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Terrorist Attack In China Kills Sixteen Police Officers


mr.x
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Looks like China's terror worries were real afterall......hope nothing goes wrong during the Games itself.

Grenade attack kills 16 policemen on Chinese border

Tania Branigan in Beijing

guardian.co.uk,

Monday August 4 2008

Attackers have killed 16 policemen and injured 16 more in a suspected terrorist raid in north-west China's restive region of Xinjiang this morning, the state media have reported.

Two assailants used a dump truck to target a paramilitary police border post near Kashgar, running down and then knifing a team of policemen on their morning drills before exploding grenades, the state news agency Xinhua said.

The area is already under tight security in the run-up to the Olympics, which begin in just four days. The authorities have repeatedly accused Uighur Muslim separatists seeking an independent "East Turkestan" of plotting violent attacks and recently claimed to have arrested 82 people in Xinjiang this year in connection with terrorism.

Human rights campaigners and Uighur exiles argue that the government has exaggerated the threat of violence, and deliberately blurred the distinction between extremism, pro-independence arguments and cultural expression to justify repression in the region.

Xinhua reported that the attackers struck as paramilitary police were on their morning drills just outside their station. As the lorry veered off the road, the attackers jumped out, throwing two grenades into the barracks and hacking at the policemen with knives. Fourteen officers were killed on the spot and two more died on the way to hospital. The raiders were arrested.

State television gave a different account, saying the police were attacked while marching in front of a hotel on morning drills.

Xinhua claimed today that Xinjiang's public security bureau had found evidence suggesting that the East Turkestan Islamic Movement (Etim) were planning attacks in the run up to the Opening Ceremony on Friday.

A 100,000-strong security force is on standby in Beijing - around 2,500 miles away from Kashgar - and Reuters news agency reported an unusually heavy police presence around Tiananmen Square, the political heart of Beijing.

But terrorism experts had suggested that the security crackdown in the capital and other Olympic host cities meant attacks were more likely in other areas.

Kashgar, known to the Chinese as Kashi, is an old Silk Road city and was traditionally regarded as the Uighur capital of the region.

Turkic-speaking Uighur Muslims form around 8 million of Xinjiang's 19 million population. Many resent controls on religion and growing Han Chinese immigration.

Occasional violence in the 1990s brought a clamp down from Beijing, which stationed paramilitary units in the area and targeted unregistered mosques and religious schools which officials claimed were inciting militant action.

Etim was deemed a terrorist organisation by both the United Nations and the United States. But while it has a history of working with foreign groups, some analysts believe that its links to al-Qaida were overstated and are now defunct. They have also suggested that the organisation has dwindled.

Last week, the Chinese officer in charge of Olympics security said that "East Turkestan terrorist groups" represented the greatest threat to the games.

But on the same day, Kuerxi Maihesuti, vice-governor of Xinjiang, said they were "not that capable of instigating massive sabotage activities".

He added: "There are only a very small number of sabotage activities in Xinjiang and many were nipped in the bud."

The government has also played down the recent emergence of a video in which a trio of men identifying themselves as the little-known Turkestan Islamic party (Tip), claiming responsibility for bus blasts in China and threatening more attacks during the Olympics. Officials said that explosions in Shanghai in May and Kunming last month had been deliberate but not terrorist-related.

Analysts Stratfor suggested Tip and Etim were one and the same, but other experts believe they are separate organisations.

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President Bush will be attending the Beijing 2008 Opening Ceremony in a few days and he's bringing a massive contingent of armed 1,000 secret service agents to protect him for the duration of his visit. That really says something, as an American President has never brought that much security with him on any foreign visit.

As for Beijing's security, 400,000 police have been deployed across Beijing and close to 300,000 CCTV cameras have been installed in the city. The air space around the Olympic Village is defended by a battery of surface-to-air missiles while unmanned drones of the kind that circle the air above Baghdad are set to patrol the skies.

Beijing's newly-extended airport has set up security checks for everyone entering the terminals. As an added measure, authorities have announced a freeze on all flights during the opening ceremony on the evening of August 8.

Vehicles on roads coming into the capital face excruciating queues at security checks and there is a long list of items including liquids and electronics that the post office will not let you mail.

With these recent terrorist attacks, Beijing will probably be sending in more troops to guard the games from the People's Liberation Army.

The city is already fortress as is. Like Athens, I think and hope the high level of security and the awareness of the security in place will act as a deterrent for terrorist attacks.

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President Bush will be attending the Beijing 2008 Opening Ceremony in a few days and he's bringing a massive contingent of armed 1,000 secret service agents to protect him for the duration of his visit. That really says something, as an American President has never brought that much security with him on any foreign visit.

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Where did you get that story, X? That sounds like another Maryjane story.

The Secret Service doesn't even have that many active agents on their payroll.

And where do you think the Chinese would put up a visiting contingent of over 1,000 people? A whole hotel for a few days -- and then it empties out when Bush leaves? :rolleyes:

That's really one of the most ridiculous stories I've heard so far.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Where did you get that story, X? That sounds like another Maryjane story.

The Secret Service doesn't even have that many active agents on their payroll.

And where do you think the Chinese would put up a visiting contingent of over 1,000 people? A whole hotel for a few days -- and then it empties out when Bush leaves? :rolleyes:

That's really one of the most ridiculous stories I've heard so far.

I need to listen up some Baro story~ <_<

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Is it true that MI4 asked from british athletes/officials not to bring with them personal computers, pda, and erase 'sensitive' informations from their mobile phones because the Chinese government will do everything they can to put their hands on them?

Also is it true that Chinese asked from the hotels to install softwares that will not allow to visit pages about Tiber etc?

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Where did you get that story, X? That sounds like another Maryjane story.

The Secret Service doesn't even have that many active agents on their payroll.

And where do you think the Chinese would put up a visiting contingent of over 1,000 people? A whole hotel for a few days -- and then it empties out when Bush leaves? :rolleyes:

That's really one of the most ridiculous stories I've heard so far.

It's true.....I read it on BBC months ago. Though I may have incorrectly remembered that it will be partially secret service agents, not entirely.

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