'm wondering why there's so little commentary on San Francisco bidding in 2016?  Did they announce that they wouldn't do it?  My understanding is that Mayor Newsom and the San Francisco 49ers football team are actually very close to an agreement on the long-stalled new football stadium, which would then be the centerpiece of San Francisco's Olympic bid.

Curious as to what people here think or if I'm missing something.

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I've been perusing these threads and I'm wondering why there's so little commentary on San Francisco bidding in 2016?  Did they announce that they wouldn't do it?  My understanding is that Mayor Newsom and the San Francisco 49ers football team are actually very close to an agreement on the long-stalled new football stadium, which would then be the centerpiece of San Francisco's Olympic bid.

Curious as to what people here think or if I'm missing something.

The new SF-49ers deal has been on the drawing boards since 1998 when the voters passed a referendum approving the bonds.  However, the 49ers haven't just moved with it.  So, people here view it as they'll believe it when they see it.

Ann Cribbs, who headed the 2003 Bay Area bid, has said that she'll go by how the USOC plays it.  If the USOC informally decides that NYC or CHicago is what they want, then why even bother getting hepped about it -- from a SF p.o.v?  And she's right.  It'll happen when it happens.

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I've been perusing these threads and I'm wondering why there's so little commentary on San Francisco bidding in 2016?  Did they announce that they wouldn't do it?  My understanding is that Mayor Newsom and the San Francisco 49ers football team are actually very close to an agreement on the long-stalled new football stadium, which would then be the centerpiece of San Francisco's Olympic bid.

Curious as to what people here think or if I'm missing something.

The new SF-49ers deal has been on the drawing boards since 1998 when the voters passed a referendum approving the bonds.  However, the 49ers haven't just moved with it.  So, people here view it as they'll believe it when they see it.

Ann Cribbs, who headed the 2003 Bay Area bid, has said that she'll go by how the USOC plays it.  If the USOC informally decides that NYC or CHicago is what they want, then why even bother getting hepped about it -- from a SF p.o.v?  And she's right.  It'll happen when it happens.

Yes, but where does the speculation that the USOC is going to pick NYC or Chicago come from?  I know that the USOC is going to do things a bit differently - invite individual cities to submit a bid - but is there any reason to believe that they would not invite SF to do so?  As the runner up to NYC last time around, I would imagine SF would be one of the top contenders for the next time.  But it seems like a foregone conclusion around these parts that it will be NYC or Chicago.  Why?

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San Fran has received a fair amount of discussion time in the past, but I think that while many see it as one of the most internationally appealing cities in the US, their 2012 bid has the weakness of being very spread out

Chicago and NYC get more discussion time now because Chicago is the new kid on the block and thus as a bid is an unknown entity where as NYC is the defending national champion and has a bid that is well known around these parts.  Plus, Chicago made a big surprise when the mayor said he'd look into supporting a 2016 bid which is a 180 degree turn in his policies.  NYC has been coy about its Olympic future.  San Francisco has been somewhere in the middle.

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Yes, but where does the speculation that the USOC is going to pick NYC or Chicago come from?  

uhmmm...if New York City couldn't best Paris, London or Madrid last year, how would a Seattle or a Houston fare against Tokyo, or from what we hear, Madrid and Rome again?  Think about it.

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Yes, but where does the speculation that the USOC is going to pick NYC or Chicago come from?  

uhmmm...if New York City couldn't best Paris, London or Madrid last year, how would a Seattle or a Houston fare against Tokyo, or from what we hear, Madrid and Rome again?  Think about it.

I'm not talking about a Seattle or a Houston or (shudder) a Minneapolis.  There are a handful of US cities that can clearly compete on a global scale and San Francisco is definitely one of them.

This board can often be a great source for rumors, gossip, and information that hasn't yet hit the mainstream press.  But there's been hardly a peep about a 2016 SF bid and was just wondering why.  Specifically, I was wondering if it was because the people on this board had some information that made them honestly think that it's unlikely that SF would actually pursue a bid.

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Yes, but where does the speculation that the USOC is going to pick NYC or Chicago come from?  

uhmmm...if New York City couldn't best Paris, London or Madrid last year, how would a Seattle or a Houston fare against Tokyo, or from what we hear, Madrid and Rome again?  Think about it.

I'm not talking about a Seattle or a Houston or (shudder) a Minneapolis.  There are a handful of US cities that can clearly compete on a global scale and San Francisco is definitely one of them.

This board can often be a great source for rumors, gossip, and information that hasn't yet hit the mainstream press.  But there's been hardly a peep about a 2016 SF bid and was just wondering why.  Specifically, I was wondering if it was because the people on this board had some information that made them honestly think that it's unlikely that SF would actually pursue a bid.

Because as I said, SF is just waiting to see which way the USOC will go.  There just hasn't been much speculation in the city.  And frankly, all things being equal -- Stanford Stadium will no longer be there, and Moffett Field for the OV, I believe, is gone -- NYC would still hold the stronger suit.  But that isn't what you wanted to hear, is it?

What do you want to hear?

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Yes, but where does the speculation that the USOC is going to pick NYC or Chicago come from?  

uhmmm...if New York City couldn't best Paris, London or Madrid last year, how would a Seattle or a Houston fare against Tokyo, or from what we hear, Madrid and Rome again?  Think about it.

I'm not talking about a Seattle or a Houston or (shudder) a Minneapolis.  There are a handful of US cities that can clearly compete on a global scale and San Francisco is definitely one of them.

This board can often be a great source for rumors, gossip, and information that hasn't yet hit the mainstream press.  But there's been hardly a peep about a 2016 SF bid and was just wondering why.  Specifically, I was wondering if it was because the people on this board had some information that made them honestly think that it's unlikely that SF would actually pursue a bid.

dmfcsf,

Both Baron anf LA84 live in the Bay Area, and Baron did some work for SF's 2012 bid. If anyone would hear a whisper about SF having 2016 aspirations, they would, and they'd be the first to report it here. The fact there hasn't been much yet indicates, as they've said, that either SF is biding its time or just has no intentions of trying this time around.

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Yes, but where does the speculation that the USOC is going to pick NYC or Chicago come from?  

uhmmm...if New York City couldn't best Paris, London or Madrid last year, how would a Seattle or a Houston fare against Tokyo, or from what we hear, Madrid and Rome again?  Think about it.

I'm not talking about a Seattle or a Houston or (shudder) a Minneapolis.  There are a handful of US cities that can clearly compete on a global scale and San Francisco is definitely one of them.

This board can often be a great source for rumors, gossip, and information that hasn't yet hit the mainstream press.  But there's been hardly a peep about a 2016 SF bid and was just wondering why.  Specifically, I was wondering if it was because the people on this board had some information that made them honestly think that it's unlikely that SF would actually pursue a bid.

Because as I said, SF is just waiting to see which way the USOC will go.  There just hasn't been much speculation in the city.  And frankly, all things being equal -- Stanford Stadium will no longer be there, and Moffett Field for the OV, I believe, is gone -- NYC would still hold the stronger suit.  But that isn't what you wanted to hear, is it?

What do you want to hear?

You keep making assumptions about what I do or do not want to hear.  All I want to hear is information.  Truth, facts, rumor, innuendo, blind speculation or in between.  Your opinion about the relative quality of theoretical SF and NYC bids is duly noted, but I don't really care about who anyone thinks is better or worse than whoever.  

When do people think USOC will make an announcement?  Isn't it supposed to be really soon?  What form will that announcement take?  Will that announcement result in cities other than Chicago or NY making a big?  Will one of those other cities be SF?  If so, what changes to its 2012 bid would SF make for 2016?  What changes would they be expected to make?  How "spread out" is "too spread out"?  

I'd heard back in December that Newsom and the 49ers expected completing the long-delayed stadium deal in 2006.  Any news since then?  Obviously this could and should be part of an Olympics bid.  Does having Ueberroth (a Californian) in charge of the process for the USOC help SF or hurt?

With baseball gone, could PacBell/SBC/AT&T Park be used for anything?  Could the triathlon start from Alcatraz?  Where would/could an Olympic Village be located?  If equestrian in Monterey and rowing in Sacramento are to be moved elsewhere, where could they go?

Hope that helps.  This is the kind of stuff I want to hear.

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The fact there hasn't been much yet indicates, as they've said, that either SF is biding its time or just has no intentions of trying this time around.

Yeah, this sort of gets to the heart of my curiosity.  Which is it?  Is SF biding its time or are they not going to try?

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