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Chinese Domestic Phase 3 Ticket Sale Announced


jiejie
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The next phase of the ticket sale--available to domestic Chinese and foreign residents of China--will be May 5-June 9 on a first-come, first-serve basis. Apparently online sales will remain an option. Let's hope this time goes better than last October. Limited to 2 sessions, 3 tickets per session, which is not much. They hope to unload 1.38 million tickets, which sounds like the balance of the 1.8 million total that were supposed to move back in Phase 2 (only 450,000 out of that were sold due to faulty lottery design and execution). They have preannounced the sports that will be available, the implication being all others are not available/sold out. This might give non-PRC residents a clue as to what sports are most likely to be available at the last minute. I have a feeling that there may be a handful of tickets for each sport (maybe not every session) being held back for central box office or venue sales in late July/early August.

YES AVAIL: Athletics, Baseball, Basketball, Beach Volleyball, Boxing, C/K Flatwater, Cycling (Mtn Bike), Equestrian, Football, Handball, Hockey, Mod Pent, Rowing, Softball, Swimming (marathon only), Volleyball, Wrestling. I presume only some of the sessions within each of these will be available, and hopefully BOCOG will have a way for buyers to identify and choose only from those (but with the Chinese system, who knows???)

NOT AVAIL: Archery, Badminton, C/K Slalom, Cycling BMX, Cycling Track, Diving, Fencing, Gymnastics (Art, Rhyth, and Tramp), Judo, Sailing, Shooting, Swimming xcept marathon, Sync Swimming, Table Tennis, Taekwondo, Tennis, Triathlon, Water Polo, Weightlifting.

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Additional Details Available

BOCOG has just released the detailed list of sessions still up for grabs in the domestic Phase 3 sale that begins on May 5. This may be of interest to anybody coming for the Games who may want to gauge potential last-minute availability for sports not too popular with the Chinese. Also, the number of Bank of China outlets that will sell tickets has been cut by nearly 40%, and is now heavily skewed to Beijing-based buyers.

Athletics: 15 sessions available, nearly all sessions have all seat categories available. Only finals AT04 and AT13 sold out.

Baseball: 17 sessions available--14 prelim, both SF's and the Bronze match.

Basketball: 19 sessions available--15 W prelim, 2 M prelim, 2 W QF.

Beach Volleyball: 12 sessions available (5 prelim, 4 rnd of 16, 2 M QF's and 1 W QF)

Boxing: 9 sessions available--8 prelim and 1 QF

Canoe-Flatwater: 2 sessions available (CF01 and 02 heats)

Cycling-Mountain Bike: 2 sessions available (both).

Equestrian (Hong Kong): All 13 sessions available.

Football: All 39 sessions available in all locations including M and W gold medal matches. Most sessions have all seat categories available.

Handball: 19 sessions available including M, W semis and W brz-gold matches.

Hockey: 36 sessions available--all except M and W finals.

Mod Pent: 2 sessions at stadium (riding running only) available.

Rowing: All 8 sessions available.

Softball: 16 sessions available--all except finals

Swimming: Only 2 marathon sessions available.

Volleyball: 21 sessions available--10 W prelim, 10 M prelim, 1 M QF (unfortunately all morning prelims at BIT Gym sold out--boo :(

Wrestling: 3 qualification sesssions available (1 M, 2 W)

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I see that CoSport has shut down individual ticket sales, so overseas people are going to have to scramble to find additional tickets. Should be interesting to see what kind of availability there will be leading up to the games. Also, I wonder if the scalpers will be as prevalent as they are at other Olympics.

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Update

Well, we are less than 12 hours into the Phase 3 Chinese domestic sale, and so far the system is working. Online ordering was tediously slow but no worse than the Cosport experience. Unlike the disastrous October attempt at first-come, first-serve, this time the system had a queueing system for orders/checkout, which bottlenecked orders for anywhere from 25-50 minutes, but didn't dump them (for the most part) and once your turn in the check-out queue came up, was very quick process.

Tickets are really moving, with sellouts of what was on offer for: most Athletic sessions, all men's football in Beijing, basketball, volleyball, beach volleyball, marathon swimming (!), men's mountain biking, wrestling, and some specific sessions of other sports. What's left as of about 30 minutes ago:

Athletics--2 morning heat sessions + the 2 marathon session portions in the Stadium

Baseball--14 prelim sessions

Boxing--14 prelim sessions

Cycling Mountain--1 (womens) session

Equestrian in HK--all 13 sessions

Football--34 sessions incl all non-Beijing and the womens prelim and SF in Beijing

Handball--20 sessions (OK, I bought some!)

Hockey--35 sessions (And some of these also!)

Mod Pent--the 2 stadium sessions w/ riding-running

Rowing--6 sessions

Softball--14 prelim sessions

I'm not entirely certain that all tickets on offer were "put out on the shelf" right away. I wouldn't put it past BOCOG to wait several days and then release another batch. I was online IMMEDIATELY at the start of the sale, within 30 seconds had 2 athletic sessions and was in checkout line, when the order was "Sorry no more tickets available." I smell a rat somewhere in all this. However, I was still OK with what I did get.

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Chinese Phase 3 Tickets

Read this if you may obtain on the Secondary Market...

The Phase 3 Tickets for the Chinese domestic sale are apparently not the same as the "souvenir" ones that will be delivered to Phase 1-2 domestic purchasers, and to all Overseas purchasers via their agents. I picked up my Phase 3 tickets a couple of hours ago (you have to take your online order and ID to a designated Bank of China branch pickup location). After presenting your ID, they check the computer database for the order and then print out the tickets on blank ticket stock--from a laser printer. These tickets do not appear to have any RFID marking. They have a thermal barcode on them which will probably be scanned for authenticity. I'm sure they have some other security markers in the design. The Birds Nest figure is not used on these, it's just the red-orange-yellow cloud background with the sport pictograms in the background. I think one of these was displayed on the official web site (and other GB thread). I didn't see any other designs being issued at this bank, but perhaps there are others.

In addition to the event session, date, seat location and the usual stuff, these tickets have some small print at the bottom that identifies the RMB price and seat category, the account number of the purchaser (all domestic buyers whether online or in-person have a unique number assigned to them), the date and time the ticket was printed, and the branch code of the bank location. As these tickets are only issued in China, it isn't clear if there will be any issues if an obvious foreigner tries to use one to enter a venue, as it presents a potential question of "was this ticket resold" which is technically illegal. It is legal to sell at face value or less, but nobody is going to believe that one!. While there are foreigners here (such as myself) who are eligible to purchase in the domestic sale, it isn't a large number. Just be aware of this if you are considering an opportunity to buy these types of tickets, and you don't have a Chinese appearance. I doubt if a volunteer standard-issue ticket taker would refuse entry, as long as the ticket is genuine. However, if a ticketing security boss is hanging around a venue entry and spots you with one, they might want to ask you some interesting questions on how you acquired. It is NOT illegal to buy a ticket at higher than face value, so you won't end up in the pokey. But, it's theoretically possible to be held up for awhile with annoying questions, and risk missing or being late to your event (denial of entry is also possible but I think unlikely).

Any of my Chinese Phase 3 tickets that end up with friends or others who aren't entering venues with me, I plan to give them the ticket + a brief, signed letter in Chinese to keep in case needed--with my local phone so any nosy ticket taker or security auditor can verify with me in real-time and said friends won't get held up. This might be overkill but the Chinese have been acting pretty kooky lately, so who knows what they will come up with next. Note that this should not affect other tickets issued elsewhere, as foreigners will be expected to be carrying those.

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If it's like any of the other Olympics I've attended, they let anyone buy whatever tickets are available right before and during the games, and those tickets are the same style as the locally-bought tickets. I can't imagine they would quibble about who had what style of ticket. I do wonder, however, if the Chinese are going to crack down on scalpers at the venues. I've met some people who never buy tickets ahead of time and always get them at the games. I wouldn't necessarily rely on this tactic for Beijing.

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...I do wonder, however, if the Chinese are going to crack down on scalpers at the venues. ...

Yes. Not only crack down but actively looking for, at least in the immediate vicinity of the venues. At the most recent test events I went to, they were using undercover police to watch for scalping transactions as well as not permitting sellers to hawk their wares. There were reports of an odd foreigner (mostly expats) here or there getting nabbed buying tickets--nothing permanent happened to them and as far as I've heard, their money was returned, but they were escorted (taken) to the closest police station to "make a statement" against the scalper...and missed attending their desired events.

I'm sure tickets will be available on the secondary market at Games time, but the transactions would need to be done more discreetly and not at the venue locations. And it seems that there may not be as many loose tickets around to be picked up at the last minute in Beijing esp for premier events.

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May 6 Update

According to BOCOG ticketing, as of late afternoon May 6, ALL events have sold out except some football matches outside Beijing. Including the HK Equestrian Dressage and the Modern Pentathlon. Wow! Even I didn't expect things would move this quickly. So, unless BOCOG has some additional batches of domestic tickets up its sleeve and will release them in spurts, could this be it for domestic ticketing?

Let the counterfeiting attempts begin!

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Yes. Not only crack down but actively looking for, at least in the immediate vicinity of the venues. At the most recent test events I went to, they were using undercover police to watch for scalping transactions as well as not permitting sellers to hawk their wares. There were reports of an odd foreigner (mostly expats) here or there getting nabbed buying tickets--nothing permanent happened to them and as far as I've heard, their money was returned, but they were escorted (taken) to the closest police station to "make a statement" against the scalper...and missed attending their desired events.

Interesting. I guess it's best to arrive with your tickets in hand. I'm not really interested in the "cultural experience" of a trip to a Beijing police station.

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so if they have sold all the tickets does this mean every venue every session will be full? Look like i will have to but hockey tickets from scalpers.

should have got Jie Jie to run a games bid ticket service and buy us tickets!

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so if they have sold all the tickets does this mean every venue every session will be full? Look like i will have to but hockey tickets from scalpers.

should have got Jie Jie to run a games bid ticket service and buy us tickets!

I truly believe that nearly every session of every venue for every sport taking place in Beijing will be full or nearly so (except who knows about the VIP seats?!) As for venues outside Beijing, I expect Qingdao sailing will be full both on the chase boats and the onshore seating area. The football venues outside Beijing should be reasonably full, and the Chinese primary/secondary school student program will be used to help fill up the empties that the general public didn't buy. No idea about Hong Kong...I can't imagine a full crowd showing up for 6:30 a.m. Dressage events. :P

Heh-heh on the ticket service idea....I was definitely in an unusual and fortunate position to be able to "double-dip" from both Cosport USA and the Chinese domestic system. So I did end up with many more tickets than I can personally use and sessions that conflict time-wise. Now I'm trying to figure out what my priority sessions are and what needs to be offloaded...decisions, decisions....

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