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Cbc Broadcast Of The Games


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Canadians, what do you think of CBC's broadcast of the Beijing games?

Honestly, I think it sucks :angry:

I was hoping to see some wrestling as there is a guy competing that I went to high school with. Is CBC broadcasting wrestling? No. What about Badminton? No. What about Greco Roman wrestling? No. :angry: Oddly enough, they will be broadcasting BMX cycling. When the hell did BMX cycling become important to broadcast?

They do have a number of clips on their website :) , however a lot of them don't have commentary. :angry:

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They don't seem to be really trying in these Games.....probably because they're losing the tv rights after Beijing to CTV/Rogers.

CBC averts disaster during opening ceremony

WILLIAM HOUSTON

whouston@globeandmail.com

August 9, 2008

The CBC narrowly escaped a technical calamity during its telecast of the Beijing Olympics' opening ceremony on Friday.

Just as the network switched from its preview show to the live telecast of the ceremony, the audio portion of the transmission disappeared.

The problem, which originated with the host broadcast, affected the CBC and about 15 international networks.

"Fortunately, we had our own lines installed," said Trevor Pilling, the CBC's Olympics executive producer. "So we went to our backup lines. Without having those backup lines in place, it could have been a disaster."

Pilling said a formal complaint has been lodged to the venue technical manager.

Scott Moore, the head of CBC Sports, said he received an e-mail message reporting that the Australian rights holder, Channel 7, was without audio for a period.

The CBC's audio problem lasted only a few seconds.

NBC's telecast, which was tape delayed to 7:30 p.m. EDT Friday night, was not affected by the technical problem.

Moore said the international broadcasters will meet Saturday.

The only other technical glitch that affected the CBC was difficulty in communicating with Canadians at the National Stadium's infield. Organizers refused to give CBC access to the athletes.

As an alternative, the network used a cellphone system linking co-hosts Peter Mansbridge and Ron MacLean to the athletes. It was largely ineffective, although a clear interview with flag-bearer Adam van Koeverden was achieved.

Grading opener

Nancy Wilson of CBC Newsworld called it stunning. Her colleague Heather Hiscox described it as "jaw-dropping."

Yes, the opening ceremony was a visual spectacle, particularly if you were watching it in high-definition television. And it was massive, with a participation involving thousands.

But it was also curiously rigid and unmoving.

Though technically amazing and impeccably executed, the historical theme was devoid of any significant amount of passion or charm.

It probably would have been impossible to live up to the hype, but the ceremony seemed flat and well short of a historic high.

The wow factor came at the end when retired gymnast Li Ning, suspended by a cable, circled the stadium before torching the cauldron. At the end of the first hour, a huge globe ascended from the depths of the National Stadium as performers, held by cables, circled it.

"Don't try this at home," advised MacLean, who brought some much needed levity to the telecast.

There was scant reason to criticize the CBC's coverage, but one might have been the seriousness of the tone. Peter Mansbridge is a respected news anchor, but he will never do stand-up.

Still, he gave the telecast the authority and gravitas it needed, given that the Games are in China. Over the next two weeks, we'll get plenty of the other rah-rah stuff.

Mansbridge made note of the incongruity of Russian athletes standing next to Georgians in the stadium, with Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin looking down, while at the same time Russia was attacking Georgia.

"There used to be a thing about the Olympics," he said. "Truces were signed during the Olympics - no fighting by member nations. Well, we've got a problem."

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What I hate is that they show a women's Beach Volleyball game (Mexico v.s. Brazil) while Canadians are competing in other sports...

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What I hate is that they show a women's Beach Volleyball game (Mexico v.s. Brazil) while Canadians are competing in other sports...

Exactly. I noticed that too. They need to broadcast the sports wherre Canadians are competing.

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CBC's broadcast isn't all that bad at this point. I think they are stuck between a lame duck and going out with a bang since CTV-Rogers have the TV rights for 2010 and 2012.

It is kind of a different coverage as Brian Williams is no longer there to anchor (since he has moved to CTV/TSN), but Ron MacLean should have been give the Prime Time Anchor Host role years ago. The coverage of Track and Field won't be the same as Don Wittman died of Cancer in January. Mark Lee is a capable commentator but he is not in the same league as Don Wittman.

The coverage online at cbc.ca has been suprisingly very good. Plus Lori Strong Ballard isn't hard to look at :-)

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TV's first day at the Olympics

William Houston, August 9, 2008 at 3:57 PM EDT

Globe & Mail

Which network provided the best coverage of Friday's opening ceremony? NBC, by a significant margin.

The CBC was hampered by host broadcast technical problems. NBC did not appear to face the same challenges.

Still, co-hosts Bob Costas and Matt Lauer brought more information, enthusiasm and energy to the NBC telecast than Ron MacLean and Peter Mansbridge did for the CBC. Mansbridge handled most of the play by play of the opening one-hour-long historical spectacle, and that was a mistake. His low key approach was commendable in the sense he did not talk our heads off. But he didn't fall over himself to engage the viewer, either. And his somewhat wooden persona made the presentation even less interesting.

-- The CBC's soccer play by play team of Nigel Reed and Jason De Vos has been excellent, particularly when you consider they are calling the games off a monitor in Toronto. All they can see is what we see on the TV screen. This morning, Reed gave us a report on the weather before the start of the Canada-China game. “It's hot and humid here,” he said. No it wasn't. It was cool and rainy in Toronto. Oh, no, he was trying to make us believe he was in China. A mistake. It was misleading. This isn't make-believe. This is supposed to be sports broadcast journalism. Tell us the truth.

-- Still on that subject, kudos of NBC for posting a graphic periodically during its opening ceremony coverage that read: Previously taped. Given the 12 hour difference from Beijing and Eastern Time in North America, NBC and CBC should post a graphic reading “live” or “taped” during all the coverage, just so we know.

-- The CBC's Olympic studio at the Ling Long Pagoda tower is the most spectacular we've seen at a Summer Games. The view takes in National Stadium. And the tower itself is a compelling piece of architecture.

-- This is Diana Swain's first Olympics and it was a smart move to assign her as morning co-host. Swain, a Toronto based CBC News anchor, has been effective -- engaging, confident, informed and objective.

-- King Kaufman, a sports columnist with Salon.com, rapped NBC for tape delaying the start of the opening ceremony by 12 hours. “Outrageous,” he wrote. “This is 2008 . . . NBC is living in the 20th century with its ‘watch the big network' approach.”

-- CBC gymnastics analyst Lori Strong-Ballard will never be accused of negativity. She's consistently enthusiastic and praiseworthy of the Canadians. But a little context would help. To listen to Strong-Ballard gush over Kyle Shewfelt's performance in the floor routine, you would have thought the Canadian gold medal winner at Athens was a cinch to advance to the final. He didn't make it. In addition to cheerleading, she needed to tell us straight how he performed in relation to the other competitors.

-- Former Olympian Clara Hughes, a CBC analyst for cycling, provided plenty of good information during the men's road race this morning.

Cory Roan from Vancouver, Canada writes: As an armchair Olympic spectator I arose early Friday morning (4am) to watch the Live unfolding of the Opening Ceremonies in Beijing. As a dutiful Canadian I tuned into the CBC coverage and witnessed a degree of reporting so lackluster it bordered on the morose. I mean get real! Who has ever seen such a spectacular opening to the Olypmics as the Chinese have put on to open these Games? Is such a muted reaction from our representative brothers the natural outcry of appreciation the rest of our country was feeling? I have long suspected that Canada is a nation of smallness... this is just another proof of that thesis. Oh well, an easy flip of the channel revealed a more fitting reaction from our American cousins.

Our United States brethren charged with the task of reporting the Ceremonies performed fittingly the task with "information, enthusiasm and energy" -- so truthfully stated in the above article by William Houston. To the NBC: bravo.

To the CBC: huh? I would like to know why Peter Mansbridge was allowed to cover the Opening Ceremonies. Don't the producers know his wooden personality and dull tone would come off as sort of, well, dull? A far better pick would have been Ian Hanamansing. The latter provides crisp, clear reporting with a tone that emanates a lively respect for his subject and a warm objectivity that only he seems to deliver (there are many great CBC sports-casters, but only one great CBC sports-anchor).

I can only hope the CBC doesn't make the same mistake twice. If Ian is not picked to cover the Closing Ceremonies, I will simply flip over to our friends to the south and get that "information, enthusiasm and energy" that fits in with this 29th Olympiad.

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^^^

Ian Hanomansing is one of the best in the business, imo. I expect he would speak to you exactly the same whether sitting across from you or on television. Very personable.

CBC's coverage so far has been meh... I think they've been on the decline since Athens. I'm finding there's a myriad of technical glitches... nothing major, but it's sure lacking in polish. Their intro music/graphics have also gotten progressively crappier. Their Salt Lake coverage was great, but this seems like a bit of an exercise in futility.

From what I've heard about CTV's plans for 2010, I'd expect it to be more akin to NBC's coverage... they're throwing a crapload of money at it. The difference is, it won't be tape delayed of course :P

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^ lol, well NBC's coverage of 2010 will be almost the same as what they did for Salt Lake, being in the same North American time zone. For the first time in 8 years, our friends south of the border will be watching the ceremonies in their entirety and most importantly, LIVE! :D

Gotta agree with what you said about CBC, they've been "whatever" on their Olympic coverage eversince losing the tv rights to CTV/Rogers, and that happened right before Torino. I absolutely hate their opening ident for 2008, it lacks the excitement and passion of the Beijing and Torino idents.

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^^^

And FYI X, my praise of CTV's plans isn't due to any connection with them (I'm no longer there), but I do have an acquaintance who has moved to Toronto to work as part of the consortium team, and some of the things he's told me in regards to their plans/who they've hired on makes me feel quite confident they'll provide excellent coverage.

I think CTV should buy CBC's Olympic theme as well, as I think it's become quite iconic. Just to add insult to injury.

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Just imagine if Peter Mansbridge were replaced with Don Cherry for the opening ceremonies! :blink::lol::rolleyes:

He'll be replaced by Lloyd Robertson in 2010. :D

And FYI X, my praise of CTV's plans isn't due to any connection with them (I'm no longer there), but I do have an acquaintance who has moved to Toronto to work as part of the consortium team, and some of the things he's told me in regards to their plans/who they've hired on makes me feel quite confident they'll provide excellent coverage.

I think CTV should buy CBC's Olympic theme as well, as I think it's become quite iconic. Just to add insult to injury.

ugh...well hopefully, CTV will have a better opening ident. The one CBC made looks incredibly cheap and the music is terrible and boring, it lacks the energy and excitement that the Torino and Athens idents had. Not to mention the gold girl with 8 arms looks more Malaysian than Chinese....

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He'll be replaced by Lloyd Robertson in 2010. :D

ugh...well hopefully, CTV will have a better opening ident. The one CBC made looks incredibly cheap and the music is terrible and boring, it lacks the energy and excitement that the Torino and Athens idents had. Not to mention the gold girl with 8 arms looks more Malaysian than Chinese....

A good portion of Malaysians are Chinese.

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The best way to keep track of Canadians, I have found, is to watch both CBC NW, and TSN. In the mornings, TSN seems to have teams and group activities, while the main network seems to be featuring Ron McLean (whom I cannot stand) who is doing a review of events overnight, in bits and pieces. The women's soccer game againist China, for example, was on TSN, as it will be Tuesday.

Occasionally I swing over to NBC to see what they are doing. Since Americans seem to be in everything, there is better variety of sposrts on NBC than on CBC/TSN.

Also, you'll see more heats in swimming as there are more American swimmers, and countries that have only 1 athleete tend to be put into heat 9 or 10 (or more!!)

I saw the boxer about 4 times in the last 24 hours, and everytime he lost 20-1!!!! Just shows how often they give us the results.

For interesting reading on media, try Chris Zelkovich in the Toronto Star. www.thestar.com

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^^^

And FYI X, my praise of CTV's plans isn't due to any connection with them (I'm no longer there), but I do have an acquaintance who has moved to Toronto to work as part of the consortium team, and some of the things he's told me in regards to their plans/who they've hired on makes me feel quite confident they'll provide excellent coverage.

I think CTV should buy CBC's Olympic theme as well, as I think it's become quite iconic. Just to add insult to injury.

I wonder if CTV/Rogers will lure some CBC talent (behind the camera and on camera) to their coverage of 2010 and 2012 Olympics. NBC borrows a couple of freelance announcers and some from ESPN. For instance NBC has hired ESPN lead Basketball announcer Mike Breen to be its play by play guy for their basketball coverage.

I wonder if CTV will borrow the likes of Steve Armatige and Scott Russell to their coverage.

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The best way to keep track of Canadians, I have found, is to watch both CBC NW, and TSN. In the mornings, TSN seems to have teams and group activities, while the main network seems to be featuring Ron McLean (whom I cannot stand) who is doing a review of events overnight, in bits and pieces. The women's soccer game againist China, for example, was on TSN, as it will be Tuesday.

Occasionally I swing over to NBC to see what they are doing. Since Americans seem to be in everything, there is better variety of sposrts on NBC than on CBC/TSN.

Also, you'll see more heats in swimming as there are more American swimmers, and countries that have only 1 athleete tend to be put into heat 9 or 10 (or more!!)

I saw the boxer about 4 times in the last 24 hours, and everytime he lost 20-1!!!! Just shows how often they give us the results.

For interesting reading on media, try Chris Zelkovich in the Toronto Star. www.thestar.com

Diana a very good article in the Globe and Mail about NBC and the Olympics Confirms what I say to some very stubborn people here who live in denial about the Olympics and just what is influencing awarding the Games.

THe 894 Million dollar gorilla in the room calls the shots and the Beijing Games have the Highest opening ceremonies ratings outside a US based Olympics. LA 84 had the largest US Ratings followed by Atlanta 1996 and now Beijing has the third highest rating for the Opening ceremonies . Sydney 2000 held in September was a Ratings disaster and NBC told the IOC that they would not be flipping over 500 million to the body without Ratings Results. This is why with the internet you are also going to see the games come to the Americas more often then the 2000's has had. Timezones more then ever will play a huge role with internet video portals. This helps London 2012 , a Rio bid , a future african bid. THe unique flavor for Beijing for a cultural education standpoint probably helped the Ratings hugely for the Opening but it also Helps places like a Rio or Africa where Americans has a natural curiosity for these mysterious places. There is nothing very new or exotic about modern Europe and naturally the education and exposure of those cultures is very high for the Prime TV Audience paying the IOC's Meals Mainly main street America.

Also key in Mind NBC is owned by General Electric a Major worldwide Partner of the IOC and bad ratings do not please their shareholders.

Here's the article

Why hold Games in unpredictable August? Ask NBC

* Article

* Comments (Comment5)

*

LES PERREAUX

From Monday's Globe and Mail

August 11, 2008 at 4:32 AM EDT

When Beijing's August Olympics aren't a smoggy sauna, they seem to be pounded by pouring rain and bolts of lightning.

Any guidebook informs the well-prepared traveller that the best time to be in Beijing is September or October. The second-best time is spring, despite strong winds and dust.

So whose idea was it to hold the world's elite athletic event in the middle of the Chinese capital's notoriously unpleasant summer?

While a Chinese superstition holds 08/08/08 is among the luckiest dates this century, don't blame China. The real answer lies in the power of the American television networks.

After the Sydney Olympics in September of 2000 proved a U.S. ratings bust, the networks informed the International Olympic Committee they wouldn't tolerate a billion-dollar price tag for another late Summer Games.

"Even before Beijing was chosen, it was made very clear to the cities that were bidding for the Games that these Games would have to be held in August, in the traditional time period," Neal Pilson, former president of CBS Sports, said in an interview.

"It wasn't a surprise for Beijing. The IOC has agreed that Summer Olympics will probably continue to be held in the traditional summer period."

The 15-hour time difference with key eastern U.S. markets was often blamed for Sydney's ratings, but NBC Universal Sports & Olympics Chairman Dick Ebersol held a different view when Beijing won its bid in 2001.

Mr. Ebersol, whose network paid $894-million (U.S.) for the rights to the Beijing Games, said ratings were down in Sydney because children were back in school and adults were back to work.

While it's true viewers have less time to dedicate to beach volleyball and rowing when summer is over, Mr. Pilson said that's only part of the equation.

Olympics in the fall also conflict with the National Football League and Major League Baseball pennant drives and playoffs.

"It's not just eyeballs, it's scheduling," said Mr. Pilson, who started his own television marketing firm after he left CBS in 1994.

"NBC would lose a very valuable Sunday night if they were carrying the Olympics and the NFL at the same time. It's the same with the other networks on Sunday afternoons. None of the networks would ditch their NFL commitment for the Olympics."

Early results from the opening ceremonies indicate the theory of the advantageous August may be correct. The 12-hour tape delay of the opening ceremonies drew higher ratings than any other for a non-U.S. Olympics, with 34.2 million American viewers.

The August Olympics also allow the network to heavily promote other TV programs just in advance of their big fall launch, according to Susan Tyler Eastman, co-author of Media Programming: Strategies and Practices.

"The timing really works for them in a multitude of ways," said Dr. Eastman, a professor at Indiana University.

Olympic officials are hoping rain in the forecast might clear the Beijing air. The thick grey-brown blanket has made more headlines than athletic achievement.

"I think the blue skies will come, especially after today's rain," said Wang Wei, executive vice-president of the Beijing organizing committee. "I have my fingers crossed."

But Mr. Pilson said even a deluge or more smog won't diminish viewer enthusiasm for the Olympics. The worse the conditions, the more people tend to tune in, he said.

Whether it's a bone-chilling late-season football game or last winter's snowy outdoor National Hockey League game in Buffalo, Mr. Pilson said bad weather actually increases sports ratings by heightening the curiosity factor.

Pollution is just one more variable.

"All of that together does create a higher level of interest, which translates into more eyeballs watching the Games. It all actually improves the viewer experience."

With a report from The Associated Press

my Favorite quote

b]"NBC would lose a very valuable Sunday night if they were carrying the Olympics and the NFL at the same time. It's the same with the other networks on Sunday afternoons. None of the networks would ditch their NFL commitment for the Olympics."[/b]

NBC has the IOC over a Barrel as the competitors like Fox and CBS can easily put a huge dent with NFL football and Major league baseball in September. The Same does not happen in July or August. There is only so many TV networks that will provide a Billion to a Summer Olympics and NFL Football or Major League Baseball is equally as expensive to the competing networks in America.

When NBC says to the IOC Tell London to put those high tension wires underground the IOC asks How deep would you like them Master ROTFLMAO

Jim Jones

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I have compared the two: CBC and NBC. Yep, the CBC is now pretty much a lame duck here and, seriously, the closing ceremony would be cut here and there for sure. NBC did a good job in trying to cover the entire parade as best as it can. Again, the CBC did exactly like Atlanta, Sydney and Athens: feels that it needs to cut sections of the parade for "breaks and broken-down interviews with Canadian athletes." In other words, it has gone downhill.

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This is my second time following a games in Canada and I have to say CBC is comparable to NBC in that it strives to broadcast live or at least as timely as possible.

I actually think they talk about Canadian athletes too much. I really don't need 5 minutes to be told that somebody from Canada came nearly in last in a particular event! The one thing NBC has are those well edited and researched minireports on different athletes. Many of them on athletes who aren't expected to do well and who aren't American. For example, yesterday's coverage that I watched included a background story on the 33 year old former Soviet gymnast competing for Germany and her struggles etc. Those are just nice humanizing touches and in my eyes CBC is always reporting in an accusatory fashion. Every single thing I have watched has been about a Canadian and heaven forbid somebody perform not as well as predicted. "Why did you lose? Do you suck? Do you hate Canada?! DO YOU HATE YOUR COUNTRY??!! WELL. DO YA?!?!" lol. I'm exaggerating, but it just feels like it.

NBC, despite the agonizing tape delays for major events, really emphasizes celebrating all of the athletes and not just the Americans, and an unfortunate side effect of that means giving many American athletes no coverage at all. I remember NBC going apeshit over Alexandre Despatie and Perdita Felicien in Athens!

CBC's web feeds are very reliable and timely also. No glitches yet! And I've been using them a LOT. An upside to NBC's web feed is that they show more events, but because I'm here I can't circumvent the block. :)

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I wonder if CTV/Rogers will lure some CBC talent (behind the camera and on camera) to their coverage of 2010 and 2012 Olympics. NBC borrows a couple of freelance announcers and some from ESPN. For instance NBC has hired ESPN lead Basketball announcer Mike Breen to be its play by play guy for their basketball coverage.

I wonder if CTV will borrow the likes of Steve Armatige and Scott Russell to their coverage.

The one they need to borrow is Jim Hughson, though doubt his contract would allow it.

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I watched the CBC down here in my (not bragging) summer residence in georgeous Barbados and I found the commentary for the opening good. The commercial breaks were awful though and the angles of the shots could have done some more work.

I find the CBC way more balnaced in covering athletes from around the world than NBC. I was actually pretty amazed that CBC is so popular in the Caribbean.

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