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CAPE TOWN 2020


Rafa

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i count 22. No offence, but to me that isnt many. Consider the numbers that are seen at large tennis clubs across most modernised cities.

I'm just glad the tennis arena will be built by 2011. There are tons of tennis courts and clubs across the city and only a few of these courts were being used adequately. Western Province Tennis will make this their new home and are currently in negotiation with the ATP/WTA to bring international tennis events to Cape Town to support the viability of the tennis arena.

As for Olympic standards/ requirements

Ten courts are needed and the site provides adequate space for these. Temporary seating would suffice for courts 1 and 2, with portions of the urban park used if space becomes an issue. The biggest drawcard is location, location, location.

In total there are 24 courts visible in the diagram. There are also 5 courts to the south east of the tennis arena which are visible in the plan as a green rectangle below the white building, and are visible in the photograph.

In total we are looking at 29 courts.

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World's largest timed cycling event starts super year of cycling events for Cape Town

Cape Town is also currently hosting the Absa Cape Epic, the world's largest time trial mountain bike race( also the most televised) and will host the UCI World Junior Cycling Championships later this year.

Robert Hunter wins Cape Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour

(Cape Town, 9 March 2008) Spectacular wins and shattered records marked the 2008 Cape Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour ( the world's largest timed cycling event) on Sunday, when 35,000 cyclists from around the world gathered once again to participate in the world’s largest timed cycling event.

The action started early in the morning when Barloworld’s Robert Hunter outsprinted the elite men’s breakaway bunch in the last few metres to the finish to take his second consecutive Cycle Tour win in a time of 2h27’30” – breaking the current route record by about 5 minutes.

In what appeared to be a photo finish, Nolan Hoffman from Team Neotel and Malcolm Lange from MTN Energade came in second and third respectively.

Some twenty minutes later, 18-year-old Cherise Taylor became the youngest female in Cycle Tour history to take an elite women’s category win in a time of 2h50’52”. Lynette Burger took second place while race favourite, Anriette Schoeman, finished in third position.

Great day for cycling

David Bellairs, co-director of the Cape Town Pick n Pay Cycle Tour, described the weather conditions as “ideal”. While the day initially started warm and got hotter as the morning progressed, the fog started to roll in after lunch to provide welcome relief to the back-markers on the route.

“Today has been wonderful,” adds Bellairs. “Crowd support was amazing along the route and the cyclists shared an amazing spirit.

“Cycle Tour is about much more than just the top cyclists and winners. This is the only event where a fun rider can rub shoulders with the likes of Tour de France great, Jan Ulrich, and where a top cyclist who finishes the course in two-and-a-half-hours receives as much support as the father and son on a tandem whose only aim it is to finish within the allocated seven hours.”

It has also been a day of cycling heroes: from Japie Malan, the oldest participant in Cycle Tour history who, at 88 years old, finished yet another Cycle Tour, to the handful of men who have just finished their 31st Cycle Tour.

Bumps and bruises as expected

There were a number of falls, crashes, bumps and bruises during the course of the day. While the majority of these incidents were treated on site, around 65 individuals were sent to the nearest hospital for further treatment and/or assessment. Three of these referrals were serious, there were no fatalities. At the time of going to print it was still unclear how many of these participants were admitted for an overnight stay.

HunterCap.jpg

CheriseTaylorCap.jpg

TandemCap.jpg

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A perfect race

10 March, 2008

Cape Argus

Cyclists and organisers share Italian race chief's verdict

Andisiwe Makinana

A perfect race. That was the verdict on yesterday's 31st Cape Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour by prominent visitor Arrigo Vanzolini, president of the Nove Colli, one of the biggest Italian cycle races.

It was an assessment shared by the local organisers and many of the cyclists from 73 countries who tackled the 109 scenic kilometres around the Peninsula.

The weather was described as "fantastic" by both riders and spectators, with a maximum 27.6°C, 50% humidity, a fine fog from noon and a moderate westerly wind.

Vanzolini was among the thousands of spectators who lined the route from as early as 5.30am, standing, sitting on camp seats with picnic baskets, dancing and blowing vuvuzelas.

From Woodstock and the southern suburbs to Miller's Point, Ocean View and Camps Bay, people cheered and waved the South African flag as music blasted in the background.

Vanzolini applauded the organisation of the race, which he said had great ambience.

"We are here to exchange ideas, to learn from them as well as to impart information. So far I can't tell them where to improve it's perfect," he said, speaking through an interpreter.

Robbie Hunter of Team Barlo-world won in a record time of two hours 27 minutes 30 seconds. It was his second win in a row.

He left the country immediately to compete in Switzerland.

The winner of the women's race, Cherise Taylor of Pretoria, is the youngest victor of the tour at 18.

She said she had encountered no problems and described the race as "brilliant".

Taylor sprinted to victory in 2 hours 52 minutes. In doing so she won a trip to race in the Nove Colli, which will be held in Cesenatico, Italy, on May 18. The event attracts around 11 000 cyclists.

Of an estimated 32 000 cyclists who registered for the Cape Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour, 2 310 were foreign visitors.

Among the South Africans in the saddle, 1 695 were from the Eastern Cape, 1 354 from the Free State, 2 012 from KwaZulu-Natal, 370 from Limpopo, 788 from Mpumalanga, 842 from North West and 711 from the Northern Cape.

The greatest number of visitors, 11 410, came from Gauteng, and there were 18 243 local riders registered. Race organisers reported 80 incidents during the race, with 75 people being referred to hospital, but only 19 detained overnight, two with serious head injuries, tour director David Bellairs said early today.

Medical officer Dr Sue le Roux said there had been a lot of cases of chest pain, which could have been heart-related or due to other causes, such as bronchitis.

Robbie Hunter said conditions had been "slightly better" this year than last. He won a stage in last year's Tour de France, and hopes for "another stage victory or two".

He has also set his sights on competing in the Olympic Games in Beijing later this year.

Taylor, who finished second in last year's tour, said: "I'm looking forward to the Olympics as well as the world champs later this year. Things are looking really good."

It was a double celebration for second-placed Lynette Burger, 27, whose boyfriend and manager David Pieterse proposed on Saturday.

Meanwhile, multiple Cape Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour winner and Olympian cyclist Anriette Schoeman has called for separate finishes for women and men.

Schoeman, a five-time winner who finished third yesterday, said that she had experienced "chaotic events" about 5km from the finish line.

She avoided a crash one kilometre from the finish line, which she said was due to male cyclists "pushing over the women".

"I'd suggest that in future the organisers separate women from men, about five minutes from the finish line," she said.

But Bellairs said separating the two races was not feasible.

It would be also be unfair to men who had trained as hard and travelled long distances to participate, only to be told five minutes from the finish line that they had to stop and wait for the women to finish.

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If Rio wins for 2016, CT has more posibilities to realize that in 2020.

I firmly believe that a Rio 2016 will kill off a Capetown 2020 challenge _ two southern hemisphere new frontier Olympics in a row? Now a chance.

(mind you, I just posted that to bump the Dubai-Copenhagen thread out of the top spot)

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  • 2 weeks later...
No. It's because TWO back-to-back Southern hemisphere Olympics AIN'T GONNA HAPPEN in a MILLION YEARS. FIFA is an entirely different ballgame from the IOC.

Wait a minute! Baron, do you actually work for the IOC? How do you know that two back-to-back Southern hemisphere Olympics aren't going to work?

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He doesn't, but he's taken an educated guess that a Rio victory in 2016 will all but kill-off Cape Town's chance in 2020. And I agree with him, which is partly why I don't want to see Rio win as I'd like to see an African Olympics in 2020.

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He doesn't, but he's taken an educated guess that a Rio victory in 2016 will all but kill-off Cape Town's chance in 2020. And I agree with him, which is partly why I don't want to see Rio win as I'd like to see an African Olympics in 2020.

Huh.. I am supporting both and I believe it can be possible.

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Wait a minute! Baron, do you actually work for the IOC?

I'm not supposed to say so. My contract forbids it; but the IOC bounces some of their wacky ideas off of me (being Baron Pierre's great-grandson and all that, james); and I told them "No way' on that.

So there.

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in the words of a fellow forumer : "leave africa alone"..you colonialists. :)

your continent is not alone Mo Rush u.u

Latin America and Africa are considered the black sheeps of the IOC, just because those part of the world are not too rich like another continents... :rolleyes:

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your continent is not alone Mo Rush u.u

Latin America and Africa are considered the black sheeps of the IOC, just because those part of the world are not too rich like another continents... :rolleyes:

It's not a matter of being rich or not.

#1 - There has only been 1 So. American-African bid with any credibility: Buenos Aires 1956... when ARGENTINA was still a HAVE country.

#2 - The IOC wants to see that it awards the Games to countries that can spend on this responsibly. Does Montreal 1976 ever ring a bell, Tatsh?

Jeez, HOW MANY TIMES must that be explained to newbies? :angry:

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And yet Beijing and Sochi were chosen. ;)

Because they can AFFORD it.

By responsibly, I mean FISCALLY responsibly -- regardless of the political colors. DON'T TWIST MY WORDS.

It is after all a UNIVERSAL movement.

I really hate that when my words are taken out of context, especially by people who understand English plainly enough. :angry:

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It's not a matter of being rich or not.

#1 - There has only been 1 So. American-African bid with any credibility: Buenos Aires 1956... when ARGENTINA was still a HAVE country.

Buenos Aires 2004 was a very credible bid (back in 1997, the financial crisis hasn't started yet)

#2 - The IOC wants to see that it awards the Games to countries that can spend on this responsibly. Does Montreal 1976 ever ring a bell, Tatsh?

Montreal had two problems that can explain the financial results of the Games:

  • the organizers didn't make a distinction between the OCOG and non-OCOG budgets, which means that some infrastructure investments were directly associated with the Games budget,
  • there was a little something back then called an oil crisis (back in 1973) that sent some construction material as well as wages shyrocketing, contributing to increasing the construction budget to several times what it was in the late 60s when Montreal applied for the Games

So I am afraid it's a little more complicated than "not spending responsibly"...

BTW, what's the name is this Canadian city that was elected to host the 1988 Games, a mere 5 years after Montreal?

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1. Buenos Aires 2004 was a very credible bid (back in 1997, the financial crisis hasn't started yet)

2. Montreal had two problems that can explain the financial results of the Games:

  • the organizers didn't make a distinction between the OCOG and non-OCOG budgets, which means that some infrastructure investments were directly associated with the Games budget,
  • there was a little something back then called an oil crisis (back in 1973) that sent some construction material as well as wages shyrocketing, contributing to increasing the construction budget to several times what it was in the late 60s when Montreal applied for the Games

So I am afraid it's a little more complicated than "not spending responsibly"...

BTW, what's the name is this Canadian city that was elected to host the 1988 Games, a mere 5 years after Montreal?

1. I know about BA-2004. But did it make it to the short list? And WHAT if it got awarded the Games and then the financial crisis hit? :blink::blink:

2. Precisely, again, if those Games got awarded to a borderline-developed country, would it have had the reserves Canada had to still stage the Games and not have kids go to sleep hungry at night simply because it had to fulfill an IOC, sports-event commitment? :o

THat's my WHOLE POINT to Tatsh (and in a way, to know-it-all james and those crazy Brazilians :wacko:), that's why the IOC has avoided So. America and Africa. But hey you know, to silence these cries of the IOC discriminating against Africa and So. America, I hope the IOC soon awards the Games to countries like Haiti and Rwanda!! I really do. See if I care.

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