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daniel anderson400

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Posts posted by daniel anderson400

  1. On 2/13/2018 at 3:19 PM, Quaker2001 said:

    There was very literally nothing else going on last night.  The only 3 events that that took place last night before 2am ET were the curling mixed doubles bronze medal match, men's and women's halfpipe, plus alpine skiing.  NBC had no place else to go which is why NBCSN was in replays all last night.  That was as much live coverage as perhaps we've ever seen in a Winter Olympics primetime.  I can't find too many faults in how they handled that.  Last night was them at their best, not a step back.  Live and to the point.  Very little filler (which is what a long run of unfamiliar athletes would be).  Loving this timezone for that reason.

    Last night was even busier, since NBC had the skiing, while NBCSN had the hockey game at the same time.

  2. 7 hours ago, A-Money1983 said:

    So far, NBC has shown to be well-adjusted in its Olympic coverage.  That said, tonight seemed to be a step back.

    I long wanted to see them donmore live coverage, but it seemed to drag.  

    Its not so much showing the competition.  They did great going live with Chloe Kim and Ted Ligety, but they should’ve found something else to show during a ski slope delay, or long run of unfamiliar athletes.

    I long advocated for the latter, but I’m not so sure it translated well on prime time network TV.

     

    I've long advocated for NBC to do what they do on the NFL and other major sports and show events in their entirety.

  3. 8 hours ago, Quaker2001 said:

    There's not a ton I would ask them to do differently this time around.  NBC is primarily live in primetime and NBCSN is specifically set up to compliment them.  So that's the way it should be.  And kudos to them for having NBCSN up and running all day so they'll show many of the events on tape that were missed overnight.  The big question I have is the online coverage.. will I be able to watch a replay of an event as soon as it's over or will that be held back for awhile?  I hope it's the former.  If that's the case, than everything else is gravy.  And then I can forgive NBC for an almost complete lack of live curling (they're showing a grand total of 3 games live on TV the entire Olympics and not a single one between the day of the opening ceremony and the women's gold medal game on the last day).

    As to your first point.. that's exactly what they should do.  Since it was referenced earlier, the mistake that NBC made in 1988 in Seoul was that they went live for the sake of going live.  They'd go to a basketball game or a water polo match just because that's what was going on at the time rather than showing track & field or swimming or something else that would appeal more to that audience.  The equivalent now would be if the NBC primetime show, instead of going to that traditional prime-time filler, went to coverage of a curling match.  They'll lose viewers a lot more quickly doing than than showing events on tape.

    I have to agree, especially  about Seoul. Your'e right, the biggest mistake that NBC made was they went live for the sake of going live, and you can't do that. You have to develop storylines. I remember when Greg Louganis was going for a gold medal in diving in the 88 games, and NBC had a split screen of the U.S.-Canada basketball game at the same time.  That made me angry, especially since NBC could have simply followed the bigger storyline( Louganis for a gold medal after hitting his head in a earlier round.) I think that switching around from sport to sport is distracting to most viewers.

  4. 22 hours ago, Durban Sandshark said:

    That's a good thing you did there as we await the big--and official--NBC Olympics 2018 TV schedule. Weren't the links were dropped because of the need to update them in accommodating the likes of Olympic Ice. I also noticed that the Sweden-Japan women's hockey game, the very first hockey game in Pyeongchang, isn't going to be televised. So much for showing everything as I thought NBC would. Maybe NBC eventually will that under either CNBC or USA Network, even if it's tape delayed. I mean, it's basically got all the mixed doubles curling.

    Full footage from the ZDF and ARD joint press conference back in December 12 in Berlin at the Radisson Blu Hotel Berlin Mitte die PK announcing again their joint coverage in free-to-air German TV as the two public TV broadcasters continue on their Olympic and Paralympic broadcast tradition after when it was widely and publicly thought it was an end of an era when they couldn't come to terms with Eurosport and Discovery Networks Deutschland: 

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_AA46PpP4KQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qN_y4JC54j0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQdMLCBDrac

    I'll provide more about both ZDF and ARD next time. Both will alternate again as usual starting with February 9 with ARD doing the Opening Ceremony (it is running the February 8 programming like the men's normal hill ski jumping) and its programming will start somewhere between 1:15-1:30 CET to 17.  

    In any case, this is undoubtably, when you combine ZDF's and ARD's TV hours with Eurosport 1's, Eurosport 2's, and TLC's, that this is the biggest coverage in German Winter Olympic TV history ever with the Eurosports and TLC holding some exclusivity on select sports like snowboarding, ice hockey, and figure skating. We can only imagine what it'll be like when they all make its Summer Olympics debut--finally hitting the 1000s in hours for Germany. We now know the breakdown of the Discovery Germany hours breakdown from the latter set: it's over 550 hours there with free-to-airs Eurosport 1 and TLC having 250 and 200 hours, respectively, with pay-TV channel Eurosport 2 carrying 100 hours. It too will start more like midnight with live competition and will carry three studios (in Pyeongchang for live sports and daily highlights, one in Munich for the 2-hour nighttime show, and at the Deutschland Haus):

    https://www.presseportal.de/pm/6617/3841529

    https://www.infosat.de/digital-tv/olympische-winterspiele-2018-das-eurosport-programm-im-berblick

    We already know about Matthias Bielek, Martin Schmitt , Birgit Nössing, Sven Hannawald, Anni Friesinger, Marco Schreyl, Andre Lange, Fabien Hambuchen, Julia Kleine,  Michael Greis, and Frank Wörndl being part of the Eurosport Germany portion of the sportscasting team. Now the Eurosport Germany completes the sportscasting list this week with the additions of World Cup team sledder and former world junior champ Julian von Schleinitz and Simon Südelin, reporter Marcel Klein, and commentator Ron Ringguth at the luge/skeleton competitions from the Alpensia Sliding Center. Stella Heiß, Curling World Champion of 2010, will expand the sport's commentary team with Uli Kapp and Christopher Bartsch. For the Olympic hockey tournament in Pyeongchang this is completed Patrick Ehelechner and Andreas Renz to capture the emotions and scenes at the rink. Joining Nossing in the studio will be Oliver Sequenz and Simón Albers. All three will go live with in "Your Olympia Live" every day from 0:30-15:00 live on Eurosport 1 and TLC on the air and serve for the German audience the first point of contact between the competitions. Plus, it'll have a doping-expert and sports and politics reporter in Benjamin Best. 

    Because between the live transmissions several times daily in the Olympia studio is switched, where the trio summarizes the most exciting scenes, current Olympia news and the highlights of the day. 00:30 to 06:00 o'clock in the night track is Oliver sequence in use, the "Morning Man" from 06:00 to 11:00 clock is Simón Albers while Birgit Nössing for the German audience from 11:00 to 15 : 30 o'clock until the end of the Olympic live day is on the air.

    https://www.eurosport.de/olympia/pyeongchang/2018/eurosport-komplettiert-experten-team-fur-olympia-in-pyeongchang-2018_sto6478495/story.shtml

    Max Zielke is going to be the Twenty18 show's social media expert, and Fabien Hambuchen and Sascha Kalupke report from the German Haus in Pyeongchang:

    https://www.eurosport.de/olympia/pyeongchang/2018/marco-schreyl-und-julia-kleine-moderieren-zwanzig18-die-olympia-show-bei-eurosport-und-tlc_sto6441698/story.shtml

    Back to Rogers SportsNet's Pyeongchang 2018 Olympic TV programming schedule (all times Canada/US/Mexico CT):

    February 16

    5-8AM  Men's Curling: Olympic Games Morning---SportsNet, SportsNet Ontario, SportsNet Pacific, SportsNet West, SportsNet East

    5-8:30AM Women's Skeleton/Men's Ski Jumping: Olympic Games Morning--SportsNet ONE

    3-6PM   Men's and Women's Curling--SportsNet, SportsNet Ontario, SportsNet Pacific, SportsNet West, SportsNet East

    6PM-12AM Women's Curling, Women's Alpine Skiing, Women's Freestyle Skiing, Men's Curling: Olympic Games Primetime--SportsNet, SportsNet Ontario, SportsNet Pacific, SportsNet West, SportsNet East

    10PM-12AM Women's Freestyle Skiing: Olympic Games Primetime--SportsNet ONE

    February 17

    3:30-8:30AM Women's Cross Country Skiing/Women's Curling: Olympic Games Morning---SportsNet, SportsNet Ontario, SportsNet West, SportsNet Pacific, SportsNet East

    3:30-8:30AM Women's Cross Country Skiing/Women's Biathlon: Olympic Games Morning--SportsNet ONE

    10PM-1AM    Men's Alpine Skiing: Olympic Games Primetime--SportsNet, SportsNet Ontario, SportsNet Pacific, SportsNet West, SportsNet East

    February 18

    5-8:30AM  Men's and Women's Speed Skating: Olympic Games Morning--SportsNet, SportsNet Ontario, SportsNet Pacific, SportsNet West, SportsNet East

    5-8:30AM  Men's Curling: Olympic Games Morning--SportsNet ONE

    9:30PM-4:30AM Figure Skating (Ice Dance Short Program) and Men's Curling: Olympic Games Primetime--SportsNet, SportsNet Ontario, SportsNet West, SportsNet Pacific, SportsNet East      

    Wondering now who will co-host the CBC's broadcast of both the Opening and Closing Ceremonies with Scott Russell now that Peter Mansbridge has retired and Ron McLean won't be available this time? Like to see Andi Petrillo do it.  

    Czech Radio/Ceska Rohzlas presents for the first time an all sports radio station on DAB, Internet download, and on the iRadio mobile app from 9 to 25 February called Radiozurnal Olympic Special, it will be broadcast 24 hours a day. Live and Direct broadcasts of the Czech team's ice hockey matches, interviews with athletes, along with insights and glimpses of the backstage of the games will act as the main attraction along with other Czech Team's competitions and news direct from Brno, Czech Republic studios with the Brno Olympic Festival going on. Olympic News will still appear on regular Czech Radio:

    https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=cs&u=http://www.rozhlas.cz/radiozurnal/olympijskyrok/_zprava/za-mesic-zacinaji-olympijske-hry-cesky-rozhlas-chysta-specialni-vysilani--1779833&prev=search

    25 years after the Czech and Slovak breakup, Slovakia's RTVS announces it will handle a team of 100 people responsible for the broadcast and news of the upcoming Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics with a third of them on location in Pyeongchang, South Korea. On Slovakian TV, RTVS will present 260 hours for Slovakian viewers on both of its TV channels, Jednotka and Dvojka, with the Jednotka handling both ceremonies, Team Slovakia hockey matches, and other "attractive" hockey games up to the gold medal games. Dvojka will present a daily nighttime summary program at 20:00 Slovakia time loosely translated into English as Summaries of the Finished Olympic Hour Hour Studio 2018 as quickie hourly Olympic news is provided. The two channels will also be present to record and transmit from all 13 Pyeongchang's sports venues.

    On the radio side, RTVS will offer sports greater enhanced coverage overall and time shifting that will help out in the cases of biathlon competitions when Slovakians are starting their days, particularly when a Slovakian is in serious contention:

    http://www.teraz.sk/sport/rtvs-dianiu-na-olympiade-prisposobi/303626-clanok.html

    The BBC's Pyeongchang 2018 TV listing. Bare bones for the most part with no specifics of what's going on during these programming blocks save for the ceremonies and the preview that BBC2 has and holds the bulk of the regular TV coverage. As so typically the case with the BBC channels and the Olympics, BBC2 will start off for several hours then off for some hours as BBC1 takes over before reverting to BBC2 to complete the stretch, though it does return for the 1-2-hour The Games Today for news/highlights while BBC Red Button goes on nonstop. BBC1 and BBC Red Button does comes back for live overnight/early morning action--BBC Red Button also does replays for several hours up to 0:00. Good that BBC4 is also involved with the 1-hour Olympics Extra. All starts early February 6 at 0:00-2:00 GMT on the Red Button because of the mixed doubles curling that Team GB is involved in:  

    http://www.bbc.com/sport/winter-olympics/42735569

    Eurosport Poland, the exclusive Polish Olympic Committee media partner, announces its sportscasters/experts and its coverage plans this week. Tomasz Sikora, former biathlete who silver in Turin and a 3x World Champion medalist, former ski jumper and Maciej's older brother Jakub Kot, Ewa Bilan-Stoch (Kamil Stoch's wife and her materials will focus, among others on history or local customs in South Korea), Michael Korościel, YouTubers Krzysztof Gonciarz and Kasia Męcińska, and special digital reporter based in Pyeongchang Łukasz Przybyłowicz all headline the announcement in Warsaw with an eye to attract younger Olympic consumers. But that's not all! Ski jumping and biathlon will highlight the coverage as they're big in Poland with Tomasz Jaroński and Krzysztof Wyrzykowski and ski jumping specialists Igor Błachut and Marek Rudziński. Also Kacper Merk will work in Pyeongchang, who, apart from commenting on cross-country skiing, will act as one of the reporters. At least a dozen people from Polish Eurosport head over there with several dozen stationed in both Warsaw and Paris. As a reminder, Eurosport 1's schedule will adapt and devote largely to Polish athletes, their starts, and the popular Polish winter sports ski jumping and biathlon with analysis and summaries. Eurosport 2 Poland will other popular sports like hockey:
    http://www.wirtualnemedia.pl/artykul/zimowa-olimpiada-pjongczang-w-eurosporcie-plan-transmisji#
    http://eurosport.interia.pl/raporty/raport-pjongczang-2018/aktualnosci/news-gwiazdy-ekspertami-eurosportu-podczas-zimowych-igrzysk-olimp,nId,2509009#utm_source=paste&utm_medium=paste&utm_campaign=chrome

    TVP Polska announces this week it will transmit 200 hours, an increase of 70 hours from Sochi 2014, next 50 hours are Olympic-themed studies, summaries, and additional programs. Coverage starts February 8 before the Opening Ceremony for the first time because of the popularity of the ski jumping with the men's ski jumping normal hill qualification and competitions (two individual and one team) in men's rivalry, but also all training series. TVP will show and analyze them 24 hours a day. Adam Malysz stars on the 35-person TVP sportscasting team as the ski jumping analyst joining the duo of Przemysław Babiarz - Włodzimierz Szaranowicz; Piotr Sobczyński does figure skating and biathlon; Jarosław Idzi handles cross-country skiing and biathlon; Piotr Dębowski will comment on speed skating. The trio of Dariusz Szpakowski, Mariusz Czerkawski and Jacek Laskowski comment on ice hockey; and Sebastian Szczęsny tackles ski jumping and alpine skiing. Piotr Meissner will comment on cross-country skiing with Idzi. The TVP Olympic studio will be hosted by Maciej Kurzajewski, while the reporters are Justyna Szubert-Kotomska, Aleksandra Rajewska, and Filip Czyszanowski.

    TVP1 and TVP2 will carry Pyeongchang 2018 Olympic coverage very much simultaneously and will be present whenever there's Polish representation, " show the opening of the games, closing, the most important events and behind the scenes - nothing escapes our viewers", says Marek Szkolnikowski. Their daily broadcasting start for live competitions will take place after midnight and lasting until 4pm. Afterwards, it's the programming "Hello, it's PjongCzang" (TVP1 around 16.20), "Abbreviation of events" (TVP1, about 16:30) and "Day at the Olympics", in which the most important moments of the day will be shown (TVP1 right before Messages at 19.30). Both ceremonies will be jointly commentated by Szaranowicz, Babiarz and Sobczyński. TVP's presence on the digital side sport.tvp.pl and in the mobile application TVP Sport will be shown after several hours of transmission per day. There is also a special team for Pyeongchang that will create content dedicated to Facebook users, Twitter and sport.tvp.pl.
    http://www.wirtualnemedia.pl/artykul/zimowe-igrzyska-olimpijskie-w-tvp-plan-transmisji-ekspertem-adam-malysz

    TVP's Pyeongchang 2018 promo highlights Poland's greatest Winter Olympic moments from Sochi 2014 including Kamil Stoch, Justyna Kowalczyk, Zbigniew Bródka, and the speed skating teams of silver medalists Katarzyna Bachleda-Curuś, Natalia Czerwonka, Luiza Złotkowska, Katarzyna Woźniak (Women's team pursuit) and bronze medalists Zbigniew Bródka, Konrad Niedźwiedzki, and Jan Szymański (Men's team pursuit) with the TVP Polska commentary:

    Another skiier joining the broadcasting ranks for this Olympics after injuries halted her career is Julia Mancuso. The free spirit retired in style yesterday in Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy in a Wonder Woman getup on her skiing final run yesterday and joins NBC as a reporter and for the Olympic Zone:

    http://olympics.nbcsports.com/2018/01/19/julia-mancuso-retires-alpine-skiing/

    http://www.espn.com/olympics/skiing/story/_/id/22149539/julia-mancuso-retire-world-cup-downhill-racing-cortina

    Also I hope NBC improves greatly on the upcoming Olympic media guide...

    Can't and shouldn't forget about the print side of things. Lately, I've seen magazines as we approach closer to the next Winter Olympic Games with skiier Mikeala Schifferin (Outside Magazine), hockey player Hilary Knight (Red Bulletin) on covers. There's also an SI article on Lindsay Vonn looking into Pyeongchang.

     

     

     

     

     

    I see a bit of a problem with Sportsnet having skiing on the 17th- they have the Bruins-Canucks game at 10.

  5. On 1/10/2018 at 6:37 PM, Durban Sandshark said:

    Yesterday's CBC Sports press release does say Ron MacLean and Don Cherry will be involved with special Coach's Corner editions during select Olympics matches if the Hockey Night In Canada broadcast schedule allows them such, namely Canada men's and women's hockey matches in all likelihood. Glad to see Kate Beirness getting some CBC Olympic hockey hosting as well as Cassie Campbell-Pascal serving as analyst. Cassie really knows her stuff and is really good as the first female in-game HNIC analyst for Rogers SportsNet--it's why she's among the The Hockey News' 100 People Of Power And Influence in Hockey at #88. We don't know exactly what TSN and Rogers SportNet will show and for how many hours each in total Fuller events to be sure. But we can safely presume with in association with the CBC, Canadians will see everything short of the practices during the English-language TV side. Did expect Nabil Karim, Brad Fay, and Arash Madani to be back repping for their respective cable sports networks in TSN and Rogers, but it's nice to see them have other on-air studio talent back in Toronto joining them. So this seems more like to me extended programming hours coming for them. Obviously TSN doesn't need all of its channels to cover them; just no more than two of them--perhaps TSN and TSN2. We also can safely assume Pyeongchang 2018 will become a 4KTV presentation with this obviously being a major project.   

    The RAI 2 and RAI Sport+ HD Pyeongchang 2018 Olympic TV schedule just arrived a few hours ago for Italy (and San Marino) viewers with the announcement at CONI's headquarters in Rome as the free-to-air state broadcasters makes its Winter Olympic broadcasting return in 8 years. As expected with both being a part of it getting the rights it's a combined total of over 110 hours, meeting the minimum of TV hours for the Winter Olympics. RAI 2 starts with the live Opening Ceremony at 11:55 on February 9 and live competition at 1:45am with one extended morning block on some days and two shorter ones on others RAI Sport+ HD arriving with its portion the next day and usually coming, until the last Winter Olympic weekend, in 3-4-hour late morning/mid-afternoon blocks Italy time somewhere between 11-3pm. Emphasis at RAI of course will focus on Team Italia Azzurri like Arianna Fontana, Carolina Kostner, Dominik Paris, Sofia Goggia, Federico Pellegrino, Dorothea Wierer, and Fedrica Brignone but will touch worthy Olympic-related topics like the North-South Korea diplomatic relations and tensions including the usual commentaries, summaries, special services, news, hopes, sacrifices, and emotions.  An early evening 30-45 minute daily magazine show will come on RAI 2 somewhere between 18:45-19:35. Sportface.it can be followed constantly with all the pieces, the results, the Italians involved in the Olympic competitions, the medal stand updated in real time, news, and videos. Thought Italy would compete early for curling in the mixed doubles so that RAI may come in early but actually isn't.

    Leading the RAI team following the Olympics, with 10 commentators and 6 analysts, will be Ivana Vaccari, who will also be responsible for conducting the Games alternating with Amedeo Goria, Sabrina Gandolfi, and Luca Di Bella all back in RAI's Milan studios following the action. Among the RAI reporters are Elisabetta Caporale, Stefano Curone, Davide Novelli, and Stefano Rizzato. Eurosport Italia's team will be composed of Giorgio Rocca, three Olympic cross-country skiers in Fulvio Valbusa, Gabriella Paruzzi and Marco Albarello, and bronze medal alpine skiier Karen Putzer:

    https://www.sportface.it/olimpiadi-invernali-pyeongchang-2018/olimpiadi-pyeongchang-2018-rai-tutte-dirette-10-25-febbraio/327479

    https://www.sportface.it/in-evidenza/olimpiadi-pyeongchang-rai-110-ore-programmazione/327462

    http://mondiali.net/66532-olimpiadi-invernali-pyeongchang-2018-la-programmazione-tv-su-rai-ed-eurosport/

    http://www.rtl.it/notizie/articoli/olimpiadi-invernali-2018-la-rai-presenta-il-palinsesto/

    BROADCASTING & CABLE: NBC SPORTS REGIONAL NETWORKS SEND TALENT TO 2018 PYEONGCHANG 2018 OLYMPICS

    Korea Telecom (KT) supplies the scenic 390-people village of Euiyaji that's 15 minutes from Pyeongchang with the 5G wiring treatment. Wish we Americans have something like this nationwide very soon. Also details the plans 5G technology will be involved nearby in Pyeongchang like Time Slice:

    http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/article.aspx?aid=3042343

    So does this report straight from the official Pyeongchang 2018 website from Yonhap News about the upcoming 5G and ICT innovations KT brings forth:

    https://www.pyeongchang2018.com/en/news/pyeongchang-g-30-s-korean-firms-to-promote-cutting-edge-ict-tech-at-pyeongchang-olympics

    Eurosport Sweden makes public its Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic sportscasting team, Sweden's biggest Olympic TV squad ever in history at 120, with Karen Frick, Peter Forsberg, Anja Parson, Magdelena Forsberg, Jonas Karlsson, Per Elofsson, Kim Martin, Hakan Loob, Peter Ekwall, Paul Ahlgren, Anders Sodergren, Jessica Almanas, Jesper Noren, Sara Karlsson, Maria Danielsson, and Seb Kraupp headlining to name several of them that now includes a digital-only team. Live coverage starts at 1am Sweden time on Kanal 5, the Swedish Olympic TV home and where the top events and Swedish medal hopes head towards, and onwards to 16:00 (4pm) with Jonas Karlsson leading Eurosport's daytime studio segment and opening at 6am every day to guide viewers through Swedish medal prospects and classical sports moments. Between 16-19:00, those who missed the competitions during the day has the chance to update when the main highlights and moments are shown in packaged form. Then at 19:00 it's Jessica's and Anja's OS-magazine show. Kanal 9 compliments things when programming events clash with Kanal 5's, which surely will happen often during the course of the Winter Olympics. Eurosport 1 in Sweden is the home of nothing but hockey with Eurosport 2 takes on an international perspective. You'll notice that some sports like short track, snowboarding, and the bobsled/luge/skeleton have only commentators for Kanal 5/Eurosport/Kanal 9: 

    http://www.mynewsdesk.com/se/discovery-networks-sweden-ab/pressreleases/eurosports-os-trupp-redo-foer-pyeongchang-2364930

    As the most-watched sports TV network in Poland among the 16-49 age demo with an increase in viewership of somewhere between 21-24%, Eurosport's got major plans for its Polish language Winter Olympics intended for improved and better engagement and that includes 4D replays and augmented realities, 150-person staff with nearly 60 decorated Polish athletes as expert commentators, and Polish Olympic fan zones for the first time:

    http://www.polskatimes.pl/sport/a/eurosport-1-na-czele-kanalow-sportowych-w-2017-roku,12827415/

    NBC OLYMPICS ANNOUNCES ITS PYEONGCHANG 2018 OLYMPIC HOCKEY COMMENTARY TEAM

    Did expectedly get the regular pieces of NHL On NBC team like Albert, Milbury, McGuire, and Roenick over in Pyeongchang. AJ Mleczko is the women's returnee. Surprising to find TSN's Tessa Bonhomme and Gord Miller joining the southern behemoth enemy. Both really should be at CBC Olympics and was stunned to see them not on the roster yesterday--maybe this is a consequence of that massive Rogers NHL Canadian TV deal. Too bad Doc Emrick surprisingly decides to stay at home this time with the NHL games surrounded by the Winter Olympics. Perhaps wouldn't do the Olympic hockey with longtime partner Eddie Olczyk continuing his cancer treatment. Hoping Johnny Walton will be as good in NBC Olympic women's hockey like he is with his Washington Capitals radio play-by-play.

    Press release of the latest Eurosport Spain's Road To Pyeongchang episode centers on Paralympic champion alpine skiier Jon Sanatacana with a 2-part video interview of Spanish biathlete Victoria Padial accompanying this piece:

    https://www.eurosport.es/juegos-olimpicos/pyeongchang/2018/rumbo-a-pyeongchang-la-epica-historia-del-esquiador-alpino-jon-santacana_sto6469056/story.shtml

     

    I kind of figured that Ron MacLean and Don Cherry would be involved in the hockey coverage, but it makes sense for Kate Beirness to be hosting rather than Ron MacLean. That way, he doesn't miss any of the studio work on HNIC. The NHL conflicts really on apply with the late games out west, like Calgary, Vancouver, Edmonton, etc and even then, Rogers has enough channels for both NHL and Olympics.

  6. On 9/29/2017 at 4:02 PM, Durban Sandshark said:

    SportsNet also has the Toronto Maple Leafs regional rights too including on SportsNet Fan 590 radio that it also shares with TSN 1050 Toronto. TSN/RDS holds the regional rights towards the Maple Leafs, Senators, Jets, and the Canadiens with RDS holding the exclusive French rights towards the Habs (Canadiens for the unitiated) and Sens. But their resources won't be stretched thin like Rogers will be because of the latter's very massive national Canadian NHL TV contract with TVA Sports on the French side that Bell Media isn't involved. Contract lasts until 2026. Furthermore there's the TSN multichannel advantage, which it can use to show Winter Olympic events like it did acting as the bulk than SportsNet with Rio 2016 but not as much sports. Maple Leaf games will be TSN4, Sens are on TSN5, the Jets will be at TSN3, and the Canadiens will appear on TSN2. Issue is, where exactly the TSN channels will the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics from the TSN front will be shown? Surely TSN proper will but maybe with TSN2/3 for supplemental events with likely some simulcasting from the others until Sportscentre and NHL regional action. Or the sports. With Rogers SportsNet, I seriously think there will be a fusion with the CBC hockey personnel with the CBC acting as the bulk. Doubt highly we'll see some TSN hockey sportscasters involved. One can only imagine if the Vancouver Grizzlies were still existing and also showed all their games on Rogers SportsNet Pacific and West how that would affect things. As for as that Hockey Day in Canada coming on Saturday February 18, that early game Winnipeg at Montreal in the afternoon has to go to City TV with CBC/Radio-Canada and Rogers SportsNet too focused on live Pyeongchang 2018 coverage segments up to the early afternoon. In many cases. that hockey will be immediately afterwards Hockey Night in Canada and the regional/nationally televised games.

    Plus, there's also the additional fact that Rogers SportsNet also has half of the Toronto Raptors 82-game TV schedule it's committed to as well with four games during the Pyeongchang span, all on SportsNet One. TSN in comparison will only have two Raptors games at that month because their greater broadcasting priority of course will be with Pyeongchang 2018 and of the regional NHL team rights (ditto on the radio with TSN 1050 Toronto) with those multiple channels. Very safe to say that Rogers SportsNet will showcase men's and women's Olympic hockey as its anchor because of the NHL contract and of the hockey resources it currently hold with plenty of pre- and post-game analysis with the CBC having all the games, not just the Team Canada and the medal round ones of course. I am sure there will be ceremony simulcasting from Rogers SportsNet and TSN/RDS and possible replays. We'll touch upon the RDS French side, where things aren't as vast even with three channels--and its hockey personnel could get stretched out even more so. The TVA Sports hockey sportscasting guys MIGHT (emphasis on that word) get involved in South Korea because of the NHL rights, but I don't think so because there's no Olympics broadcasting involved with them.

    With the Olympics, be it Summer or Winter, it unquestionably will reach Millenials to bring forth more ad revenue for 17 days than MTV reaps in a year. Millenials are where it's at to get them into Olympic fever, and they've succeeded during Rio 2016. Snapchat and Buzzfeed will help them even further to reach the $10 billion ad revenue goal for NBCU as it highly picks up steam when we get closer for February:

    http://www.adweek.com/tv-video/ad-sales-for-nbcs-coverage-of-the-winter-olympics-are-starting-to-pick-up/

    The one conflict that could be interesting is when the gold medal men's hockey game is at the same time(or overlapping it seems) with the NHL game Edmonton @ Los Angeles, if Canada happens to be playing that game, then i could see CBC airing the gold medal game with one of the SportsNet channels airing the Oilers/Kings game.

  7. On 9/29/2017 at 4:02 PM, Durban Sandshark said:

    SportsNet also has the Toronto Maple Leafs regional rights too including on SportsNet Fan 590 radio that it also shares with TSN 1050 Toronto. TSN/RDS holds the regional rights towards the Maple Leafs, Senators, Jets, and the Canadiens with RDS holding the exclusive French rights towards the Habs (Canadiens for the unitiated) and Sens. But their resources won't be stretched thin like Rogers will be because of the latter's very massive national Canadian NHL TV contract with TVA Sports on the French side that Bell Media isn't involved. Contract lasts until 2026. Furthermore there's the TSN multichannel advantage, which it can use to show Winter Olympic events like it did acting as the bulk than SportsNet with Rio 2016 but not as much sports. Maple Leaf games will be TSN4, Sens are on TSN5, the Jets will be at TSN3, and the Canadiens will appear on TSN2. Issue is, where exactly the TSN channels will the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics from the TSN front will be shown? Surely TSN proper will but maybe with TSN2/3 for supplemental events with likely some simulcasting from the others until Sportscentre and NHL regional action. Or the sports. With Rogers SportsNet, I seriously think there will be a fusion with the CBC hockey personnel with the CBC acting as the bulk. Doubt highly we'll see some TSN hockey sportscasters involved. One can only imagine if the Vancouver Grizzlies were still existing and also showed all their games on Rogers SportsNet Pacific and West how that would affect things. As for as that Hockey Day in Canada coming on Saturday February 18, that early game Winnipeg at Montreal in the afternoon has to go to City TV with CBC/Radio-Canada and Rogers SportsNet too focused on live Pyeongchang 2018 coverage segments up to the early afternoon. In many cases. that hockey will be immediately afterwards Hockey Night in Canada and the regional/nationally televised games.

    Plus, there's also the additional fact that Rogers SportsNet also has half of the Toronto Raptors 82-game TV schedule it's committed to as well with four games during the Pyeongchang span, all on SportsNet One. TSN in comparison will only have two Raptors games at that month because their greater broadcasting priority of course will be with Pyeongchang 2018 and of the regional NHL team rights (ditto on the radio with TSN 1050 Toronto) with those multiple channels. Very safe to say that Rogers SportsNet will showcase men's and women's Olympic hockey as its anchor because of the NHL contract and of the hockey resources it currently hold with plenty of pre- and post-game analysis with the CBC having all the games, not just the Team Canada and the medal round ones of course. I am sure there will be ceremony simulcasting from Rogers SportsNet and TSN/RDS and possible replays. We'll touch upon the RDS French side, where things aren't as vast even with three channels--and its hockey personnel could get stretched out even more so. The TVA Sports hockey sportscasting guys MIGHT (emphasis on that word) get involved in South Korea because of the NHL rights, but I don't think so because there's no Olympics broadcasting involved with them.

    With the Olympics, be it Summer or Winter, it unquestionably will reach Millenials to bring forth more ad revenue for 17 days than MTV reaps in a year. Millenials are where it's at to get them into Olympic fever, and they've succeeded during Rio 2016. Snapchat and Buzzfeed will help them even further to reach the $10 billion ad revenue goal for NBCU as it highly picks up steam when we get closer for February:

    http://www.adweek.com/tv-video/ad-sales-for-nbcs-coverage-of-the-winter-olympics-are-starting-to-pick-up/

    TSN will help out on those Saturdays when there is no NHL regional action(Rogers SportsNet has exclusivity to all NHL games on Saturdays). But the bigger NHL games almost will have to go to City TV with CBC/Radio-Canada and Rogers SportsNet too focused on live Pyeongchang 2018 coverage(although in cases like Saturday, Feb. 17, one of the SportsNet channels might be needed to carry the Montreal @ Las Vegas game, and the Boston @ Vancouver  game that night.) That's where TSN/2/3 might come in for Olympic action like skiing or figure skating.

  8. 5 hours ago, Durban Sandshark said:

    SportsNet also has the Toronto Maple Leafs regional rights too including on SportsNet Fan 590 radio that it also shares with TSN 1050 Toronto. TSN/RDS holds the regional rights towards the Maple Leafs, Senators, Jets, and the Canadiens with RDS holding the exclusive French rights towards the Habs (Canadiens for the unitiated) and Sens. But their resources won't be stretched thin like Rogers will be because of the latter's very massive national Canadian NHL TV contract with TVA Sports on the French side that Bell Media isn't involved. Contract lasts until 2026. Furthermore there's the TSN multichannel advantage, which it can use to show Winter Olympic events like it did acting as the bulk than SportsNet with Rio 2016 but not as much sports. Maple Leaf games will be TSN4, Sens are on TSN5, the Jets will be at TSN3, and the Canadiens will appear on TSN2. Issue is, where exactly the TSN channels will the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics from the TSN front will be shown? Surely TSN proper will but maybe with TSN2/3 for supplemental events with likely some simulcasting from the others until Sportscentre and NHL regional action. Or the sports. With Rogers SportsNet, I seriously think there will be a fusion with the CBC hockey personnel with the CBC acting as the bulk. Doubt highly we'll see some TSN hockey sportscasters involved. One can only imagine if the Vancouver Grizzlies were still existing and also showed all their games on Rogers SportsNet Pacific and West how that would affect things. As for as that Hockey Day in Canada coming on Saturday February 18, that early game Winnipeg at Montreal in the afternoon has to go to City TV with CBC/Radio-Canada and Rogers SportsNet too focused on live Pyeongchang 2018 coverage segments up to the early afternoon. In many cases. that hockey will be immediately afterwards Hockey Night in Canada and the regional/nationally televised games.

    Plus, there's also the additional fact that Rogers SportsNet also has half of the Toronto Raptors 82-game TV schedule it's committed to as well with four games during the Pyeongchang span, all on SportsNet One. TSN in comparison will only have two Raptors games at that month because their greater broadcasting priority of course will be with Pyeongchang 2018 and of the regional NHL team rights (ditto on the radio with TSN 1050 Toronto) with those multiple channels. Very safe to say that Rogers SportsNet will showcase men's and women's Olympic hockey as its anchor because of the NHL contract and of the hockey resources it currently hold with plenty of pre- and post-game analysis with the CBC having all the games, not just the Team Canada and the medal round ones of course. I am sure there will be ceremony simulcasting from Rogers SportsNet and TSN/RDS and possible replays. We'll touch upon the RDS French side, where things aren't as vast even with three channels--and its hockey personnel could get stretched out even more so. The TVA Sports hockey sportscasting guys MIGHT (emphasis on that word) get involved in South Korea because of the NHL rights, but I don't think so because there's no Olympics broadcasting involved with them.

    With the Olympics, be it Summer or Winter, it unquestionably will reach Millenials to bring forth more ad revenue for 17 days than MTV reaps in a year. Millenials are where it's at to get them into Olympic fever, and they've succeeded during Rio 2016. Snapchat and Buzzfeed will help them even further to reach the $10 billion ad revenue goal for NBCU as it highly picks up steam when we get closer for February:

    http://www.adweek.com/tv-video/ad-sales-for-nbcs-coverage-of-the-winter-olympics-are-starting-to-pick-up/

     

    I don't see any conflict for Hockey Day In Canada, since the Olympics aren't going on yet.

  9. On 9/26/2017 at 8:10 PM, Durban Sandshark said:

    Not shocked at all with this development from NBC with zero NHL games televised during the Winter Olympics on all platforms. Does certainly seem, at least on the surface, that NBC is giving "the not-so-subtle symbolic middle finger" towards NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman and the NHL for not allowing NBC and NBCSN to promote the NHL's star players repping for their countries at Pyeongchang 2018 for its early morning coverage in the latter, despite having a largely prosperous decade-long television partnership since the lockout as NBCSN's major tentpole sports product. Could the strains start showing? Based on the 13-hour time difference from Pyeongchang and the US east coast cities, the NBC Olympic TV network family can still show a handful of NHL games from February 9-26 for primetime. But NBC doesn't want to stretch its resources too thin (like its regular broadcasting talent and overloading with its Olympic feeds) or divide its between Pyeongchang and wherever it could go stateside and won't touch its regional sports cable channels to replace them. Strictly business on NBC's part as it makes better sense to give greater priority on the Winter Olympics that month. Curling seems to be just as popular with TV viewers during the Winter Olympics, so it could promote that well too:

    http://awfulannouncing.com/nhl/nbc-will-air-zero-nhl-games-olympics-coincidence.html

    https://www.sbnation.com/nhl/2017/9/26/16368584/nbc-nhl-olympics-broadcast-nbcsn-gary-bettman

    http://nypost.com/2017/09/23/nhls-decision-to-skip-olympics-leads-to-tv-embarrassment/

    https://www.cbssports.com/nhl/news/report-nhl-will-go-dark-across-all-nbc-platforms-during-the-2018-olympics/

    But the IOC says the NBC is more than free to show NHL games during Pyeongchang 2018 with the time zone difference. Theoretically it can with no conflicts; it can't entirely avoid the NHL. NBCSN may instead show Olympic highlights or Big East college basketball during that primetime segment:   

    http://aroundtherings.com/site/A__61634/Title__IOC-Says-NBC-Free-to-Air-NHL-Games-During-PyeongChang-2018/292/Articles

    CBC will have the same issue with stretching its resources too thin(they do have the regional SportsNet announcers though to help out.) Like for example, Rogers owns the rights to the Flames, Oilers and Canucks, so those regional crews could help out. Plus i don't think all of their regular NHL guys will go to Korea, maybe Hughson and maybe Randorf would go, and they still have Bob Cole to help out on NHL games, plus the regional guys.

  10. 1 hour ago, Quaker2001 said:

    Do you have any original thoughts on all this?  Because it seems like you're just repeating most of the points brought up in these stories and using phrases and talking points that clearly don't come from your own opinions.  

    To the last one.. the IOC doesn't have to say that.  They have no say in what NBC shows in and around Olympic coverage and it's noted in the story they don't impose restrictions, let alone that this is an Olympic sport.  This was entirely NBC's decision, and I agree with the sentiment that this is a middle finger to the NHL, because they could have showed at least some hockey (could have used the resources of Comcast RSNs) but they decided not to.  Perhaps we all should have figured this was coming weeks ago when the NHL schedules were first released, but clearly NBC decided not to change course.

    Also, to note.. it's a 14 hour difference between the US East coast and Korea during the Olympics (it's 13 hours now, but Korea doesn't observe Daylight Savings Time, so it will be 14 hours in February)

    I wonder if CBC will cover NHL during the Olympics? maybe with their regional SportsNet guys filling in.

  11. On 10/24/2014 at 5:03 PM, Durban Sandshark said:

    What NBC was planning to cover in abundance in Moscow? Doing educated guesses based on what we know was planned and what came after for NBC and even ABC. Of course, the usual anchor Summer Olympic sports like swimming, track and field, and gymnastics. Basketball would no doubt get plenty of love, as the Americans were the dominant force come Olympic time. Boxing, diving, rowing, volleyball (NBC undoubtably would promote the debut of the US women's team), water polo, cycling, wrestling, canoeing/kayaking, weightlifting, and equestrian all would've earned ample TV time. Soccer would have received a serious boost in US TV with the qualified US (men's) team that was replaced by Cuba showing some of their games along with the final, something that would help soccer's profile and its consistent media exposure in the USA as the NASL was slowly dying thanks to overexpansion and financial incompetence and with the USA not being in the World Cup qualification wilderness for 30 years at that point. With the boycott had NBC stayed committed to air them, all US residents may have gotten was perhaps the semis and definitely the gold medal final. Based on what ABC did in Los Angeles, I'm guessing even modern pentathlon, with the structure that it had back then, would get some decent coverage.

    Structural breakdown of daily broadcasting would likely been similar what we have today, albeit much smaller: NBC Today would kickstart things in the mornings as a lead-in with somebody in Moscow. During the daytime/afternoon hours it could have been a couple of hours on weekdays. Primetime undoubtably would be where it's at from 7-11pm US CST with various sports going on to show led by the anchor ones and likely some basketball included and boxing, for example--I'll assume Bryant Gumbel would anchor that. On weekends of course, we'd get them at 6pm. Saturdays and Sundays daytime coverage would go more all out with 5-7 hours each. Late nights woul be what I just mentioned in the last post hosted by David Letterman and Joe Garagiola that would be more lighthearted. Yes, you have to expect some Soviet Union featurettes and news during the ill-fated coverage, likely with John Chancellor guiding us. And, yes, those now-infamous Up Close & Personal puff pieces would dominate. Maybe like with Bob Costas/Meredith Viera/Matt Laurer years in Sochi, Vladimir Poszner would possibly stop by to help educate about the enigmatic Soviet Union to Americans like he did on Meet The Press back in those days. Like with Seoul 8 years later, NBC would've hopscotch along various sports going on giving it several minutes at a time with strong emphasis on the US Olympians and foreigners with strong medal contention. A crown jewel event like the men's and women's 100m may get live coverage with a reairing because it's very quick. Because of the time zone differential and the American TV business structural needs, NBC indeed would go tape-delayed in almost everything with Americans featured largely designated in primetime. Not sure where a sport like field hockey would fit into the mix had the USA qualified in either if not both. If that were the case, a timeslot surely would've been set aside for it, mostly in progress or tape-delayed unless they made it to the medal round. Team handball, archery, fencing, sailing, and shooting, sports with little to no serious US contention/interest, would find itself relegated towards brief highlights/narrative-weaving storylines. Maybe in the late night segments with seeing some action mixed from other sports like with maybe volleyball, weightlifting, and water polo.

    NBC cancelled its coverage but sent some people to Moscow, albeit in a reduced and minor capacity to 56 cards at the IBC, videotaping coverage with its own camera for posterity and was restricted to highlights on Today, primetime, and on a concluding highlights show presented by Gumbel (who Baron despises :P ).

    Here's a couple of "did you knows?" ABC Nightline, at the time of the Iran US Embassy hostage crisis, aired highlights of the Opening Ceremony and pledged to show daily highlights from the Moscow Olympics to start with, only to later announce that ABC, then THE Olympic network in the USA, can't show any further video footage from those Olympics because NBC still held exclusive US TV rights to showing Moscow 1980 footage. Bummer...

    A couple of music ones connected to NBC's Moscow 1980 footage are that Herb Alpert's instrumental "1980" from his 1979 Rise album was slated to be used by NBC as the official score for its Moscow coverage. It is a majestic track and certainly serve NBC really well at the time, though a bit dated now, in an apt way to usher in the 1980s since ABC still held the exclusive rights to Bugler's Dream and John Williams hadn't yet composed the Olympic Fanfare and Theme, Olympic Spirit, Summon The Heroes. "1980" does indeed capture IMO the Olympic majesty, competition, spirit, and pagentry without initionally being it. "1980" did eventually get some broadcast use by NBC Sports when it became the theme music for its 1986 World Cup soccer coverage in Mexico, which aptly had a Mexican touch when the Unites States was still struglling to break through in qualifying...and Canada did for its first and so far only time. But I digress about that.

     

     

    Also, there was the "We Are One" official NBC Olympic song that was to be used and already recorded for the Moscow Olympics, calling that the USA is one with the team and that all the athletes around the world are unified in the spirit of competition. NBC did eventually use it upon its Seoul 1988 Olympic preview, like on its first commercial break when the athletes arrive at the Seoul International Airport. And later for its Barcelona 1992 promos like this one for world lump jump record holder Mike Powell

     

     

    But NBC's 150.5 wasn't the largest amount of planned hours covered for Moscow in a boycotting nation. Japan's TV Asahi, not NHK as many would be stunned to know, paid for the exclusive Japanese TV rights to the Moscow 1980 back when it was known as NET (Nippon Educational Television) with plans to broadcast 206 hours with approximately 12 hours daily. Just weeks after it changed its name to TV Asahi in 1980 to reflect its new direction to be a commercial TV network, it drastically reduced its coverage plans from 206 all the way to just 40 hours with 68 cards reserved for their staff in Moscow following the Japanese government's decision to boycott them and deny their athletes a chance. You'll see some Moscow 1980 gymnastics clips on YouTube with some Japanese commentary. That's all from TV Asahi. Gymnastics, swimming, wrestling, track and field, and I think, volleyball were all covered because those are all popular sports to them.

    Even West Germany planned to broadcast more TV hours than NBC before it too joined the boycott. Not sure it was going to be co-aired like it is nowdays with ZDF and ARD. That nation, this version of the Federal Republic of Germany, was to have 180 hours in total from Moscow. I'll say solely ARD. After the boycott, coverage was reduced to a paltry 20 hours.

    The CBC also abandoned plans to cover the 1980 Moscow Olympics to the cost of $5 million+. CBC President Al Johnson decided to follow suit from the Canadian government in Ottawa after strong public pressure despite no communication between it and the crown corporation with its own boycott, thinking it would be "paradoxical" for the CBC to air a sporting event with very few, if any, Canadian participation and that few at home there would watch. It planned to send a 142-person crew to Moscow and stood to lose a combined $2.4 million in rights fees and facility rentals (C$1.2 million each) to pay back to the Soviets with an additional C$3.8 million advertising revenue loss. CTV planned to show primetime highlights package from Moscow in an arrangment with the CBC that got scuttled and dropped its Olympic coverage plans altogether on the same day the CBC announced it was dropping theirs. Went there anyway with 9 cards representation. CBC's plans for TV coverage in terms of hours was very similiar to NBC's but very likely was to be wall-to-wall live and nonstop me from early morning to the afternoon with maybe its own primetime highlights show, since it was not subject to strong business obligations like south of the border. I'd say no more than around 160 hours originally planned from the CBC.

    A few things about Moscow... Who would have done MLB for NBC if Joe Garagiola couldn't? Would that be where Costas or Merle Harmon would come in? I could see Harmon and Costas handling the MLB games for NBC during that period.

  12. On 11/5/2014 at 4:01 PM, Durban Sandshark said:

    Thanks for filling out some of the missing pieces for NBC with the info, Barcelona. All I knew was that the late Charlie Jones was going to call track and field at Lenin Stadium, partly because he said so in that Los Angeles Times article and the fact he was doing those sports at Seoul 8 years later. However, after looking at the Moscow schedule of events, Jones would have to hurry back to the Central Sports Palace that was nearby from Lenin Stadium in the last couple of days of gymnastics with track and field just starting. Don't know exactly what times the track and field events would start on those days. But I would presume gymnastics took place in the evening with say within 45 minutes to 2 hours to get there and have everything organized. Also, Diana Nyad was also going to be with NBC in Moscow as a reporter, very likely swimming, with her proficiency in Russian to help her. Then again, as she later did in Los Angeles for ABC, canoeing and kayaking wouldn't be that far away. Also, what was to be done with young Bobby Costas? What role and sports would he have announced? Anybody else do you know that could've worked at NBC back then with the sports? Being the biggest buyer of the Moscow Olympics back then, it would use its own video cameras and equipment more so than many other broadcasters worldwide and use it in conjunction with the host feed.

    Surely NBC could've done an Olympic preview in those days. Based on that schedule, I think it may have been on that opening Saturday at the 11am-noon slot if not the previous Friday night. That Saturday night's primetime surely would be the taped delayed Opening Ceremony. Had it been a full-fledged Olympics, some "seemingly insignificant" nations to Americans anyway would no doubt get the short shrift in the Parade of Nations thanks to commercial breaks, especially in a offshore one like in the former Soviet Union. The outcry would not be as bad as it would get later that NBC would make amends later even in glimpses right after commercial breaks ("Why in the hell NBC didn't show Mali in the Parade of Nations?! I wanna see the Malians!"). Also makes you wonder if NBC employed a few of those tactics later used like in Sochi, what parts do you think NBC would omit now that we've seen a fuller Moscow OC and OC?

    In any case, it may be rather difficult to figure out what would exactly telecast on those time slots after the swimming, gymnastics, diving, track and field, cycling, boxing, and rowing. In other words, what times exactly would the games involving USA basketball, volleyball, soccer, water polo, and maybe field hockey (if US qualified) based on NBC's programming structure? I do believe basketball would get primetime love with the men and women. Not sure if the gold medal games would be live though. Some things would designated for primetime like perhaps water polo and some volleyball if the USA is involved. Surely there will be some foreign coverage and victories to show, particularly whenever what the Communist bloc would up to in sports to better weave that Cold War Olympic TV narrative. No doubt it would've been very jingoistic with US Olympic TV space at a premium even at a then-record of 150 hours. If some people thought ABC's Los Angeles coverage was bad with it, they probrably would've been aghast with what NBC could've done if it went ahead in Moscow. Don't think we'd have the copyright that we see nowdays during the segments.

    As far as I understand it, Australia's Seven Network ultimately decided to go ahead and head out to Moscow around two weeks before the start of the Games with its staff. It paid a then-record A$1.4 million for the exclusive Australian TV rights to cover it live through 100 hours, much of it primetime-late night Australia time before signing off but will have highlights shows during the day. Previously Summer Olympics was shared between ABC, Seven, and Nine where even the Opening Ceremony was shared and, I think, simulcasted, from 5am AEST. Part of the team, if I recall reading correctly, stayed in the Adelaide studios. In Montreal's case, ABC and Seven limited the daily coverage and did the highlights packages several times a day with Nine branched out to handles more of the sports and news coverage with the available video. In a lot of ways, Seven's exclusive coverage of Moscow 1980 marked a new era. For one thing, no more cooperative Australian Olympic TV broadcasting; Aussie TV was fast maturing with color and better programming and presentation qualities and more sophisticated satelittes beaming things quicker and easier to Earth. Plus the Olympics, as we went along during the 1980s, was becoming more lucrative for advertisers and more commercial. It began this bouncing off of Australian Olympic TV rights (both Summer and Winter) that continues to this day, despite during the 1980s of Network Ten becoming "Australia's Olympic Network", a mantle 7 would later carry with great distinction during the next decade and beyond and just since reclaimed. Australia was still reeling from the effects of the fast-rising professionalism and the need for a rethink about its athletes and amateurism as seen with the disappointing Montreal medal display with no golds to show for it. It also brought live continuous Olympics coverage more consistently instead of designated it to primetime or highlights several times a day. Did something that not even the BBC could manage: show both ceremonies in their entirties.

    I'm sure with those 100 hours the Seven Network granted priority to the Australian athletes that decided to compete in Moscow. But it was a decimated team that had no field hockey and yachting without a doubt. Even some sponsors for Seven's coverage pulled out because of the fallout of then-PM Malcolm Fraser's boycott threat that the Australian Olympic Federation voted against. Consequently, it may explain why it was set at 100 hours and not more as hoped. But there was surely a lot of jumping around to various sports instead of sticking to just on event if it goes long--and chopping of blocks during the day with daily slots towards daily highlights. I'm sure for example, the Australian basketball and water polo teams didn't enjoy having their full games shown back in Moscow. Sure there was plenty of swimming and track for the Aussies to enjoy. Some events got completely overlooked by Seven because of no Australians or the sports had no to little appeal to them. With a few of its own cameras, it utilized its reliance towards the Soviet/global TV feed, as you surely noticed on the Moscow ceremonies by Balanced Australia.

    Seven's Moscow 1980 Olympic coverage was coming to a close with the CC and Seven showed the end of those who took part in Moscow during this coverage and brought them to down under. Also notice that Adidas is their official outfitter for the Seven team in Moscow, just like it was for the Australian Olympic Team then. Gary Wilkinson, Peter Waltham, Sandy Roberts, Peter Landy, and Graham McNaney apparently were commentators without specific portfolios, meaning they covered various Olympics sports that weren't already designated. I am also curious that John Devitt did all the aquatics including diving and water polo. Been mentioned elsewhere online that Bruce McAvaney was involved as a sportscaster for its Moscow coverage. He's not mentioned here. But he was host of the Adelaide end of the telecast, making his Australian Olympic TV debut before heading off to Network Ten Australia and cover its track and field Olympic coverage for much of the 1980s and eventually co-host Ten's Seoul 1988 coverage. If any of you Aussies here in these boards who have more intimate knowledge about of a programming guide of what was shown and at what times daily regarding 7's Moscow 1980 broadcast coverage, please help and your info would be greatly appreciated! :) Hope we get something

     

     

    New Zealand's Olympic TV coverage was restricted to just two minutes a day during TVNZ's evening news reports, which in NZ's case was just as well since only 3 canoeists (Ian Ferguson, Alan Thompson, and Geoff Walker) and one modern pentathlete (Brian Newth) competed under the black NZOCGA flag as independents dwindled out of a NZ team originally slated for to have 98 athletes. Whatever comprehensive Moscow coverage subsequently came was likely imported from Australia's Seven across the Tasman Sea.

    My guess is that Don Criqui would have had a role in Moscow for sure. He'd likely would have done basketball with McGuire likely, but if Charlie Jones didn't want to do two events on the same day, then gymnastics likely? Maybe Criqui would be at Central Sports Palace while Jones would be at Lenin Stadium.

  13. On 2/27/2017 at 3:32 PM, Quaker2001 said:

    You say that as if you think NBC is still using the same approach to their Olympic coverage as they have for 30 years now.  That's simply not true and it's a misconception that NBC doesn't deserve to deal with.

    Look at Atlanta 20 years ago.  No cable coverage (thank you Triplecast.. an idea ahead of its time, both 1 of the best and 1 of worst things ever to happen to Olympic television coverage), a 3 hour morning/afternoon show, no Internet presence, no streaming.  Think about how all that has changed since then and then tell me about the NBC structure.  If you want to argue that primetime is largely treated the same, that's harder to argue with.  But that's only a small portion of the overall package they're offering.  Don't be 1 of those people who thinks NBC's coverage starts and ends with primetime and that those other offerings are incidental.  That those are there in the first place is what allows NBC change how they measure viewership and, like you said, take a little emphasis off of primetime.

    That said, don't forget that the distant time zone works in their favor somewhat here.  There will be live events available in US primetime where there weren't in Sochi.  So hopefully that helps their cause.

    Same thing with the NCAA Tournament. CBS had the games to themselves, you got the afternoon games then the news/syndicated fare, then the evening games at 7:30. Now if you were in the area that got the 5:00 west coast game, then you got a fifth game, since that game preempted the news/syndicated stuff. This was also where CBS put The Price Is Right back then. I think if NBC did the Olympics the way that CBS/Turner do the NCAA playoffs, you might get more viewers that way. I don't think need to make priemtime a big deal, if you did cable coverage of the bigger events live, then a primetime replay. Tokyo would be a good Olympics to do that, since the markets don't open till 9:30 our time, and there isn't much news going on overnight here in the states.

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