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Personal Experience Of The Torch Relay And An Article


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(my apology; pls ignore the other message with my account name as title; my comment did not get italized in the other email)

Well, I stopped over in HK this long weekend, and witnessed the torch relay. Seeing it for myself, and now I am back to the hotel checking out what is reported in the media, via quite a number of media around the world. I come across this article in reuters, and wow, comparing to what I actually see, if this reporter can call himself a reporter with impartiality and professionlism, I can only say god bless the mighty freedom of speech.

Torch draws mass support and protest

By James Pomfret

HONG KONG (Reuters) - The Olympic torch was run through Hong Kong on Friday in a festive return to China after a troubled world tour, but tensions flared as patriotic crowds heckled protesters and police briefly detained eight activists.

The torch's five-continent journey has been dogged by demonstrations, mostly over China's crackdown against protests in Tibet, which have deeply embarrassed Beijing and provoked retaliatory rallies at home and abroad by patriotic Chinese.

Seemingly bowing to international pressure on Tibet, Beijing said last week it would meet envoys of the Dalai Lama, Tibet's spiritual leader.

On Friday, the Tibetan government-in-exile, which is based in India, said its officials would arrive in China on Saturday for "informal" talks.

China has blamed the exiled Buddhist leader's "clique" for unrest across Lhasa and other Tibetan areas, which it says was aimed at upstaging the Beijing Olympics in August.

In Hong Kong, security around the flame was tight, with roads closed, crowds kept at a distance, and at times as many as 16 Chinese torch security guards in blue and white track suits and police on motorcycles alongside the torch bearers.

All along the torch's route, tens of thousands of cheering citizens packed sidewalks and strained for a glimpse of the flame as it winded its way across the territory by foot, dragon boat and horseback, as well as by yacht across the city's iconic harbor.

Despite the outpouring of support, small bands of demonstrators confined to protest pens along the route demanded Beijing honor its Olympics human rights promises, but were confronted at times by bristling crowds. Continued...

Early in the day, torch supporters surrounded and shouted profanities at a small group of demonstrators calling for religious freedom and brandishing a Tibetan flag.

Police tried to prevent them from raising the flag and led the eight protesters to a van, along with a Chinese man who'd tried to snatch away their flag. They were later released and told they had been taken away for their own safety.

"It was a very dirty trick because I think it was a political decision to remove us 10 minutes before the torch got there," Christina Chan, one of the protesters told Reuters.

Comment: This is so factually twisted by this reporter, or this reporter just plain reported selectively. From reading these 3 sentences, an ordinary reader would get the impression that the police did not allow the girl to show the flag at all, and there was no tolerance for other voices in the event. I was there witnessing how this event developed. There was designated protesting area, but this girl did not observe the rule. The police did indeed let her and her fellow protesters wave the flag for at least half an hour they were there, and not until 10 minutes before the relay that they started inflicting responses by marching into the sea of supporters. The police formed the circle around these 4 people all through to protect them. Yes, this action did inflict the response it's meant by the relay supporters, but not only until this 30+ reporters with big cameras and stands, 1 being this reporter of this article I presume, trying to take pictures of them when the crowd start to get out of control. Not only when there was so much pushing among the reporters and some tried to interview this girl that the police took her to a restricted area, and this girl went nuts lying on the floor crying and tried to climb onto an elevated platform when the police grabbed her flag and took her to a van.

I am sure this reporter has witnessed all these, and of course he had every right to report however and how much he wants. But if he thinks the reported the whole truth, shame on him.

Another lone elderly protester holding a placard urging dialogue between the Chinese government and the Dalai Lama was circled by shouting bystanders who tore his clothing, called him a traitor and said he was "mentally sick".

"I was just expressing my opinion. What right do they have to treat me like this? They are uncivilized!" said the man, 72-year-old cab driver Ng Pun-tuk.

Comment: I have not seen this incident unfolding, and it's very interesting that there are a lot more silent and peaceful protest without no interruption that this reporter chose not to report. As well, it is very interesting to see how this reporter can report in such an engaged way on the exchanges among the locals, and how he got this idea from a 72year-old Chinese cab driver.

SOLEMN HONOUR

Authorities in the former British colony have drawn criticism for taking an uncharacteristically tough line including blocking several people from entering the city, among them three pro-Tibet campaigners and a Danish artist and rights activist.

comment: Sure, as if it's something uninvented by the democracies during G8/ WTO meetings, and something unique to commie countries

"It is a great and solemn honor for Hong Kong, Asia's world city, to welcome back the Olympic flame on behalf of our proud nation," Hong Kong leader Donald Tsang said at the relay's start.

A march by a pro-democracy group which holds an annual commemoration for the Tiananmen square crackdown in Beijing in 1989, was shadowed every step of the way by crowds of chanting Olympics supporters who tried to slow their progress. Continued...

Elsewhere, Chinese university students waved national flags in front of protesters' banners, and shouted and sang the national anthem to try to drown out the calls for democracy.

Comment: Again, that's another cheap association and imposition on others' thoughts, as if the supporters are not tolerant of other people's voice. Interesting he chose to selectively report the fact that there are thousands others at the same time sang the anthems not for the sake of covering other people's voice, and that the blocks around the route were completely jammed and yet these protestors chose to march on the totally packed streets

"We are here peacefully to express our ideals that we love China and the motherland," said one, named Yu Xiang.

In the United States, conservative and liberal members of Congress joined forces to urge a U.S. government boycott of the opening ceremony of the Games, accusing China of gross human rights violations.

After Hong Kong, the torch goes to the Chinese gambling hub Macau and then starts its journey through the mainland. A sister flame is awaiting good weather to summit Mount Everest.

Many expect the flame to now have a smooth run on Chinese soil with the possible exception of its Tibet leg in mid-June, leading up to the August 8 opening ceremony in Beijing.

(Additional reporting by Alistair Scrutton in New Delhi; Editing by John Ruwitch and Jeremy Laurence)

Comment: Again, I maintain my proposition to not take the face value of what you see in the media for your judgement. Do not take it for granted on what you see, and always read with conscious skepticism. While good reporting can promote understanding on the peopls and deeds around you, unprofessional ones would instill and enforce prejudice gaps among people.

Again, I am just taking this particular reporting and contrast with my actual experience. Please do not extrapolate anything else and take it too personally.

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(my apology; pls ignore the other message with my account name as title; my comment did not get italized in the other email)

Well, I stopped over in HK this long weekend, and witnessed the torch relay. Seeing it for myself, and now I am back to the hotel checking out what is reported in the media, via quite a number of media around the world. I come across this article in reuters, and wow, comparing to what I actually see, if this reporter can call himself a reporter with impartiality and professionlism, I can only say god bless the mighty freedom of speech.

Torch draws mass support and protest

By James Pomfret

HONG KONG (Reuters) - The Olympic torch was run through Hong Kong on Friday in a festive return to China after a troubled world tour, but tensions flared as patriotic crowds heckled protesters and police briefly detained eight activists.

The torch's five-continent journey has been dogged by demonstrations, mostly over China's crackdown against protests in Tibet, which have deeply embarrassed Beijing and provoked retaliatory rallies at home and abroad by patriotic Chinese.

Seemingly bowing to international pressure on Tibet, Beijing said last week it would meet envoys of the Dalai Lama, Tibet's spiritual leader.

On Friday, the Tibetan government-in-exile, which is based in India, said its officials would arrive in China on Saturday for "informal" talks.

China has blamed the exiled Buddhist leader's "clique" for unrest across Lhasa and other Tibetan areas, which it says was aimed at upstaging the Beijing Olympics in August.

In Hong Kong, security around the flame was tight, with roads closed, crowds kept at a distance, and at times as many as 16 Chinese torch security guards in blue and white track suits and police on motorcycles alongside the torch bearers.

All along the torch's route, tens of thousands of cheering citizens packed sidewalks and strained for a glimpse of the flame as it winded its way across the territory by foot, dragon boat and horseback, as well as by yacht across the city's iconic harbor.

Despite the outpouring of support, small bands of demonstrators confined to protest pens along the route demanded Beijing honor its Olympics human rights promises, but were confronted at times by bristling crowds. Continued...

Early in the day, torch supporters surrounded and shouted profanities at a small group of demonstrators calling for religious freedom and brandishing a Tibetan flag.

Police tried to prevent them from raising the flag and led the eight protesters to a van, along with a Chinese man who'd tried to snatch away their flag. They were later released and told they had been taken away for their own safety.

"It was a very dirty trick because I think it was a political decision to remove us 10 minutes before the torch got there," Christina Chan, one of the protesters told Reuters.

Comment: This is so factually twisted by this reporter, or this reporter just plain reported selectively. From reading these 3 sentences, an ordinary reader would get the impression that the police did not allow the girl to show the flag at all, and there was no tolerance for other voices in the event. I was there witnessing how this event developed. There was designated protesting area, but this girl did not observe the rule. The police did indeed let her and her fellow protesters wave the flag for at least half an hour they were there, and not until 10 minutes before the relay that they started inflicting responses by marching into the sea of supporters. The police formed the circle around these 4 people all through to protect them. Yes, this action did inflict the response it's meant by the relay supporters, but not only until this 30+ reporters with big cameras and stands, 1 being this reporter of this article I presume, trying to take pictures of them when the crowd start to get out of control. Not only when there was so much pushing among the reporters and some tried to interview this girl that the police took her to a restricted area, and this girl went nuts lying on the floor crying and tried to climb onto an elevated platform when the police grabbed her flag and took her to a van.

I am sure this reporter has witnessed all these, and of course he had every right to report however and how much he wants. But if he thinks the reported the whole truth, shame on him.

Another lone elderly protester holding a placard urging dialogue between the Chinese government and the Dalai Lama was circled by shouting bystanders who tore his clothing, called him a traitor and said he was "mentally sick".

"I was just expressing my opinion. What right do they have to treat me like this? They are uncivilized!" said the man, 72-year-old cab driver Ng Pun-tuk.

Comment: I have not seen this incident unfolding, and it's very interesting that there are a lot more silent and peaceful protest without no interruption that this reporter chose not to report. As well, it is very interesting to see how this reporter can report in such an engaged way on the exchanges among the locals, and how he got this idea from a 72year-old Chinese cab driver.

SOLEMN HONOUR

Authorities in the former British colony have drawn criticism for taking an uncharacteristically tough line including blocking several people from entering the city, among them three pro-Tibet campaigners and a Danish artist and rights activist.

comment: Sure, as if it's something uninvented by the democracies during G8/ WTO meetings, and something unique to commie countries

"It is a great and solemn honor for Hong Kong, Asia's world city, to welcome back the Olympic flame on behalf of our proud nation," Hong Kong leader Donald Tsang said at the relay's start.

A march by a pro-democracy group which holds an annual commemoration for the Tiananmen square crackdown in Beijing in 1989, was shadowed every step of the way by crowds of chanting Olympics supporters who tried to slow their progress. Continued...

Elsewhere, Chinese university students waved national flags in front of protesters' banners, and shouted and sang the national anthem to try to drown out the calls for democracy.

Comment: Again, that's another cheap association and imposition on others' thoughts, as if the supporters are not tolerant of other people's voice. Interesting he chose to selectively report the fact that there are thousands others at the same time sang the anthems not for the sake of covering other people's voice, and that the blocks around the route were completely jammed and yet these protestors chose to march on the totally packed streets

"We are here peacefully to express our ideals that we love China and the motherland," said one, named Yu Xiang.

In the United States, conservative and liberal members of Congress joined forces to urge a U.S. government boycott of the opening ceremony of the Games, accusing China of gross human rights violations.

After Hong Kong, the torch goes to the Chinese gambling hub Macau and then starts its journey through the mainland. A sister flame is awaiting good weather to summit Mount Everest.

Many expect the flame to now have a smooth run on Chinese soil with the possible exception of its Tibet leg in mid-June, leading up to the August 8 opening ceremony in Beijing.

(Additional reporting by Alistair Scrutton in New Delhi; Editing by John Ruwitch and Jeremy Laurence)

Comment: Again, I maintain my proposition to not take the face value of what you see in the media for your judgement. Do not take it for granted on what you see, and always read with conscious skepticism. While good reporting can promote understanding on the peopls and deeds around you, unprofessional ones would instill and enforce prejudice gaps among people.

Again, I am just taking this particular reporting and contrast with my actual experience. Please do not extrapolate anything else and take it too personally.

Hong Kong Media also reported the protests and relavant support actions by the local people. It's not that complicated, either support and protest.

I think your news speaks much more open than some of other medias.

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Hong Kong Media also reported the protests and relavant support actions by the local people. It's not that complicated, either support and protest.

I think your news speaks much more open than some of other medias.

An "open" and "objective" press seems to continue to ellude those who clamour for the former without considering the later.

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An "open" and "objective" press seems to continue to ellude those who clamour for the former without considering the later.

LOL, that's their job for win more exclusives for selling the stories. They don't give a **** either objective or subjective, if I pay some awsome amount of money, they might be willing to add '' the earth is the centre of the solar system '', that's what ''non-propaganda'' media goes normally

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Early in the day, torch supporters surrounded and shouted profanities at a small group of demonstrators calling for religious freedom and brandishing a Tibetan flag.

Police tried to prevent them from raising the flag and led the eight protesters to a van, along with a Chinese man who'd tried to snatch away their flag. They were later released and told they had been taken away for their own safety.

"It was a very dirty trick because I think it was a political decision to remove us 10 minutes before the torch got there," Christina Chan, one of the protesters told Reuters.

All reporting is selective, they have space limits, and then it is edited. This is why you must read more than one source. He is quoting the girl so he has every right to print it. The question is how would she know when the flame got there if she was taken away. You were there. Was the time the torch to get there posted? Was it on time or late? You were there. You can tell us. If she was taken away, we did the reporter interview her?

Comment: I have not seen this incident unfolding, and it's very interesting that there are a lot more silent and peaceful protest without no interruption that this reporter chose not to report. As well, it is very interesting to see how this reporter can report in such an engaged way on the exchanges among the locals, and how he got this idea from a 72year-old Chinese cab driver.

If everything was calm, there is nothing to report. You don't report on nice calm parade. You report the disruption. You don't report how many trains in China ran well that day. Only the ones that crash.

Authorities in the former British colony have drawn criticism for taking an uncharacteristically tough line including blocking several people from entering the city, among them three pro-Tibet campaigners and a Danish artist and rights activist.

No, all countries take "uncharacteristically tough line". You want to be on the world stage, learn to take a little heat.

"It is a great and solemn honor for Hong Kong, Asia's world city, to welcome back the Olympic flame on behalf of our proud nation," Hong Kong leader Donald Tsang said at the relay's start.

A march by a pro-democracy group which holds an annual commemoration for the Tiananmen square crackdown in Beijing in 1989, was shadowed every step of the way by crowds of chanting Olympics supporters who tried to slow their progress. Continued...

Elsewhere, Chinese university students waved national flags in front of protesters' banners, and shouted and sang the national anthem to try to drown out the calls for democracy.

I don't see a problem with this. Protest/counter protest happens.

In the United States, conservative and liberal members of Congress joined forces to urge a U.S. government boycott of the opening ceremony of the Games, accusing China of gross human rights violations.

Not sure what this sentence is doing there.

No one said our press was perfect.(That would be lumping all western press together.) Our point has always been you have to read different sources.

I give this article a C-. Were there any other reports of this area?

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All reporting is selective, they have space limits, and then it is edited. This is why you must read more than one source. He is quoting the girl so he has every right to print it. The question is how would she know when the flame got there if she was taken away. You were there. Was the time the torch to get there posted? Was it on time or late? You were there. You can tell us. If she was taken away, we did the reporter interview her?

If everything was calm, there is nothing to report. You don't report on nice calm parade. You report the disruption. You don't report how many trains in China ran well that day. Only the ones that crash.

No, all countries take "uncharacteristically tough line". You want to be on the world stage, learn to take a little heat.

I don't see a problem with this. Protest/counter protest happens.

Not sure what this sentence is doing there.

No one said our press was perfect.(That would be lumping all western press together.) Our point has always been you have to read different sources.

I give this article a C-. Were there any other reports of this area?

It's nice you make your viewpoints heard. The reply function did not carry through the trail, so I'd reply the

1. yes, the time schedule is all well publicized almost by the torch relay level. It was just on time.

2. Yes, space is limited, that's for sure in any reporting. If I am a responsible reporter and/or editor, I either (i) do not report it if my space does not allow me to report the fair and whole truth, or (2) choose to cut 1 of the many oneliners this article has about the many different things before and after this torch relay.

3. I am so glad you also made the point I was wondering for a while as well but somehow did not put it in the message cause I did not want people to think I read with too much skeptisism!!! How could this reporter talk to her after she was taken away to the police quarters? I thought about this... either (i) this reporter knew this girl beforehand and had her contact number and called her while she was put away (ii) he talked to somebody who knows her but was not detained and yet talked to her while she was put away and then the reporter quoted her through this third person, or (iii) this reporter was just making it up. Interesting question, and only this reporter would know the answer.

4. You might have your view, and I respect that. To me, reporting exception is fine and indeed it has been the prevailing basis of reporting. However, it's not a balanced and factual reporting when reporting the exception without pointing out the norm, the extent to which this is an exception, or even worse projecting to an ordinary reader that is exception is norm.

Regarding the crash example, if I am being a diligent reporter, I would also do some homework and reported on the frequency, casualty and/or cause of similar accident/ accidents in the region, on top of reporting the whole truth about on the current incident.

5. "...I don't see a problem with this. Protest/counter protest happens. ...." I don't see a problem either... I did not make any comments on this oneliner.

6. No, all countries take "uncharacteristically tough line". You want to be on the world stage, learn to take a little heat. - that's great. that's my point as well.. all countries do it in world stage events.

7. No one said our press was perfect.(That would be lumping all western press together.) Our point has always been you have to read different sources.

I give this article a C-. Were there any other reports of this area?

- i need to stress, as what I did in the last paragraph on my first email...my comments is not meant to go beyond this article. i agree with what you said. I do not doubt how the system works for some, and I am sure there are a lot more comprehensive articles that are easily and readily accessible via many other different sources other than from Reuters, and that people who have access to these different sources would make a sound and informed judgement by its right. The sole point I am making is an ordinary reader who reads this Reuters article is misformed, and he/she does not have a prejudice, he/she would have it, and he/she already has a prejudice, his/her prejudice would grow deeper, period, nothing more and less.

Nonetheless, my rating logic might be different from yours, and I cannot comment on how you rate. If I have to rate based on my own feeling, I would indeed rate a B-, based on a pool of past articles I have personally read.

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It's nice you make your viewpoints heard. The reply function did not carry through the trail, so I'd reply the

1. yes, the time schedule is all well publicized almost by the torch relay level. It was just on time.

2. Yes, space is limited, that's for sure in any reporting. If I am a responsible reporter and/or editor, I either (i) do not report it if my space does not allow me to report the fair and whole truth, or (2) choose to cut 1 of the many oneliners this article has about the many different things before and after this torch relay.

3. I am so glad you also made the point I was wondering for a while as well but somehow did not put it in the message cause I did not want people to think I read with too much skeptisism!!! How could this reporter talk to her after she was taken away to the police quarters? I thought about this... either (i) this reporter knew this girl beforehand and had her contact number and called her while she was put away (ii) he talked to somebody who knows her but was not detained and yet talked to her while she was put away and then the reporter quoted her through this third person, or (iii) this reporter was just making it up. Interesting question, and only this reporter would know the answer.

4. You might have your view, and I respect that. To me, reporting exception is fine and indeed it has been the prevailing basis of reporting. However, it's not a balanced and factual reporting when reporting the exception without pointing out the norm, the extent to which this is an exception, or even worse projecting to an ordinary reader that is exception is norm.

Regarding the crash example, if I am being a diligent reporter, I would also do some homework and reported on the frequency, casualty and/or cause of similar accident/ accidents in the region, on top of reporting the whole truth about on the current incident.

5. "...I don't see a problem with this. Protest/counter protest happens. ...." I don't see a problem either... I did not make any comments on this oneliner.

6. No, all countries take "uncharacteristically tough line". You want to be on the world stage, learn to take a little heat. - that's great. that's my point as well.. all countries do it in world stage events.

7. No one said our press was perfect.(That would be lumping all western press together.) Our point has always been you have to read different sources.

I give this article a C-. Were there any other reports of this area?

- i need to stress, as what I did in the last paragraph on my first email...my comments is not meant to go beyond this article. i agree with what you said. I do not doubt how the system works for some, and I am sure there are a lot more comprehensive articles that are easily and readily accessible via many other different sources other than from Reuters, and that people who have access to these different sources would make a sound and informed judgement by its right. The sole point I am making is an ordinary reader who reads this Reuters article is misformed, and he/she does not have a prejudice, he/she would have it, and he/she already has a prejudice, his/her prejudice would grow deeper, period, nothing more and less.

Nonetheless, my rating logic might be different from yours, and I cannot comment on how you rate. If I have to rate based on my own feeling, I would indeed rate a B-, based on a pool of past articles I have personally read.

As I am sayin in the previous post, I was in London Torch Relay, and saw Free Tibet compares to most of ordinary people who just enjoying the fun are far less than you see the edition of the TV, but I can only laugh and been pissed out by the great drama directed by those ugly media just love catching eyeballs as much as possible. WTF and narrow-minded confrontation.

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