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Beijing Olympic Cauldron


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It might. But I fail to see any dramatic impetus in it. OK, so it's on a track. A full once-around would probably be 2 minutes Too long; too plodding. OK, so it's moving on a track -- so what?

I think once the flame is lit, the fireworks will take over. A trip around the track will really not be dramatic.

No, of course the cauldron wouldn't move around the track already at the opening ceremony -- the wires above the stadium prevent that. It would rather stay stationary for the rest of the night until they (perhaps) remove the wires. And then, it could change its position during the Games, offering almost all spectators inside the stadium (and maybe also outside) a glimpse of the flame.

So in the end, that mysterious user "Leo Gemini" who spoke of a cauldron changing its configuration during the Games could turn out to be not totally on the wrong track.

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The cauldron will use a system of cables and be centred at the centre of the roof opening. It is just being constructed at that site.

No, of course the cauldron wouldn't move around the track already at the opening ceremony -- the wires above the stadium prevent that. It would rather stay stationary for the rest of the night until they (perhaps) remove the wires. And then, it could change its position during the Games, offering almost all spectators inside the stadium (and maybe also outside) a glimpse of the flame.

So in the end, that mysterious user "Leo Gemini" who spoke of a cauldron changing its configuration during the Games could turn out to be not totally on the wrong track.

well, we'll see. Maybe that's why it's so bulky -- so it will have enough fuel?

But at the same time, how would they refuel it at night if it's to be at different spots over the 17 days? I think it's going to be awfully risky to be refueling that thing every night (or maybe early morning I guess).

I think it's a rather ridiculous idea. I think it'll stay at one spot. Well, the test was rooted at one spot. It's not going to do that insane dance of fire. That's about as implausible as that hanging-in-the-middle of the air thingy!!

With that roof, you can't really do too many sane things.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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well, we'll see. Maybe that's why it's so bulky -- so it will have enough fuel?

But at the same time, how would they refuel it at night if it's to be at different spots over the 17 days? I think it's going to be awfully risky to be refueling that thing every night (or maybe early morning I guess).

Maybe there's a gas line inside that track?

I think it's a rather insane idea. I think it'll stay at one spot. Why did they pick that spot to build it? Why not some place right on the rim? :o

The cauldron will slide to the rim, that's what that track leading from the rubber hangar to the rim is for. And if it was positioned at the rim already at the beginning of the ceremony and thus was more visible, it would be less surprising.

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Or maybe the flame/torch/final torchbearer will travel around the roof track?

Yeah!! If he were 30 feet tall. How could you see a 5-6-foot person at the height? How would TV cameras cover him? You would have to have a secondary track around just so a camera crew could be there at eye level.

And what about when a hundred zillion fireworks go off? Don't you think these humans would get BBQ'ed up there? :rolleyes:

Ain't gonna happen.

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I think it's a rather ridiculous idea. I think it'll stay at one spot. Well, the test was rooted at one spot. It's not going to do that insane dance of fire. That's about as implausible as that hanging-in-the-middle of the air thingy!!

With that roof, you can't really do too many sane things.

Oh come on -- the roof is thick enough at each spot to bear a "wandering" cauldron. And how do you know for certain that the cauldron didn't move during the test? We only saw stills. Additionally, they probably didn't take a full circle with the cauldron anyway, since the wires are in the way.

Then, please explain to me why they have built such a track around the roof at all.

By the way: Didn't you want to announce the official (or rather your personal) lighting scheme yesterday? Keep the drawings coming!

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This is going too far.

You are mistaking a GUTTER for a cauldron track!! That is a gutter to collect rain water on that slanted roof when it rains.

Why is the track in its nesting area a double track? And then all of a sudden, it becomes one thin rail ON THE VERY RIM of the roof?

Please. :rolleyes:

Re my drawing, I got busy with other more pressing stuff and I've had a little condition on my middle finger which got worse today, so I probably can't do it.

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This is going too far.

You are mistaking a GUTTER for a cauldron track!! That is a gutter to collect rain water on that slanted roof when it rains.

Re my drawing, I got busy with other more pressing stuff and I've had a little condition on my middle finger which got worse today, so I can't do it.

Well, at least you're still fit enough to type. ;) Then you could at least describe your lighting scheme.

And a gutter for rain water which has walls? How shall the rain flow into that gutter with those walls?

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1. Well, at least you're still fit enough to type. ;) Then you could at least describe your lighting scheme.

2. And a gutter for rain water which has walls? How shall the rain flow into that gutter with those walls?

1. It's not so much the lighting m.o. It was what Ithought the cauldron might be. But it's got to be seen; words wouldn't do it justice.

2. The roof slants in. You have all those lights and other electrical stuff up there. THere has to be some gutter to collect rain water sliding down the slanted roof. The drain might be in one of those cross-bars. Or it could actually be a pyrotechnic rail.

Without a gutter, in a heavy rain, if an event were to continue, you would have like sheets of water falling down into the infield (or whereever the roof drop line is.)

Plus, see my other comments re the DOUBLE track!!

And, as you yourself pointed out there are at least a dozen camera guide-wires criss-crossing the empty space. So how would this thing get over those riggings that I believe won't go away for the duration of the Games?

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Why is the track in its nesting area a double track? And then all of a sudden, it becomes one thin rail ON THE VERY RIM of the roof?

Easy. On that double track, it slides down to the rim of the roof and to the all-around-the-roof track. There sits that holder -- which might be some kind of sled which is able to carry the cauldron around on that track.

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Nope. Ain't gonna happen. It's really a silly scenario -- especially with the weird shape of that thing. If it were an owl, yeah, maybe it could be whimsical or scary --- but it's some dinner-roll/puppa thingy.

And once the cascade of fireworks goes off, this cauldron really wouldn't be worth a second glance.

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And once the cascade of fireworks goes off, this cauldron really wouldn't be worth a second glance.

Once again: I think that during the rest of the opening ceremony, the cauldron will stay stationary anyway. Only in the course of the Games, it would start moving.

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If you're correct, I have to say it sounds rather gimmicky.

Well, isn't the whole concept of the Games, with all those bombastic venues etc., rather gimmicky? I simply can't imagine that the Chinese don't want an extra show effect for their cauldron -- especially considering the cauldron's rather unspectacular look. They would certainly want to pimp it a little.

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Many Chinese medias guess that ex-gymnast Li Ning would light the Olympic Cauldron...

Because they find some clue on the list of Beijing torchbearers. On this list, Li Ning has no check in time and place.

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It's confirmed now... it would be Li Ning, the gymastic 3-time gold medallist in LA!!

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Ha! What did I say? The first time in Olympic history that the final torch bearer soared to the cauldron. And what many of us predicted: The cauldron sits directly at the rim of the roof.

But I have to admit that it looks pretty permanent, so it will probably not move around the rim of the roof. The German commentators didn't mention such a feat either.

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Ha! What did I say? The first time in Olympic history that the final torch bearer soared to the cauldron. And what many of us predicted: The cauldron sits directly at the rim of the roof.

But I have to admit that it looks pretty permanent, so it will probably not move around the rim of the roof. The German commentators didn't mention such a feat either.

It looks you took an orgasm, that's pretty since 4 years we are waiting :lol:

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I thought the opening ceremony was a triumph of ideas, imagination and innovation. It has to be my favourite ppening ceremony after Barcelona 1992.

The narrative of the ceremony was genius in my opinion, with the 'Scroll & Picture' theme used to great effect in sharing the past, present and future of China (albeit a very abridged and sanitized version)..

It felt fluid from the very beginning, and kept my attention throughout. The special effects and images on the rim of the stadium were wonderful. The fact that the rim eventually formed part of the scroll and Olympic Torch was a real stroke of successful imagination. Simply a triumph!

Moreover the 'Picture' idea was the most original thing I've seen in any ceremony yet. What a great idea to have the athletes footprints form part of the final picture. Very symbolic and very effective.

It was SO refreshing not to be reminded of the origin of the Games themselves. How many times have we had to sit through 'Athenian/Greek' segments trying to educate us as to where the Games began. China decided to tell their story, and their story alone, and that's why it worked in my eyes. It didn't feel disjointed or muddled at all.

The 'global' music used during the athletes parade confused me slightly. Especially the continuous Scottish Bagpipes. :unsure: It seemed very misplaced somehow, though I appreciate the sentiment behind it. but that really is the only part in my mind that made me feel uneasy.

The torch itself reminds me of the one used in Atlanta - and there was us expecting a Bird or Phoenix. :P

However, this all makes me very worried about London's ceremonies. LOCOG really will have to think outside of the box to get anywhere close to what I've just witnessed on television. I wouldn't like to be in Seb Coe's position, that's for sure.

Well done Beijing. Breathtaking! :rolleyes:

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It was SO refreshing not to be reminded of the origin of the Games themselves. How many times have we had to sit through 'Athenian/Greek' segments trying to educate us as to where the Games began. China decided to tell their story, and their story alone, and that's why it worked in my eyes. It didn't feel disjointed or muddled at all.

Thanks for your very condensed review, Torch.

This comment of yours is interesting. Yeah, I think it can be skipped once in awhile, but for those being exposed to the idea of the Olympics for the first time, such a reminder of "Athenian/Greek" origins is signifcant, especially because the whole idea of history is VERY MUCH a part of the Olympics. And that's what makes it so special -- the continuation of a rite several centuries old, celebrating universality, peace and brotherhood.

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Thanks for your very condensed review, Torch.

This comment of yours is interesting. Yeah, I think it can be skipped once in awhile, but for those being exposed to the idea of the Olympics for the first time, such a reminder of "Athenian/Greek" origins is signifcant, especially because the whole idea of history is VERY MUCH a part of the Olympics. And that's what makes it so special -- the continuation of a rite several centuries old, celebrating universality, peace and brotherhood.

Agreed. I'm sure we'll see a definitive return to tradition and history in London. Though I'm certain that British history could easily be told in a similar fashion that Beijing presented.

The news stations here are reporting the ceremony, quite rightly, as a triumph "...surpassing all others" (ITV News/Channel 3) They made the point that London simply doesn't have the 'whatever it costs' budget that China has allowed for the Games. LOCOG say they are confident they can provide a spectacular ceremony, it just won't be on the scale seen in Beijing. A different, but spectacular opening ceremony, they are suggesting.

The mind boggles as to what Beijing will present in the Closing ceremony. Equally amazing, I should imagine.

Can't wait. :rolleyes:

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Altho of course, as everybody is, time zone by time zone, just recovering from the OC, Russia and Georgia are at each other's throats. Hmmm, I wonder if the IOC wil admonish those 2 countries in Beijing.

(I think Israel can now slip under the radar, disguise their jets as Russian -- and bomb Tehran's nuclear facilities.) He - he.

I won't get to see it until another 8 hours (being on the US West Coast.)

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We pretty much guessed how the cauldron would move to place itself, ready to be lighted. Hours gone by, I now remember reading someone here posting that the cauldron's tip had a length similar to the roof rim's thickness and that it seemed to have a groove pattern also similar to that which covered the rim - Well, whoever he/she was gave all the hints to what the cauldron would look like: an peeled strip of the roof rim, furled into a scaled-up version of the torch.

As predicted, those that had the 'unfortunate' luck of getting seats on the stands right below the torch saw zilch of the lighting and will keep not seeing it live in that place (at least, without TV assistance).

To be honest - I expected more. The artistic ceremony raised even more my expectations. It was nice but that aerial race by Li Ning was almost anti-climactic. Sydney's still has my heart.

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Shall we already start the speculation for the London 2012 cauldron lighting? ;)

I think there's still at least one possibility for London to have a first in Olympic cauldron lighting ceremonies: They could have five igniters from all five continents, maybe lighting the cauldron from different spots in the stadium.

And since I was right about the soaring final torch bearer in Beijing, I'll be proved correct again. ;)

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