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tractarian

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tractarian last won the day on October 31 2016

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About tractarian

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  1. Here's a look at how the in-house graphics for the various host broadcasters have changed throughout the years. Munich 1972. At the dawn of the computer age. No frills. Montréal 1976. Not much to see here. Circular vignette-type effect used to superimpose an image over background. Los Angeles 1984. Multiple colors used for the first time - and a deep drop shadow on everything. Wavy flag graphics also make their first appearance. Seoul 1988. The deep drop shadow remains. Individual competitors' names appeared on a gray slab with a wavy flag.
  2. Story checks out - in Brasilia it looks like there is still 2014 World Cup signage on the upper deck!!!
  3. Either that or a Comcast shareholder! Really though, I've said nice things about NBC. I loved the online coverage this year - the first time in a couple of decades that I could say I loved something that NBC has done vis-a-vis the Olympics. And I'll concede I forgot that they did show a couple of the long-distance finals - and I give them credit for those things. It's certainly better that it used to be; don't get me wrong. I just find it baffling how someone (on an Olympics forum, no less) could righteously defend NBC's inalienable right to wring every last dollar out of the Olympics
  4. You won't acknowledge that "much" of NBC's TV coverage was tape-delayed? (You must be an NBC employee or close relative thereof!) The fact is, all of the finals in those latter three sports were tape-delayed. And those are the favorite sports of the casual Olympics fan (read: women) that drive the ratings. Well... they tried it on an obscure cable platform and at a premium price. I wouldn't say that the failure of the Triplecast says anything about the public's taste for pure Olympics sports coverage, in general.
  5. You got me - I was exaggerating. I acknowledge that a lot of the NBC TV coverage was live. You should acknowledge, however, that much of it was not. In particular, none of the big events - think finals in swimming, gymnastics, and athletics - were live on TV. As I said, we'll just have to agree to disagree on whether people need "convincing" to watch the Olympics in primetime in this day and age. I suppose we'll also have to agree to disagree on whether the best way to "convince" people to watch the Olympics is to spoon-feed them schmaltzy up-close-and-personal features, splice and dice th
  6. We'll just have to agree to disagree on that! The way I see it, this is the Olympics we're talking about. People don't need convincing. This has always been true, but is especially so today when most TV viewers live in an immersive media environment and have plenty of options if they want to get to get "up close and personal" with athletes other than getting spoon-fed by NBC. Of course, NBC wants to be the sole source - but that's the point, why should I give them credit for something that benefit their bottom line but irritates me as an Olympics fan? It's not because otherwise they won't
  7. This attitude, I think, is probably shared by a vast majority of NBC primetime Olympic viewers. And it helps explain why NBC is willing to put everything online for free (for cable subscribers), and yet refuses to air major "primetime" events live on TV. Most viewers just aren't interested in watching every competition, from beginning to end, including all the non-contenders and non-Americans. And so making that available online earlier in the day won't change the fact that these viewers will still watch in primetime, where they can get their slick little pre-packaged mix of of highlights,
  8. Why stop there? Imagine if NBC charged $200 a pop for live online feeds. Imagine if they just increased the amount of TV ads they show: they could make it 25 minutes out of each hour instead of 20. And there's lots of untapped potential for product placement: imagine Bob Costas chugging a can of Coke before every commercial break. So much untapped potential! The profits could be in the billions! The reason NBC doesn't do all this stuff isn't because it wouldn't make them money. It's because it would make them a national disgrace. Of course, many already think they are a national di
  9. Yup. In other words, showing events live online does not erode the primetime audience; it boosts it. I guess the question, now, is that: does that also hold true for showing events live on TV before primetime? It's hard to say. Time-shifting by viewers might be a key issue. You can DVR a live TV broadcast, but you can't with an internet feed (not easily, at least).
  10. Last year I attempted to purchase about $100 worth of merchandise from the official online London 2012 store. The website informed me I couldn't order because I was located in the US, and it directed me to the USOC's website. The USOC website had no officially-branded London 2012 gear. So I'm $100 richer, but I don't have any London 2012 merchandise. Such a shame that London 2012 wouldn't take my money!
  11. Ha! It's only nine hours ahead of my time zone (central). That means I'll still be awake for the early-morning events like alpine skiing. And I'll definitely be up at 10 or 11 a.m. to watch the evening events. So bring on the Winter Games live streaming, NBC! How can you watch the BBC or EBU stream but not the NBC stream? You're right though; live online streaming (even on a fast laptop) is nice but is nothing compared to HDTV....
  12. Well, I for one am glad to say that I didn't catch one minute of NBC's broadcast of the closing ceremony - instead I watched their live streaming coverage online. And - despite the all-too-frequent 15-second commercial breaks - the coverage was excellent. Other than the audio, that is, but that's OBS's problem, not NBC's. In fact, I switched to the "Natural Audio" audio feed, instead of the inane English language commentary, and that seemed to fix the audio problems. (Unlike the OC, the CC didn't require much explanation - especially to someone familiar with British pop music - so the comm
  13. Overall (after two weeks of watching on TV from six time zones away), I'd say the look has grown on me. The detail, hard to observe at first, makes it very distinct. And it has real versatility in terms of color - which allowed it to be colorful (like Athens/Beijing/LA/Barcelona, unlike Atlanta/Sydney) without being too loud (like Beijing). It does have some inconsistencies and mistakes in some venues, but overall I'd say it ranks with Athens at the top of the list.
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