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Beijing Olympic Cauldron


mr.x
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Does anyone know how the flame will be lit for the Paralympics? The torch is at a pretty awkward position for a paraplegic.

Not every paralympian is a paraplegic. It could be done in the same way. Or could be done from a wire at the bottom. Or could be done like Torino or Barcelona. Wait and see.

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And how would they have lit the cauldron with that phoenix? If I understand that concept correctly, the Phoenix should only be a projection. That means that the cauldron would probably have had to be lit automatically, without using the original Olympic Flame.

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I guess they would have the phoenix run into the fuse, which even as it turned out, was quite some distance from the actual cauldron. The fuse was infront of the wall anyway, so i guess the wire that ran with the phoenix would be like the actual cauldron lighter .

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From what I understand/can make out from the illustrations - the torchbearer would light a fuse that would lead up the cauldron (just like what ended up happening, but the fuse would be fireworks until it began climbing up the scroll/cauldron where it was then a real flame). So the projection would make it appear as if the torchbearer had lit the phoenix’s beak, then it would "fly" into the scroll, lighting the cauldron. But it was too difficult to adequately project all this.

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  • 1 month later...

Hi,

now that the games are completely in the pages of history we can look forward to the future cauldrons... but

Does anyone have any idea of what became of the Beijing 2008 Cauldron? Like are they still displaying it someplace, or is it locked away in some warehouse destined to collect dust? Or completely dismantled and reused for other things (this would be really sad if they did this). <_< ??? Sydney's cauldron was turned into a fountain, still want to go see it... not too sure on Athens. Is there any legacy left by the cauldron and is there any more examples from past games??

Also, just wondering where that big painting from the opening ceremony went... like its final resting place??

Any information would be great!

Cheers.....

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Sydney's cauldron was turned into a fountain, still want to go see it... not too sure on Athens. Is there any legacy left by the cauldron and is there any more examples from past games??

Athens' cauldron is still at the stadium. It was designed by the same architect who designed the stadium's roof (Calatrava), so it doesn’t quite stick out like other cauldrons. I'm assuming that's why they’ve left it alone.

Atlanta's cauldron is still there much to the dismay of the Atlanta Braves - or so I've read. And so is Barcelona's, LA’s (obviously), Mexico City’s, and Berlin‘s.

I hope Beijing's keeps it's cauldron on display somehow outside the Nest. It’s quite a nice design.

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Athens' cauldron is still at the stadium. It was designed by the same architect who designed the stadium's roof (Calatrava), so it doesn’t quite stick out like other cauldrons. I'm assuming that's why they’ve left it alone.

Atlanta's cauldron is still there much to the dismay of the Atlanta Braves - or so I've read. And so is Barcelona's, LA’s (obviously), Mexico City’s, and Berlin‘s.

I hope Beijing's keeps it's cauldron on display somehow outside the Nest. It’s quite a nice design.

Why would the braves care?

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The cauldron is more "intrusive" than those of Athens, Barcelona, and LA to the function of the stadium so I doubt it will stay in place, although Seoul's giant tower appears to still be on the field (google maps satellite photos anyway). I would imagine Beijing's would be removed from the stadium and used as some sort of public art or monument to the 2008 Games in a location near the stadium...like what Sydney or Montreal have done. I wonder what happened to the Moscow's cauldron? The stadium gained a roof since 1980 so it must have been removed.

Edited by Kendegra
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Ok I didn't want to start a topic for this so I'll just pos it here. Tourists are being allowed to visit Beijing's Olympic venues during the country's National Day holidays:

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BEIJING, CHINA - SEPTEMBER 29:(CHINA OUT) Crowds of tourists gather in the Bird's Nest Stadium on September 29, 2008 in Beijing, China. Tourists from across China and abroad came to the the Olympic Green in Beijing to visit the competition venues on the first day of the week-long National Day holiday. Photo by Wang Lei/ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images

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BEIJING, CHINA - SEPTEMBER 29:(CHINA OUT) Visitors visit the Olympic Green on the first day of its opening to the public on September 29, 2008 in Beijing, China Tourists from across China and abroad came to the the Olympic Green in Beijing to visit the competition venues on the first day of the week-long National Day holiday. (Photo by Wang Lei/ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images)

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BEIJING, CHINA - SEPTEMBER 29: (CHINA OUT) A man poses for a photograph at the Bird's Nest stadium on September 29, 2008 in Beijing, China. Tourists from across China and abroad came to the the Olympic Green in Beijing to visit the competition venues on the first day of the week-long National Day holiday. (Photo by Wang Lei/ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images)

They clearly don’t have Olympic-fatigue.

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