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Look Of The Games


Sir Rols
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Judging by the Opening Ceremony it appears they're trying to avoid anything that alludes to communism.

It wa also a fear of mine that these games would have an overwhelming "Red" China look, so once again I'm pleasantly surprised. Dare I say that China just may well be on the verge of pulling off the newest "Best Games Ever".

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Judging by the Opening Ceremony it appears they're trying to avoid anything that alludes to communism.

Then, they should also have avoided such Communist gestures like the one the flag children did when the Chinese anthem was played.

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It wa also a fear of mine that these games would have an overwhelming "Red" China look, so once again I'm pleasantly surprised. Dare I say that China just may well be on the verge of pulling off the newest "Best Games Ever".

Only for those not here in Beijing...here I just get the feeling everything is fake. The energy isn't just natural; it feels forced. r maybe I'm crazy? :blink:

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Only for those not here in Beijing...here I just get the feeling everything is fake. The energy isn't just natural; it feels forced. r maybe I'm crazy? :blink:

Perhaps the size of the city, and it's impersonal nature are not conducive to that warm Olympic feeling? What have you seen?

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Hmm, I noticed that they've changed a few things at some venues over night.

For example, they changed a border fence at one of the Volleyball venues to the red, yellow, white gradient combination. It was all very blue and cohesive on Saturday...

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Hmm, I noticed that they've changed a few things at some venues over night.

For example, they changed a border fence at one of the Volleyball venues to the red, yellow, white gradient combination. It was all very blue and cohesive on Saturday...

This interview with an IOC and OCOG "Look of the Games" consultant explains it - http://ringsinbeijing.iconologic.com/?p=93

So Day 1 is a test run, Look-wise.

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This interview with an IOC and OCOG "Look of the Games" consultant explains it - http://ringsinbeijing.iconologic.com/?p=93

So Day 1 is a test run, Look-wise.

Thanks for the link.

That Brenda Wood is such a mediocre reporter, she made me cringe.

Brad Copeland just got lucky in his new Olympic assignments. He was really a MINOR partner in the design contracts awarded for Atlanta 1996. The major 1996 logo work was done by Landor Associates of San Francisco. They just needed a local partner to bolster their credibility with ACOG, so they brought in this small-time Atlanta-based graphic designer, Brad Copeland, to partner with -- and since then, he has been riding the wave of Olympic assignments.

This doofus was also on the panel that selected the accursed Ilanaag!!

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Hmm, I noticed that they've changed a few things at some venues over night.

For example, they changed a border fence at one of the Volleyball venues to the red, yellow, white gradient combination. It was all very blue and cohesive on Saturday...

Thanks, that's cool link with a lot of good pictures!

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Then, they should also have avoided such Communist gestures like the one the flag children did when the Chinese anthem was played.

Erm...communist the country may be, but you do not expect any other nationality to change their normal gestures when their anthem is sung just because it was on display on international TV?

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Erm...communist the country may be, but you do not expect any other nationality to change their normal gestures when their anthem is sung just because it was on display on international TV?

First, those gestures (you probably mean especially the "hand on the heart" of the Americans and some other nationalities) don't necessarily represent a political ideology, but only patriotism. I've never seen people from non-Communist countries doing such a "hand above the head" gesture while honouring their flag. Instead, it reminded me very strongly of the salute the FDJ (the Socialist youth organisation in the GDR) used.

Secondly, was that gesture really necessary? The children were actually the only ones in the stadium which showed it while the anthem was played, and I've got the impression that it's very common in China not to make any special gestures during the anthem.

Thirdly: My comment was actually only a reply to Stu's statement that "they're trying to avoid anything that alludes to communism". And that was clearly not the case in terms of that gesture of the children, which was (as I said) a typically Communist gesture.

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First, those gestures (you probably mean especially the "hand on the heart" of the Americans and some other nationalities) don't necessarily represent a political ideology, but only patriotism. I've never seen people from non-Communist countries doing such a "hand above the head" gesture while honouring their flag. Instead, it reminded me very strongly of the salute the FDJ (the Socialist youth organisation in the GDR) used.

Secondly, was that gesture really necessary? The children were actually the only ones in the stadium which showed it while the anthem was played, and I've got the impression that it's very common in China not to make any special gestures during the anthem.

Thirdly: My comment was actually only a reply to Stu's statement that "they're trying to avoid anything that alludes to communism". And that was clearly not the case in terms of that gesture of the children, which was (as I said) a typically Communist gesture.

Firstly, I am fully aware that you are uncomfortable over those gestures only because they were communist to you, when you have no problems with any other gesture. Thus what irks me, is your attempt to question the "necessity" of a hand gesture just because it makes you uncomfortable. From what high moral position do you have to question practices in another state or culture?

Secondly, just as there may be currently no non-Communist country where people would have a similar hand gesture as depicted on screen, I do not see a direct correlation between that gesture and all Communist states. Do the Vietnamese, Laotians and Cubans show the same gesture? Communism in itself is an ideology which doesn't dictate a common hand gesture. Any hand gesture is a social construct of the state in question, and just because one communist state copies another doesn't make it the gesture itself a "Communist" one.

Thirdly, That only the children are doing it is nothing unusual, since they are on "show", so to speak, and representative of the people in question. I suppose we will deem all saluting military personal as an unnecessary display too since ordinary civilians aren't expected to do the same thing?

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Other than the 'goose-stepping' which seemed to be quite deliberate, I didn't see any other overt 'hand gestures' that carried a political overtone. Did the kids do a 'Sino Power" hand=pump that I didn't see? :blink:

My 2 lady guests were a little touchy about the 'goose-stepping' during the flag-raising (WHICH I guess was the price the military exacted for contributing some 8,000+ of its conscripted members to fulfill Zhang Yimou's fantasies) and I told them in some softer tones that China after all, is still a communist state. (Yeah, why does China still keep that odd remnant of the European totaliarian regimes?)

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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To some, hands on the heart are equally uncomfortable. Doing it at the right time is fine, but last night, we have this 4*100 americans (Phelps included) on the podium, and they (and all 4 of them) put their hands on like 20-30 seconds before the anthem played and while they were still chatting among each other... it looked really robotic.

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