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Can New Zealand host an Olympics?


Hachiko
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Western Australia is the Alberta of Australia ... Perth is light years ahead of of Durban on international city statues . .

I guess if you are from Perth, being the "Alberta of something" is a positive aspiration. For the rest of the world (well, excluding Manitoba), not so much.

And could you post some pictures of those internatinal city statues? Are those like busts of Shakespeare or something?

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Their economy is booming because of the bubbling crude. Oil that is. Black gold. Texas Tea.

If all you need for greatness is to be living above some fossil fuels... bring on Kazakhstan.

Exactly, a city must be a center for culture, art, economics, etc. to be a global city. Not just a result of oil drilling...

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  • 5 months later...
Call for Queenstown to bid for 2026 Winter Olympics

A marketing consultant is boldly suggesting Queenstown spearhead a New Zealand bid to host the 2026 Winter Olympics.

Queenstowner Bruce McGechan, who’s had snowsports marketing experience, says the resort should hold the Olympics because it’s shown through Winter Games NZ it can run “really good winter sports”.

“But just as important as the sporting side, it provides such a huge economic benefit to NZ, mainly in the form of tourism, that to hold an Olympics, if the costs are controlled, is almost a no-brainer.”

Destination Queenstown boss Graham Budd says he admires the vision, although the scale and ambition of it may initially appear daunting. He says it would be easy to dismiss the idea as too hard or unaffordable but it deserves appropriate consideration.

McGechan believes no other major event would have better spinoffs for the country.

He estimates NZ, if it hosted the event, could benefit from $5.6 billion of tourism and International Olympic Committee expenditure between 2026 and 2031.

“You have two billion people watching the Winter Olympics, 54,000 broadcast hours.

“One of the key things, if not the key thing, Tourism NZ does overseas is promote our incredible scenery.

“Imagine shots at the top of [Queenstown’s] Remarkables or Coronet Peak or the backside of Cardrona looking down towards Lake Wakatipu, through the incredible mountain ranges, you just can’t beat it.”

He’s completed a pre-feasibility study and hopes a full inquiry can be undertaken next year – most likely by the NZ Olympic Committee and Government funding agency Sport NZ.

If the study pans out, the NZOC would then lodge its full bid by 2018.

The IOC would then choose a host city and country in 2019.

Rather than go it alone, Queenstown could team up other venues – McGechan’s plumping for Auckland, NZ’s largest city.

Host cities currently provide 24,000 rooms during a Winter Olympics.

Queenstown has about 4600 rooms and Auckland 12,700.

Given four per cent growth a year, McGechan says the two centres could easily reach the target by 2026.

McGechan’s ambitious plan comes, however, as possible host cities for the 2022 Winter Olympics fall like flies.

Bids have been pulled from the likes of Sweden, Poland, Germany and Switzerland after $US51 billion was allegedly spent on the Olympics in Sochi, Russia, this year.

Only Beijing, China, and Almaty, Kazakhstan, remain in contention for 2022, leaving media to describe it as “the Olympics that no one seems to want”.

McGechan says each centre could host an athletes’ village, paid for by private developers who could turn them into residential accommodation.

Auckland could host most of the five ice rinks, costing $500m, required for the Games for the likes of ice hockey, curling and speed and figure skating, McGechan suggests.

Local skifields could accommodate alpine ski and snowboarding events – bar downhill skiing, which would require a new course.

McGechan says the main challenge would be building a bobsleigh, luge and skeleton track and ski jumping facility.

McGechan was sales and marketing manager for Cardrona Alpine Resort when it brought the first FIS World Cup snowboard event to NZ and built a Super-G course.

He was also involved when the biennial Queenstown- and Wanaka-based Winter Games NZ started in 2009.

A league of doubters hasn’t stopped the area hosting a FIS World Cup and hosting the Winter Games.

“We’ve proven we can hold big events like Rugby World Cup. So now, if the costs are coming down, we should be able to hold a Winter Olympics.”

And if the feasibility study says NZ can’t afford it? “I’d be happy,” he says. Source

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Call for Queenstown to bid for 2026 Winter Olympics

A marketing consultant is boldly suggesting Queenstown spearhead a New Zealand bid to host the 2026 Winter Olympics.

Queenstowner Bruce McGechan, who’s had snowsports marketing experience, says the resort should hold the Olympics because it’s shown through Winter Games NZ it can run “really good winter sports”.

“But just as important as the sporting side, it provides such a huge economic benefit to NZ, mainly in the form of tourism, that to hold an Olympics, if the costs are controlled, is almost a no-brainer.”

Destination Queenstown boss Graham Budd says he admires the vision, although the scale and ambition of it may initially appear daunting. He says it would be easy to dismiss the idea as too hard or unaffordable but it deserves appropriate consideration.

McGechan believes no other major event would have better spinoffs for the country.

He estimates NZ, if it hosted the event, could benefit from $5.6 billion of tourism and International Olympic Committee expenditure between 2026 and 2031.

“You have two billion people watching the Winter Olympics, 54,000 broadcast hours.

“One of the key things, if not the key thing, Tourism NZ does overseas is promote our incredible scenery.

“Imagine shots at the top of [Queenstown’s] Remarkables or Coronet Peak or the backside of Cardrona looking down towards Lake Wakatipu, through the incredible mountain ranges, you just can’t beat it.”

He’s completed a pre-feasibility study and hopes a full inquiry can be undertaken next year – most likely by the NZ Olympic Committee and Government funding agency Sport NZ.

If the study pans out, the NZOC would then lodge its full bid by 2018.

The IOC would then choose a host city and country in 2019.

Rather than go it alone, Queenstown could team up other venues – McGechan’s plumping for Auckland, NZ’s largest city.

Host cities currently provide 24,000 rooms during a Winter Olympics.

Queenstown has about 4600 rooms and Auckland 12,700.

Given four per cent growth a year, McGechan says the two centres could easily reach the target by 2026.

McGechan’s ambitious plan comes, however, as possible host cities for the 2022 Winter Olympics fall like flies.

Bids have been pulled from the likes of Sweden, Poland, Germany and Switzerland after $US51 billion was allegedly spent on the Olympics in Sochi, Russia, this year.

Only Beijing, China, and Almaty, Kazakhstan, remain in contention for 2022, leaving media to describe it as “the Olympics that no one seems to want”.

McGechan says each centre could host an athletes’ village, paid for by private developers who could turn them into residential accommodation.

Auckland could host most of the five ice rinks, costing $500m, required for the Games for the likes of ice hockey, curling and speed and figure skating, McGechan suggests.

Local skifields could accommodate alpine ski and snowboarding events – bar downhill skiing, which would require a new course.

McGechan says the main challenge would be building a bobsleigh, luge and skeleton track and ski jumping facility.

McGechan was sales and marketing manager for Cardrona Alpine Resort when it brought the first FIS World Cup snowboard event to NZ and built a Super-G course.

He was also involved when the biennial Queenstown- and Wanaka-based Winter Games NZ started in 2009.

A league of doubters hasn’t stopped the area hosting a FIS World Cup and hosting the Winter Games.

“We’ve proven we can hold big events like Rugby World Cup. So now, if the costs are coming down, we should be able to hold a Winter Olympics.”

And if the feasibility study says NZ can’t afford it? “I’d be happy,” he says. Source

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Such a pity. Between the existing lacklustre bidder line-up, and the Qatar cup conundrum, 2022 might, just might have been a hosting that the IOC, the federations and the broadcasters could have been persuaded to take the leap of faith in an out of season Kiwi bid.

Ah well, like everything about 2022... coulda, woulda, shoulda.

I expect this proposal to go the way of other similar ones that gave been put up over the years - nice idea, but quickly shot down by reality.

Edited by Count Rolsula
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Such a pity. Between the existing lacklustre bidder line-up, and the Qatar cup conundrum, 2022 might, just might have been a hosting that the IOC, the federations and the broadcasters could have been persuaded to take the leap of faith in an out of season Kiwi bid.

Ah well, like everything about 2022... coulda, woulda, shoulda.

I expect this proposal to go the way of other similar ones that gave been put up over the years - nice idea, but quickly shot down by reality.

Yeah, would have meant a lot of trouble with the season planning not only for football, but also for winter athletes, but on the other hand could have saved a lot of faces at FIFA especially.

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If NZ had taken a chance on 2022 it might have worked out quite well for the IOC and FIFA.

Kind of like Wife Swap.... Or not

While the idea is a long bow to draw, I still think it shouldn't be Queenstown- it should be focused on Chch with cooperation of nearby resorts. Heck- Kiwis are super innovative , I'm sure they'll find a way to repurpose the sliding center into some adventure attraction to add to its portfolio.

F*cking equator!

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Make it Christchurch, with Wanaka serving for the Men's Downhill if they can't do it near Christchurch.

As for the sliding centre, it will serve as a tourist attraction, much like Calgary's, but will also serve as the all important only sliding centre in the southern hemisphere, it will be well used by the Kiwis, Australians and other teams. In fact all snow venues can easily be used as training venues for various national teams during the winter off season (northern hemisphere's summer).

Queenstown would be nice, but it's just too small, not only in population, but areas to actually build new infrastructure. You could attempt a Lake Placid type deal where you put a permanent indoor arena (of large capacity), a dedicated speed skating oval and just do temporary venues for the others, but there's limited free space to actually have such a setup.

Just have it in Christchurch. The city could use a good rebuilding.

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I think its a shame NZ didn't put its hand up for a Winter Olympics in the 70s. Its not hard to imagine a Queenstown 76 Winter Olympics instead of Christchurch 74. Would have been a nice stop-gap for Oceania between Melbourne 1956 and Sydney 2000. I think Queenstown would have worked well in the era of Lake Placid and Innsbruck. It is just too small today. Whistler couldn't do it alone.

They would be foolish to leave out Chirstchurch , and even more foolish to expect a joint bid with Auckland (do these visionaries even do remote research before making these announcements?) Plus Chch has the narrative of a city in recovery - and the post-quake urban plan is focused on resilience and flexibility that would suit such an endeavour. But just a shame about seasonal inflexibility.

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Having lived in a year in Queenstown working for NZSki, I would say that Queenstown nor Wanaka can not really play a part in the Olympics

The ski resorts aren't suitable for Olympic level events, whilst neither the Remarkables nor Treble Cone are easily accessible and to make them so for an Olympic sized event would cause shocking environmental damage

CHRISTCHURCH would however be a suitable location with a great narrative.

Christchurch is suitably sized to allow for 4 facilities to be reused ... the speed skating rink could be used as either a) an exhibition centre like the Oval Lingotto, or B) a multi sport community centre like the Richmond Olympic Oval. The 1st Ice Hockey arena (10,000 seats)could be used by the Tactix Netball team whilst the Curling Arena (3,000 seats) could be used by the Red Devils. As there are proposed plans for a new Crusaders stadium, if something like the Forsyth Barr stadium, then this could be used for the Opening Ceremonies, then reconfigured into a 15,000 seat Figure Skating site with a curtain system like Copenhagen's Parken Stadium

Leaving the 2nd Ice Hockey Arena of 6,000 seats which can be relocated after the games

As for Alpine Events, Mt Hutt's vertical of 693m CAN be extended to 800m ... whilst Porter Heights has a vertical of 600m

And being a coastal city, extra accommodation can be 'parked' in the bay

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Leaving the 2nd Ice Hockey Arena of 6,000 seats which can be relocated after the games

this is where bringing in another city might actually work - if the rest of the ice venues were in Chch --- put the second ice hockey arena at Forsyth Barr in Dunedin. A slight concession - but it happens in the SOG with Football.

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There's 2 separate questions at play here..

1) Is New Zealand physically capable of putting up a suitable host city for bid? I don't know the answer to that one, but it's questionable at best. I think temporarily renamed Count Rosula has the right idea.. it sounds nice, but it'll probably get shot down by reality. Which leads me to..

2) Would said New Zealand bid get selected in a majority vote by the IOC? I don't see that happening anytime soon. I'm hearing you guys talk about leaps of faith and the 2022 issues with Qatar. I don't think you all grasp what a major change putting a WINTER Olympics in the Northern Summer is. The economics of it all make that an extremely tough sell, particularly for an event held once every 4 years. Are the members of the IOC and the respective Winter sports federations willing to take that much of a risk to put a Winter Olympics in the southern hemisphere? What are they going to get out of that? Will there be a long term legacy left after the Olympics are gone? I just don't see this all coming together in a manner where it makes sense for New Zealand (or any other southern hemisphere country) to get picked. Not to say it won't ever happen, but there has to be a big shift in attitude for this to work. That's a much bigger component of a New Zealand Olympics than putting together a venue plan. That's a futile endeavor until there's a willingness to embrace a Southern Winter Olympics. IMO, that's not happening anytime soon.

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The money involved in delivering a successful bid is phenomenal for New Zealand, not only in building venues configured for winter sports but the extra accommodation and transport/infrastructure links needed.

Auckland is bursting at the seams, and there are arguments already regrading the public transport plans and costs there.

New Zealand is capable of hosting only those smaller events, suitable to meet its needs in terms of infrastructure and finances.

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The money involved in delivering a successful bid is phenomenal for New Zealand, not only in building venues configured for winter sports but the extra accommodation and transport/infrastructure links needed.

Auckland is bursting at the seams, and there are arguments already regrading the public transport plans and costs there.

New Zealand is capable of hosting only those smaller events, suitable to meet its needs in terms of infrastructure and finances.

When I brought up the economics earlier, I meant more from the standpoint of the IOC and the Winter sport federations. Is it beneficial for them to put an Olympics in the Southern hemisphere and completely throwing off the calendar for a year (or more). Some folks think it's no big deal. I'd like to hear someone from NBC or FIS to tell me that one. To say nothing of the question of whether or not people will travel to a cold weather location during the Northern summer.

But yes, I agree with your last point.. the big prize might be too much for them. Perhaps a Winter Youth Olympics would be a good jumping off point for New Zealand? Or is even that too much?

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When I brought up the economics earlier, I meant more from the standpoint of the IOC and the Winter sport federations. Is it beneficial for them to put an Olympics in the Southern hemisphere and completely throwing off the calendar for a year (or more). Some folks think it's no big deal. I'd like to hear someone from NBC or FIS to tell me that one. To say nothing of the question of whether or not people will travel to a cold weather location during the Northern summer.

But yes, I agree with your last point.. the big prize might be too much for them. Perhaps a Winter Youth Olympics would be a good jumping off point for New Zealand? Or is even that too much?

It would be beneficial economics wise if it means the Northern Hemisphere athletes get dedicated training venues for specific winter sports.

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Lets not forget...New Zealand has very very little to show for it's presence at the Winter Olympics.

Yes we have the ski fields and the mountains, but winter snow sports are seen more as recreation and a holidays thing. Also it's more a "rich kids" sport.

There was an enthusiastic attempt at crunching the numbers in the late 90s but without Christchurch, just wouldn't work.

Like other members living in this part of the world have mentioned....It's just too big an undertaking, the weather cannot be guaranteed, and to be honest...We've got other problems to worry about like the massive infrastructure programs that are now taking place. All costs $$$billions.

Maybe the youth versions of the Olympics, but other than that, just not worth the expense for now.

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I'm not positive that hosting a winter games in the Northern Hemisphere's summer would really be as disastrous as some people have suggested. The objection for the opposite (summer games in Northern Hemisphere's winter) is based on worse ratings since kids are out of school and in Europe many people are taking time off from work. Doesn't that also make a winter games in summer MORE likely to get good ratings, though? There would be fewer ads from winter-specific companies, but the main sponsors are always companies like Coca Cola that don't care what the season is.

I also think the federations would likely be OK with a summer Olympics as well. The snow sports are not active much in the summer anyway, so their tournaments would likely be unaffected. Most ice hockey leagues are not active in the Northern Hemisphere's summer either, so leagues such as the NHL would probably be pleased with a winter games in the summer.

In general I think holding the winter games in the summer would cause much, much less disruption than hosting the summer games in winter.

Yes we have the ski fields and the mountains, but winter snow sports are seen more as recreation and a holidays thing. Also it's more a "rich kids" sport.

This is true for every country. In the lead-up to Sochi, an athlete near where I live complained about inadequate support for winter sports, and that her father was going to have to sell one of her three horses in order for her to continue her pro skiing career. There are few athletes who lift themselves out of poverty by skiing or snowboarding.

Like other members living in this part of the world have mentioned....It's just too big an undertaking, the weather cannot be guaranteed, and to be honest...We've got other problems to worry about like the massive infrastructure programs that are now taking place. All costs $$$billions.

I don't disagree, but it's also true of almost every other western country.

The actual sporting facilities make a lot more sense for New Zealand than most other countries in the Northern Hemisphere. (Other than a few temporary arenas, of course.) IF the broadcasters and federations would be OK with a southern bid, and IF New Zealand can figure out a way to make the hotels and transportation work, then New Zealand could potentially be a great host. A New Zealand games could take great advantage of being opposite season with both the professionals and tourists.

Vancouver built a bobsledding track that is infrequently used by the world's bobsledders, but it's a sure bet that the first one built in the summer hemisphere would get used a ton for opposite season training by the Northern athletes as well as NZ and Australia. New Zealand would also likely be able to attract opposite season tourists.

Edited by Nacre
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Just heard a story that the small Auckland Rail loop may be delayed until 2020 due to budget constraints so makes an Olympic hosting, whether Summer or Winter almost ridiculous if they can't plan and build a small rail link on time and budget.

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Just heard a story that the small Auckland Rail loop may be delayed until 2020 due to budget constraints so makes an Olympic hosting, whether Summer or Winter almost ridiculous if they can't plan and build a small rail link on time and budget.

Yeah, kind of old news on that...the decision to build the loop. Very fluid the way politics in Aucks operate...Anyway the redevelopers of the Downtown shopping centre are pushing ahead and building the tunnel section under it. When it comes to Auckland v Central Government, this timeframe is nothing.

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It would be beneficial economics wise if it means the Northern Hemisphere athletes get dedicated training venues for specific winter sports.

This is true, but it's still an expensive endeavor to build those facilities since they need to be at a world class competition level, not just acceptable for training standards. I have no doubt they would get used a few months out of the year, but does that mean it worth the expense?

I'm not positive that hosting a winter games in the Northern Hemisphere's summer would really be as disastrous as some people have suggested. The objection for the opposite (summer games in Northern Hemisphere's winter) is based on worse ratings since kids are out of school and in Europe many people are taking time off from work. Doesn't that also make a winter games in summer MORE likely to get good ratings, though? There would be fewer ads from winter-specific companies, but the main sponsors are always companies like Coca Cola that don't care what the season is.

I also think the federations would likely be OK with a summer Olympics as well. The snow sports are not active much in the summer anyway, so their tournaments would likely be unaffected. Most ice hockey leagues are not active in the Northern Hemisphere's summer either, so leagues such as the NHL would probably be pleased with a winter games in the summer.

In general I think holding the winter games in the summer would cause much, much less disruption than hosting the summer games in winter.

Are those people in Europe and North America going to be interested in watching (or attending) Winter sports though when the days are long and the weather is warm outside? That reasoning behind why the Summer Olympics are more valuable than the Winter isn't just based on a lack of alternatives during July and August. And the big sponsors are behind that as well. Showing Coca Cola ads to a large audience is one thing, but if you're going to use skiing and skiers to sell your product, that's a lot more difficult during that time of year.

As for the sport federations.. the NHL would probably be thrilled with that since they wouldn't have to suspend the season, but I doubt many of the others would be too happy. The figure skating calendar general goes from around August to April, but that's probably not ideal timing for an Olympics since you lose all that build up. Ditto with the snow sports. I doubt they'd want the Olympics to be a one-off at a very odd time of the year or else they lose all the hype and promotion that might surround the World Cup season that they'd be losing.

We've seen how much disruption is caused (at least in North America, maybe it's different elsewhere) when the Olympics are held outside their usual window, and that was only a month later than normal. I don't think a Summer Olympics is going to work as well as you think during the Northern Summer. People get genuinely interested in a Summer Olympics because there's a lead-up to it. If you lose that lead-up (and tough to artificially create one), they wouldn't get the viewership and interest they would for a Winter Olympics held in the Winter.

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