Jump to content

Beijing Approves Olympics 'cheer'


Recommended Posts

Beijing Olympic chiefs are introducing an official cheer for patriotic spectators to spur on Team China at the Games, Chinese media reports.

The authoritative, four-part Olympic cheer, accompanied by detailed instructions, will be promoted on TV, in schools and with a poster campaign.

It involves clapping twice, giving the thumbs-up, clapping twice more and then punching the air with both arms.

The cheer is accompanied by chants of "Olympics", "Let's go" and "China".

The Beijing Olympic Organising Committee has hired 30 cheering squads who will show spectators how it is done at Games stadia, reports Xinhua state media.

'Civilized cheering'

A committee official said the simple chants and gestures were designed to help spectators cheer for their favourite athletes in a smooth, civilized manner.

The Ministry of Education is also arranging special training sessions in schools for the 800,000 students who are expected to attend the Games.

Li Ning, president of the Beijing Etiquette Institute, told the Beijing News that the cheer was in line with general international principles for cheering, while at the same time possessing characteristics of Chinese culture.

_44720929_china_cheer.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since we now have an official Chinese cheer, I guess that opens the door for other nations to also come up with their official cheers, too. Let's get some suggestions together so we can practice ahead of time. How about starting with an Oz cheer--lots of Aussies seem to be attending the Games, never shy about raising their voices, just all-around naturals for coming up with a lusty Olympic cheer. Who will start us off with some suggestions (don't forget the hand motions!)?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why? Because it's pretty ridiculous for something like this to be introduced, but I suppose with Beijing's case, it’s probably not the most surprising thing.

that's usually the national cheer for the host nation, it's been a trend since 2002 World Cup in Korea & Japan and 2004 Olympics in Athens. So it's not surprising for sure. You're living on Mars, aren't you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

that's usually the national cheer for the host nation, it's been a trend since 2002 World Cup in Korea & Japan and 2004 Olympics in Athens. So it's not surprising for sure. You're living on Mars, aren't you?

It's not something I've heard of before. How many nations have a 'national cheer' then? Is it an Asian thing or just Chinese??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

that's usually the national cheer for the host nation, it's been a trend since 2002 World Cup in Korea & Japan and 2004 Olympics in Athens. So it's not surprising for sure. You're living on Mars, aren't you?

I don't think that the people in Korea, Japan and Greece were told before by some officials how they had to cheer. Fans all over the world have their respective traditional cheers, yes. For example, "Aussie, Aussie, Aussie -- Oi, Oi, Oi!", "Hup, Holland, Hup", "Hopp, Schwiiz", "USA! USA!" or "El-las! El-las!". But the fans usually choose those cheers on their own, without some sort of governmental (or organising commitee) order.

That's why that idea of BOCOG appears pretty strange. Why don't they act more spontaneous and let the Chinese develop their own way of Olympic cheering?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think that the people in Korea, Japan and Greece were told before by some officials how they had to cheer. Fans all over the world have their respective traditional cheers, yes. For example, "Aussie, Aussie, Aussie -- Oi, Oi, Oi!", "Hup, Holland, Hup", "Hopp, Schwiiz", "USA! USA!" or "El-las! El-las!". But the fans usually choose those cheers on their own, without some sort of governmental (or organising commitee) order.

That's why that idea of BOCOG appears pretty strange. Why don't they act more spontaneous and let the Chinese develop their own way of Olympic cheering?

Slightly off point but I didnt know about that Aussie, Aussie, Aussie chat which I am presuming is Australian. Does it come from the old British chant Oggie, oggie, oggie?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Slightly off point but I didnt know about that Aussie, Aussie, Aussie chat which I am presuming is Australian. Does it come from the old British chant Oggie, oggie, oggie?

Obviously yes. Until a few minutes ago, I didn't know that "Oggie, Oggie, Oggie" chant.

Wikipedia - Aussie Aussie Aussie, Oi Oi Oi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think that the people in Korea, Japan and Greece were told before by some officials how they had to cheer. Fans all over the world have their respective traditional cheers, yes. For example, "Aussie, Aussie, Aussie -- Oi, Oi, Oi!", "Hup, Holland, Hup", "Hopp, Schwiiz", "USA! USA!" or "El-las! El-las!". But the fans usually choose those cheers on their own, without some sort of governmental (or organising commitee) order.

That's why that idea of BOCOG appears pretty strange. Why don't they act more spontaneous and let the Chinese develop their own way of Olympic cheering?

2008060519475978807.jpg

200806051934179801b.jpg

That's exactly what I talking about. However, one thing to be confirmed is BOCOG trying hard to promote a much more ''civilized cheering'' because of the ''Beijing Swearing'' history among many major events in the past. You might say that's a Beijing folk thing, but in fact it's a rubbish sight just similar to the Football hooliganism. Well, so it seems they have to pour out sth positive for the local just ahead of the major international event goes.

And don't make a sterotype really, the new ''official cheering'' is just been set up as for the welcoming programme, it's not a law or a must. In fact, if you have read many Chinese comments on this, they would not even give a fck for this.

well, who knows. At least nobody wants to experience the same feeling that Sharapova recieved in the French Open recently.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Obviously yes. Until a few minutes ago, I didn't know that "Oggie, Oggie, Oggie" chant.

Wikipedia - Aussie Aussie Aussie, Oi Oi Oi

As an Aussie sports supporter I really hope that we don’t hear the Aussie Aussie Aussie oi oi oi chant in Beijing. I know an Australian sport supporter/tour group called “The Fanatics” have officially banned the chant when they attend sporting events The Fanatics will be in Beijing and they always have new and interesting chants.

Although the chant was great during the Sydney games and got locals and Internationals involved I feel Australia and Australian supporters have grown up since then and its time to leave that chant in the past. I was also wrongly used in the Cronulla riots in 2005 and that’s enough for me to not be par taking in the chant if it is started in Beijing but other Australians.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

CCTV-International interviewed Juan Antonio Samaranch, and at the very end of the segment they cut to the old man standing up, saying something to the extent of "Go China! Best Games Ever!", all while doing this exact same cheer. Pretty funny, to say the least.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...