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Why I Support A Beijing Boycott.


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I know that China is ornery in human rights resolution, I know also that it might have taken this hard step as Tibet is using the opportunity to disrupt the Olympic.

If any country was to be in China shoe what would it do to curtail this stigmatization?

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I know that China is ornery in human rights resolution, I know also that it might have taken this hard step as Tibet is using the opportunity to disrupt the Olympic.

If any country was to be in China shoe what would it do to curtail this stigmatization?

By licking the Westerners ass every single day. Be a good world factory by polluting and poisoning its own people.

Then take on all the blames for whatever the rich West want to label on it.

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If any country was to be in China shoe what would it do to curtail this stigmatization?

Simple. Allow peaceful demonstrations and talk, talk talk!

Edited by Sir Roltel
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Authonomy from Tibet<!--coloro:#008000

sizeo7span stylefontsize36ptlineheight100sizeocolor#4169E1--><span style="color:#008000

sizeo7span stylefontsize36ptlineheight100sizeocolor#4169E1"><!--/coloro-->Lhasa 2028[/color] :rolleyes::rolleyes: [/size]

Despite the imaginative use of font and colour, I think your point is somewhat lost due to the spelling and grammar mistakes. :D

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Another interesting commentary, which was published today:

IOC takes the too easy way out

The IOC is the most important committee of the world in sports. It decides which nation is allowed to host the largest and prestigious sport event in the world: the Olympic Games. The current case "Beijing" isn't the first case, which is showing how big responsibility is connected with this.

If something is going wrong, the IOC likes to pretend, that it is not concerned - but everybody else. Hein Verbruggen, the Beijing coordinator of the IOC, defended emphatically the remaining silent about the crisis in Tibet, like it is a special merit: to draw a "thick red line" between politics and sport, otherwise it would expose itself boycotts. That's pretty steep! No just, due there have been boycotts already, where the IOC did the same.

It is clear, that the IOC isn't able to take care about daily politics all the time. But the keeping out has to have limits. These limits are based on the nations unifying aspects, which the IOC likes to emphasise as idea of sports. Olympic Games shouldn't be held actually in countries, which segregate or persecute somebody. In this respect are the decisions of the IOC political anyway. No organisation with a worldwide appearance and/or claim to be worldwide isn't able to keep out of politics in blatant way. IOC takes the too easy way out.

After all is the decision, which nation is allowed to host the Games, political. The particular state interprets the decision like this and merchandise it accordingly. Isn't the IOC touched to the quick, when it has to recognise that its Games are abused in such a way? Therefore a clear guidelines neccessary, a catalogue of requirements for every single candidate, which have to be complied - connected with the possible threat, that the Games are held somewhere else. The interested cities stand in line. by WOLFGANG SCHEERER

Südwest-Presse

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By licking the Westerners ass every single day. Be a good world factory by polluting and poisoning its own people.

Then take on all the blames for whatever the rich West want to label on it.

Oh yes, blame the West for the Chinese government's failings. How original. How pathetic.

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Oh yes, blame the West for the Chinese government's failings. How original. How pathetic.

Then why would the West bother so hard then still no sign of change? lol, someone been original and pathetic almost hundred years already. Where's the strenth of Messiah?

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Wow. This has turned into quite the topic.

I've had a very busy week with a move into a new home. I'm just catching up now.

I found the interview with the German vice president of the IOC and the piece by Andrew Bolt to be very interesting reads.

As with the politicians, so with the International Olympic Committee, which awarded Beijing the 2008 Games with the excuse that this would encourage China to adopt more Western values, such as free speech.

But instead of getting China to adopt Western values, Olympic committees have tried to get Western athletes to adopt Chinese ones, demanding they sign agreements curbing their freedom to speak in Beijing.

What a good choice of hosts, eh? The IOC was deceived, or they are corrupt, or pretty bloody ignorant. Maybe all of the above. The country of China was awarded the games while spitting in the face of the the Olympic Charter. It continues to do so to this day.

The athletes can do very little under the rules of the IOC at the games, and should probably fear arrest if they leave the safety of Olympic sites.

Does this fit well in China? It's straight from the Olympic charter.

Olympism is a philosophy of life, exalting and combining in a balanced whole the qualities of body, will and mind. Blending sport with culture and education, Olympism seeks to create a way of life based on the joy of effort, the educational value of good example and respect for universal fundamental ethical principles.

I don't know about you, but my fundamental principles are not shared by the CCP.

The goal of Olympism is to place sport at the service of the harmonious development of man, with a view to promoting a peaceful society concerned with the preservation of human dignity.

Sport in Beijing will be used by the CCP to continue with their agenda, and not promoting human dignity or peace.

Boycotting the games is a personal choice. I am not supporting these games because the people of Tibet are asking for very simple rights that are basic, and I believe the games should not be held in nations that have values that are harmful. I strongly believe Beijing 2008 does not fit with the Olympic movement, and if you believe it does, you should get your head checked.

Freedom of speech is one of the most basic forms of rights that all humans should have, regardless of their location. The athletes will make a choice whether or not to go, and I completely understand. The governments have no right to tell them not to go because their future depends on it. For some, boycotting is not an option. But they should have every right to make a statement if they choose.

Guaranteed most of the post-event press conferences will not reach the Chinese audience, especially with messages for Tibet.

There is also no reason why companies and corrupt governments should profit from these games given what is going on in Tibet and the actions of the CCP. Again consumers have the ability to not support the sponsors of the Olympics as well, and actually pretty easy if you look at the official sponsors. Should they decide to pull their support, I might support them again.

My personal part of the Olympic charter just happens to be:

Any form of discrimination with regard to a country or a person on grounds of race, religion, politics, gender or otherwise is incompatible with belonging to the Olympic Movement.

There's one final (fundamental) clause:

Belonging to the Olympic Movement requires compliance with the Olympic Charter and recognition by the IOC.

Ah well, one out of two isn't bad.

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Can we take a breather from all this China and games-bashing? :angry:

This site, even if read by the IOC. is really for Games-bidding. It's past that point in Beijing's case. The Games will go on whether you, I or the Tibetans like it or not. It won't change the Chinese government's actions in the immediate future; nor will it change the IOC Charter to which the organization is neutrally committed.

I used to enjoy the build-up and anticipation of previous Games, but all this bitching and fighting is getting on my nerves. I'm purposely staying neutral.

But it's getting to be a REAL drag. I don't think you guys want me in there taking sides. :angry:

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Can we take a breather from all this China and games-bashing? I used to enjoy the build-up and anticipation of previous Games, but all this bitching and fighting is getting on my nerves.

I'd have thought you'd be in your element! :P

But seriously, this site can only reflect what's happening in the real world Baron. If avid Olympic Games Geeks are questioning the choice of China, the wisdom of the IOC, the meaning of the Olympic values etc. with some even going as far as supporting boycotts, what do you think people who only take an interest in the Olympics every four years are thinking?

I can tell you what some are thinking. My Dad, a sports fan who'll normally take some interest in the games, said a week or two ago "There's no way the Olympics should be in China. I don't think I'll bother watching any of it this time round"

If that attitude's widespread - and as we continue to hear stories about China's actions the likelyhood of it being so increases - that is worrying. We're not just seeing the image of China being damaged here but the image of the Olympic movement as a whole. Surely that's something that has to be debated on a site like this whether you like it or not.

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I'd have thought you'd be in your element! :P

But seriously, this site can only reflect what's happening in the real world Baron. If avid Olympic Games Geeks are questioning the choice of China, the wisdom of the IOC, the meaning of the Olympic values etc. with some even going as far as supporting boycotts, what do you think people who only take an interest in the Olympics every four years are thinking?

I can tell you what some are thinking. My Dad, a sports fan who'll normally take some interest in the games, said a week or two ago "There's no way the Olympics should be in China. I don't think I'll bother watching any of it this time round"

If that attitude's widespread - and as we continue to hear stories about China's actions the likelyhood of it being so increases - that is worrying. We're not just seeing the image of China being damaged here but the image of the Olympic movement as a whole. Surely that's something that has to be debated on a site like this whether you like it or not.

As I said before, the Olympic movement will go on, even after Beijing. The show is already slated for Vancouver, your Londonium, Medvedev's Sochi, and beyond. If the Olympics survived the Nazis, the massacre at Munich, it will survive China. It's not like they're actually monsters there in China. I mean, why aren't people protesting Cuba or North Korea? I mean these liberal fringes just need the cause of the season to sow their oats. Ay-ya-yay. I tend to look forward to the next season.

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Berlin, and even Munich were in a different age. The massacre in Mexico City 10 days before the Games in '68, for example, would be unimaginably damaging if it happened in 2008 but it wasn't forty years ago; its impact was minimal. Things can't remain hidden or be twisted in quite the way they used to be.

The Olympic movement will of course go on, but will the "brand" (for want of a better word) be tarnished? Will it be up to London and Vancouver to "save" the Games, or will, as had always been hoped but is looking less and less likely, these cities be saying to themselves "How the hell do we better that?"

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As I said before, the Olympic movement will go on, even after Beijing. The show is already slated for Vancouver, your Londonium, Medvedev's Sochi, and beyond. If the Olympics survived the Nazis, the massacre at Munich, it will survive China. It's not like they're actually monsters there in China. I mean, why aren't people protesting Cuba or North Korea? I mean these liberal fringes just need the cause of the season to sow their oats. Ay-ya-yay. I tend to look forward to the next season.

I so look forward to Vancouver and London. And Rio or Tokyo or Chicago 2016 because it will return to a normallacy of what the Olympics are all about.

I am in the middle of San Francisco right now and it is like WTF - don't these people realize that the torch passing through the one and only place that it is chosen to host it in North America realize this is an honor? Yes, I am totally against what is going on in Tibet but if these protesters were actually that concerned about it wouldn't they be protesting DAILY at the Chinese Consulate up on Geary Street? As it is, they are nothing but attention whores.

Why did the torch not go through Los Angeles? My dad even asked me back in Illinois that on the phone this morning.

Edited by LA84
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The Olympic movement will of course go on, but will the "brand" (for want of a better word) be tarnished? Will it be up to London and Vancouver to "save" the Games, or will, as had always been hoped but is looking less and less likely, these cities be saying to themselves "How the hell do we better that?"

Yes. Once again London will be one of the two (Los Angeles the other) to save the games and Vancouver to give the prelude to it.

The Canadians know how to host a games, I'm telling you! Montreal was spectacular as was Calgary!

And the games will go on. .

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Why did the torch not go through Los Angeles?

Because they did not consult with us. :) Right, LA84?

Of course the other reason is LA has a much larger Koreatown down there. And at least the Chinatown here is larger than SF's Japantown -- altho of course, now, it will only come to a few blocks within SF's Chinatown.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Then why would the West bother so hard then still no sign of change? lol, someone been original and pathetic almost hundred years already. Where's the strenth of Messiah?

:lol::lol::lol:

My apologies. I really shouldn't laugh. It's just that suggesting Western governments are really trying to bring about change in China is the funniest thing I've heard all day.

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:lol::lol::lol:

My apologies. I really shouldn't laugh. It's just that suggesting Western governments are really trying to bring about change in China is the funniest thing I've heard all day.

Yes, but they have been doing it almost 50 years since the PRC found, especially some of your ''great grandfathers''. Check out the 'activities in China' in Wiki by yourself. And thanks for your apology anyway. :lol:

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I'd have thought you'd be in your element! :P

But seriously, this site can only reflect what's happening in the real world Baron. If avid Olympic Games Geeks are questioning the choice of China, the wisdom of the IOC, the meaning of the Olympic values etc. with some even going as far as supporting boycotts, what do you think people who only take an interest in the Olympics every four years are thinking?

I can tell you what some are thinking. My Dad, a sports fan who'll normally take some interest in the games, said a week or two ago "There's no way the Olympics should be in China. I don't think I'll bother watching any of it this time round"

If that attitude's widespread - and as we continue to hear stories about China's actions the likelyhood of it being so increases - that is worrying. We're not just seeing the image of China being damaged here but the image of the Olympic movement as a whole. Surely that's something that has to be debated on a site like this whether you like it or not.

We have witnessed years and years of anti-democratic actions by the CCP, brutal acts of violence towards those that dissent, and they interfere negatively in global affairs. They are against everything that the Olympics stand for. It was a mistake to award the games to Beijing prior to action on human rights. It will be a mistake to celebrate the CCP.

Olympic sport never trumps human rights, and these games were more about the hope of human rights than the sport when they were awarded.

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And lets be honest, the Beijing games weren't attributed on technical merit...

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