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Is That True You Can't Bring Any Drinks Into The Venus?


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Ok, found this news report. Generally sayin that in order to prevent any potential copyrights stealing, no audiences would be allowed to bring any drinks or wearing highly commercialised shirts feature the brands of non-olympic sponsors in any of the venus of Beijing Games. So if you're feeling thirsty, then got to buy only Coca-Cola..... SO I admit I'm a bit shock of this. Does anyone know this is the real tradition passes by every Olympic games since the last decade?

7月11日起,北京市将进行广告控制,非奥运合作企业——

广告请勿“傍”奥运

奥运场馆内,观众不能统一穿带有广告色彩的服装,喝非赞助商饮料

人民网北京7月5日电 从7月11日开始,北京将对主要地区、机场、车站、奥运场馆周边地区进行广告控制。

任何非奥运合作企业,在广告宣传中不得使用奥林匹克标志或相关元素。媒体开办奥运相关栏目,也不得与非奥运合作企业合作。未经授权以本届奥运会参赛运动员、教练员、官员等作形象代言人的广告,相关媒体要停播。就是现场观众,比赛期间也不能穿带有广告色彩的服装。

“防范隐性市场行为,不仅是维护奥运合作企业合法权益的需要,也是我们与国际奥委会签订的一系列合同中作出的承诺,它还是2008年北京奥运会成功举办的重要标志之一。”北京奥组委市场开发部副部长陈锋说,这些隐性广告禁令将一直持续到9月17日北京残奥会结束,但中国政府保护奥林匹克知识产权的努力会持续下去,不会局限在奥运会举办期间。

据介绍,实行广告控制的目的,一是用于宣传奥运、宣传举办城市。二是从北京奥组委的角度明确赞助企业的地位。三是支持赞助企业的营销宣传。

陈锋说,北京奥运会的赞助商依法享有使用奥林匹克知识产权进行市场营销的权利。只有保障好市场营销权,才能保护奥运合作企业支持奥运的积极性,才能促进奥林匹克运动的良性发展。

鉴于隐性广告为隐性市场行为的主要表现形式,北京奥组委将会对电视媒体、平面媒体以及因特网进行监控,从源头上防范隐性市场行为。

奥运火炬传递期间,非奥运赞助企业用火炬形象做广告,非奥运合作企业在广告宣传中使用奥林匹克标志、或使用“激情2008”、“奔向2008”等元素,媒体开办奥运相关栏目时与非奥运合作企业合作或者做广告,这些都在禁止之列。

北京奥组委发现问题后,首先将同行为人沟通,告知对方停止该行为。如果这种行为已经在事实上构成侵权,工商行政管理部门将依照《奥林匹克知识产权保护条例》进行处理。

中国广告协会也将切实履行行业引导和监督的职责,对发现问题采取前两次劝诫、第三次通报批评的做法。对典型性问题,中国广告协会还会通过大众传媒作公开点评。

北京奥运会对观众的穿着本来没有特别的限制,但观众不能统一穿带有广告色彩的服装,喝非赞助商饮料,进行隐性广告市场活动,这种群体性行为将被严格限制。北京奥组委在奥运门票上专门注明了相关规定:所有饮料都禁止带入场馆,观众可以在场馆内购买奥组委指定品牌饮料。同时,比赛时场馆内还将有专人负责检查,如果发现有不符合规定的服装进入场馆,工作人员将会用带有奥运会标志的不干胶贴在涉嫌广告标志上。

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You CANNOT bring any liquids into the venues, that includes drinks and that includes drinks from the official sponsor, Coca-Cola. This is a security measure, not a revenue protection effort. You should assume that the security at the checkpoints (which are generally at a distance from the venues themselves) is as stringent as airport security checkpoints. Even liquids such as eye drops, etc. will be questioned and very possibly confiscated.

I doubt that if an individual shows up wearing a Hewlett-Packard T-shirt instead of a Lenovo one, that anybody will care. However, if 5 busloads of 200 people show up wearing H-P, that might provoke some interesting dialogues in real time.

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As for the thirsty crowds, Coca-Cola is the official sponsor of all non-alcoholic beverages, and only their products will be sold in the concession stands. Based on my own observations at various test events, the #1 seller was water, followed by their non-fizzy locally produced drinks, and only distantly the standard carbonated cola.

This setup is nothing new for 2008, it's been this way for some time. Otherwise, why would any company ever want to be a sponsor. I assure you, for what KO (and the other sponsors) had to deal with/put up with under BOCOG these last few years, being allowed to provide beverages to the concessionaires is small compensation.

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I remember the IOC warned the Dutch NOC because a few Dutch spectators had shirts with to large names of non-sponsors on it.

But yes, I think the liquids is a case of security. In the Vatican city also all bottles were taken by the security, on airports it's the same, our Houses of parliament also.

But there was a post here somewhere, and someone stated a bottle in China will cost 30 cents?

Can we take sun protection with us in to the venue? That's maybe easy if it's an outside venue.

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It is standard practice at all major sports events these days to confiscate any food/drink items not purchased onsite. The kiosks/concessions are businesses and know they can jack up the price to whatever level they want. At AFL (Aussie rules football) matches a 600ml Coke goes for $4.50. Coke has exclusive rights at most grounds. Of course I could get the same drink for $1.50 at a supermarket...

As for Beijing prices - the standard price for a bottle of Coke (500ml or so) is 3-4yuan at most kiosks in the touristy areas. That's around 50cents-70cents US. You can get them cheaper elsewhere - water and a non carbonated orange kind of drink (cant remember what it is called but is like very sweet orange juice - but that fake orange taste - like Fanta gone flat almost) is cheaper - 2 yuan (30-40 cents) is about standard. I'd expect prices to be considerably dearer at the Games venues though.

Beijing as a whole is very cheap for food and drink. You can spend next to nothing and eat very well. You can also spend a LOT of money in some establishments! I was surprised that McDonalds was around 24-28 yuan for a large meal - so thats about $4US or so - not much difference there!

I personally am budgeting (after accomodation) around $50 a day. Of course I will probably spend much more on pins/shirts etc but with transport so cheap (and whatever remaining Olympic tickets will also be quite cheap), 250-300 yuan is more than enough to live very well.

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