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How Do You Think Of The Opening Ceremony?


lamptern
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It is an oustanding and fantastic one I think. It showed that China is going to the world while Chinese people welcome the world.

They invented gun powder for fireworks but not fire arms.

They invented compass for sailing but not invasion.

They built the Great Wall for defence but not offence.

No body should afraid of a stronger China as its history tells us well.

I am pround of bring a Chinese-Canadian!

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I think it was a stunning show - it worked like a well adjusted clockwork - I was impressed by the colours, by the harmony of movements of the people and finally by some great ideas (e.g. the picture which was made during the OC and finished by the footprints of the athletes, the pics on the umbrellas from all over the world)

China presented itself as part of the world and as a great nation - I just want to add that I was surprise that Mao-tse-tung was part of the OC...

Edited by Citius Altius Fortius
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Overall I enjoyed the opening ceremony! Some parts were just fantastic and some dragged on a little! I do think I preferred the opening ceremony in Athens better than this. As for the cauldron lighting I thought it was unique and novel! But I also preferred the Archer in Barcelona to this!

But great work any way and the New Zealand team looked stunning!

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Overall I enjoyed the opening ceremony! Some parts were just fantastic and some dragged on a little! I do think I preferred the opening ceremony in Athens better than this. As for the cauldron lighting I thought it was unique and novel! But I also preferred the Archer in Barcelona to this!

Yeah, nothing still tops the 1992 arrow shot! Still...What will they do in London?

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China presented itself as part of the world and as a great nation - I just want to add that I was surprise that Mao-tse-tung was part of the OC...

:blink: Mao Tse Tung?? Mao has already become a past tense in China. I guess even the government leaders don't believe in the Mao's idoelogy now. In fact the current version of "political education" in China has already thrown out those "class stuggle", "rule by workers and farmers" blar blar blar. The current party policy is to inculde as much as possible people (inculding capitalism big bosses), earning money and improving living standard. So Mao has already gone, he just remains in local political jokes and tourist souvenirs.

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Quasi repost from another thread...

I was pretty underwhelmed. This might be my Westernized mentality kicking in, but there just didn't seem to be any real... flow.

What's there is portrayed very beautifully, but the ceremony was made up of segments of people doing stuff.

There's no story or real progression to any of it. I understand that it's difficult to cram that much history into one hour, but with Sydney and Salt Lake, you at least had a kid serving as your guide who discovered the different aspects of Australian/Utah history along with you as a member of the audience. Were it not for the broadcaster's commentary, I'm not sure I'd be aware of what each segment of the ceremony was meant to communicate to its audience. Maybe that's ignorance on my part, but I also felt a bit distant from what was going on... I wasn't swept away and felt like a participant, I was merely an observer.

Some parts of it felt a little too orchestrated for my tastes, notably the National Anthem (with the kids all singing with perfect smiles and right arms raised... made me squirm) and the performers 'taking a bow' after each segment. It took me out of the moment when the drummers dropped their stoic, warrior-like appearances and began smiling and waving. It seemed suddenly out of character.

The cauldron and its incorporation into the roof I love, but the lighting wasn't anything spectacular. Had some echoes of the international torch relay portion of Athens' ceremony.

On the upside, those of us in Vancouver won't need to worry about that echo in BC Place, because it sounds like the National Stadium is far, far worse. Sarah Brightman sounded like she was underwater... funny that they should be showing whales around the rim of the roof at that point.

Just my two yuen.

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OK, what do I think of these Opening Ceremonies?

NOT lavish enough. :( Too plain. They really needed to jazz it up more.

And the floor looked empty. They should've thrown in a couple more thousand performers!!

They better do better in CLosing!! :angry:

I tend to agree. It didn't look like a $100 million production to me. Then again, I don't quite know what a show costing that much would look like. It just didn't seem as sweeping or elaborate as one would've expected for that price tag.

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Quasi repost from another thread...

I was pretty underwhelmed. This might be my Westernized mentality kicking in, but there just didn't seem to be any real... flow.

What's there is portrayed very beautifully, but the ceremony was made up of segments of people doing stuff.

There's no story or real progression to any of it. I understand that it's difficult to cram that much history into one hour, but with Sydney and Salt Lake, you at least had a kid serving as your guide who discovered the different aspects of Australian/Utah history along with you as a member of the audience. Were it not for the broadcaster's commentary, I'm not sure I'd be aware of what each segment of the ceremony was meant to communicate to its audience. Maybe that's ignorance on my part, but I also felt a bit distant from what was going on... I wasn't swept away and felt like a participant, I was merely an observer.

Some parts of it felt a little too orchestrated for my tastes, notably the National Anthem (with the kids all singing with perfect smiles and right arms raised... made me squirm) and the performers 'taking a bow' after each segment. It took me out of the moment when the drummers dropped their stoic, warrior-like appearances and began smiling and waving. It seemed suddenly out of character.

The cauldron and its incorporation into the roof I love, but the lighting wasn't anything spectacular. Had some echoes of the international torch relay portion of Athens' ceremony.

On the upside, those of us in Vancouver won't need to worry about that echo in BC Place, because it sounds like the National Stadium is far, far worse. Sarah Brightman sounded like she was underwater... funny that they should be showing whales around the rim of the roof at that point.

Just my two yuen.

Watching NBC's coverage of the ceremony helps. The commentators do a much better job at commentating than the two at CBC, and they kept the flow of the ceremonies.....the commercials were at the right places.

I'd say BC Place is worse when it comes to echo, National Stadium wasn't that bad.

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I tend to agree. It didn't look like a $100 million production to me. Then again, I don't quite know what a show costing that much would look like. It just didn't seem as sweeping or elaborate as one would've expected for that price tag.

It's actually $100-million for BOTH the Opening and Closing Ceremonies, not just the opening.

Beijing would be foolish to spend $100-million on the opening solely.

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I agree watching NBC is better and not as choppy. Having cultural aspects that aren't obvious to the average viewer pointed out is very cool, although at times a little much. I watched parts of Athens on both Canadian and American stations (wasn't in Vancouver during Torino) and it was obvious NBC was a bit more in depth and had research. Seeing CBC made me more greatly appreciate the coverage of my original country :P CBC and NBC should definitely team together in their coverage work. Both are bound by national connections to talk quite a bit about the other country during the OG. I was really surprised how interested NBC was in the Canadians in Athens, even some who weren't clear medal favs.

Other than that, there are just a lot of cultural things many people here just simply don't understand or appreciate. These ceremonies were very bold and impressionistic. The aesthetics were amazing and everything seemed to rich and fluid.

BEST ONES EVER, imo!!! So well orchestrated, and as Bob Costas annoyingly pointed out SEVERAL times "cinematic".

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Quasi repost from another thread...

I was pretty underwhelmed. This might be my Westernized mentality kicking in, but there just didn't seem to be any real... flow.

What's there is portrayed very beautifully, but the ceremony was made up of segments of people doing stuff.

There's no story or real progression to any of it. I understand that it's difficult to cram that much history into one hour, but with Sydney and Salt Lake, you at least had a kid serving as your guide who discovered the different aspects of Australian/Utah history along with you as a member of the audience. Were it not for the broadcaster's commentary, I'm not sure I'd be aware of what each segment of the ceremony was meant to communicate to its audience. Maybe that's ignorance on my part, but I also felt a bit distant from what was going on... I wasn't swept away and felt like a participant, I was merely an observer.

Some parts of it felt a little too orchestrated for my tastes, notably the National Anthem (with the kids all singing with perfect smiles and right arms raised... made me squirm) and the performers 'taking a bow' after each segment. It took me out of the moment when the drummers dropped their stoic, warrior-like appearances and began smiling and waving. It seemed suddenly out of character.

The cauldron and its incorporation into the roof I love, but the lighting wasn't anything spectacular. Had some echoes of the international torch relay portion of Athens' ceremony.

On the upside, those of us in Vancouver won't need to worry about that echo in BC Place, because it sounds like the National Stadium is far, far worse. Sarah Brightman sounded like she was underwater... funny that they should be showing whales around the rim of the roof at that point.

Just my two yuen.

I totally agree with you. They are missing the 'story-telling factor' in this ceremony. Sydney and Athens is telling us a story with the ceremony, albeit a very historical one. But at least we can relate to it and there is a progression. In Beijing, it's too selective and suddenly you move from very traditional to a spaceman and a walking globe and the whole show finished with no climax. Bit dumbfounded.

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Some parts of it felt a little too orchestrated for my tastes, notably the National Anthem (with the kids all singing with perfect smiles and right arms raised... made me squirm) and the performers 'taking a bow' after each segment. It took me out of the moment when the drummers dropped their stoic, warrior-like appearances and began smiling and waving. It seemed suddenly out of character.

I totally agree with you! I laughed out loud when those guys in the box popped out and waved and smiled to the crowd. It was kinda cheesy, to suddenly jumped out of their character as you said, from warrior to attention-loving teenagers.

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I totally agree with you! I laughed out loud when those guys in the box popped out and waved and smiled to the crowd. It was kinda cheesy, to suddenly jumped out of their character as you said, from warrior to attention-loving teenagers.

Actually, the 2 women who watched it here with me tonight ACTUALLY liked the humanistic touch such as the above. Initially they found it too draconian and military-like, especially the Opening drums. But when one drummer smiled beautifully for the camera, and then the same young men popped their heads out of those oblong boxes, my 2 lady friends warmed up and said EXACTLY what the producers added at the last minute: the humanistic touch -- that all that precison work was NOT something machine-like or subhuman. In the end, it was regular human beings who were behind the magic of the show.

In all my 40 years of watching Olympic Games (since Mexico 1968), these are the MOST MAGNIFICENT and MAJESTIC Ceremonies. I would say it's a good merger of Barcelona and Salt Lake -- previously the best for each of the Olympic Games. The flow, the precision, the visions and the themes were just beyond comparison. It was magnificent and lavish and massive, but at the same time done with a lot of restraint and elegance -- and still engaging and entertaining. Nothing garish.

The kids? They were fine. They're part of every Olympic ceremony.

The lighting was fine. OK, maybe a little too contrived, but I don't see how they could've done any less. And the idea of the scroll being unfurled as Li Ning tried to run, that idea for me overcame the stodginess of the segment. (Now it makes sense why the cauldron was so bulky and odd-shaped.)

Mr. Yimou, you done your country proud!! AAA+ from me (and I am very hard to please as some of you know.) I'm just sorry I couldn't make it this time.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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The scrolls told the story. You didn't need another little boy or little girl to guide you thru the story.

This time, the little boy (the little survivor) was guided thru the evening's journey.

Yeah, I just don't get how people thought it was disjointed and just a series of isolated spectacles. For me the scroll and story telling theme was one of the strongest linking elements of any ceremony to date, and even carried on from the design of the torch right through to the cauldron. I thought the narrative worked extremely well.

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The Opening Ceremony of Beijing 2008, would have to be one of the most memorable ever for me. I loved the start with the drums, the scroll, the Dynasty Ladies (weren't they just so pretty!!!!).... the moving type feature was also a great moment.

My family and I especially love the picture that was painted by the athletes.... very creative and I wonder where they are going to display it??

Was it just me, or did anyone not see the part with the Terracotta Warriors? :( I was lookin for them in the performance, but it appears to me that they had a costume change of some sort... i think that this was during the puppet Opera sequence....

anyways, I won't compare this Ceremony to the others in the past, namely Sydney and Athens, coz they are all different... with very special moments in each........

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